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Full text of "Biographical review ... Containing life sketches of leading citizens of Middlesex County, Massachusetts .."

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BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



VOLUME XXVII 



CONTAINING LIFE SKETCHES OF LEADING CITIZENS OF 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



MASSACHUSETTS 



) 



Who among men art thou, and thy years how many, good friend ? — Xenophanes. 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1898 



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ATLANTIC STATES SERIES OF BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEWS. 



The volumes issued in this series up to date are the following : — 



I. Otsego County, New York. 

II. Madison County, -New York. 

IIL Broome County, New York. 

IV. Columbia County, New York. 

V. Cayuga County, New York. 

VI. Delaware County, New York. 

VII. Livingston and Wyoming Counties, 
New York. 

VIII. Clinton and Essex Counties, New York. 

IX. Hampden County, Massachusetts. 

X. Franklin County, Massachusetts. 

XI. Hampshire County, Massachusetts. 

XII. Litchfield County, Connecticut. 

XIII. York County, Maine. 

XIV. Cumberland County, Maine. 

XV. Oxford and Franklin Counties, 
Maine. 



XVI. Cumberland County, New Jersey. 
XVII. Rockingham County, New Hampshire. 
XVIII. Plymouth County, Massachusetts. 
XIX. Camden and Burlington Counties, 
New Jersey. 
XX. Sagadahoc, Lincoln, Knox, and 
Waldo Counties, Maine. 
XXI. Strafford and Belknap Counties, 

New Hampshire. 
XXII. Sullivan and Merrimack Counties, 
New Hampshire. 
xxiii. hillsboro and cheshire counties, 
New Hampshire. 

XXIV. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

XXV. Norfolk County, Massachusetts. 

XXVI. New London County, Connecticut. 

XXVII. Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 



Note. — All the biographical sketches published in this volume were submitted to their respective subjects or to the sub- 
scribers, from whom the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or correction before going to press, and a reasonable 
time was allowed in each case for the return of the typewritten copies. Most of them were returned to us within the time allotted, 
or before the work was printed, after being corrected or revised ; and these may therefore be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to u: , apd, as we have no, means o;i: ■krjG-\*';ing whether they contain errors or not, we 
cannot vouch for their accuracy. In justice to; out readers, ind t& renaei ihis w'ork'mofe valuable for reference purposes, we have 
indicated all uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*), placed immeoiaicly after the name of the subject. They will be found 
printed on the last pages of the book. 

B. R. PUB. CO. 



PREFACE. 



THE present issue of our publication, devoted, as its title-page shows, to worthies 
of Middlesex County, is our twenty-seventh volume of recoi'ds of contemporary 
life in the Atlantic States, our sixth treating of sons and daughters of Massa- 
chusetts, the scope of the Review, as heretofore, being such as to include — besides 
outline sketches of individuals — names, dates, traditionary allusions, and authenticated 
facts connecting the forces now in the field of industrial activity, men and women of 
progress, users of talent, masters of circumstance and opportunity, with their pred- 
ecessors, the pioneers into whose labors they have entered, the stock whose char- 
acteristics they inherit and transmit. 

Our work is in keeping with two marked features of the time — the growing- 
interest in minute historical research, shown in earnest, protracted endeavor to restore 
every long-lost sheep and lamb to its place in the genealogical fold, and the increase 
of societies having for their object the collection and preservation of memorials of 
former generations. Much has hitherto been left undone in this direction, and in 
consequence a double task falls to us of to-day. It is encouraging to be reminded 
that " whoever investigates and records his family's history performs a duty and favor, 
not only to himself and the present generation, but also to all future generations," 
contributing, it may be added, a paragraph to the history of civilization, and bearing 
witness to the undying potency of personality. 

BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW PUBLISHIiN-G CO. 
July, 1898. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/biographicalrevi1898biog2 



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PUBLIC 



WILLIAM A. BANCROFT. 

3rigndie]-general of Volunteers by President McKinley i 



BIOSRAPHIGAL. 




ON. WILLIAM AMOS 
BANCROFT, who in the 
present decade has served four 
terms as Mayor of Cambridge, 
and who in July, 1897, was 
unanimously elected Brigadier- 
general of the Second Brigade, 
M. V. M., was born on a farm 
in Groton, Mass., April 26, 
1S55. He is a son of Charles 
and Lydia Emeline (Spauld- 
ing) Bancroft, and is of old New England 
stock, his immigrant ancestors on both sides 
having come to this country about 1640. 
Among his remote ancestors he numbers the 
famous Mrs. Anne Hutchinson and Henry 
Bass, of the Boston Tea Party. 

Reared on a farm and naturally possessed 
of a vigorous constitution, William A. Ban- 
croft early became noted for athletic prowess. 
He was educated in the public schools, at 
the Lawrence Academy in his native town, at 
Phillips Exeter Academy, from which he was 
graduated in 1874, at Harvard College, where 
he received his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1878, and at the Harvard Law School. While 
in college he was captain and stroke oar of the 
Harvard University crew that defeated the 
Yale crews in 1877, 1878, and 1879. Ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk bar in 1881, he left the 
practice of law in 1885 to become superin- 
tendent of the Cambridge Street Railway 
Company ; and he was afterward general road- 
master of the West End Street Railway Com- 
pany. He was superintendent of the Cam- 
bridge road at the time of the strike in 1887, 
when all but about thirty of the six hundred 
and fifty employees were out; and such were 
his firmness, energy, and organizing ability, 
that in a short time all of the company's 



twenty-two lines were in operation, and the 
strikers admitted his fairness, and accorded 
him their respect. In i8go he left the street 
railway business, and returned to the practice 
of law. 

He joined the militia as a private in 1875 
while a college Freshman ; and he rose through 
the various grades, being made Captain of 
Company B, Fifth Regiment, in 1879 and 
Colonel of the regiment in 18S2. Under his 
command the regiment increased in efficiency; 
and in 1889, on account of its military ex- 
cellence, it was detailed as escort to the Mas- 
sachusetts delegation at the centennial celebra- 
tion of the inauguration of Washington in 
New York City. As senior Colonel of the 
Massachusetts militia, General Bancroft com- 
manded the Second Brigade at the mobiliza- 
tion of all the State troops in Boston. 

A prominent Republican, General Bancroft 
has the good will of both parties, and was first 
elected to public office at a time when the city 
was Democratic by a large majority. He was 
elected to the Common Council of Cambridge 
for the year 1882. In the fall of that year 
and of the two succeeding years he was 
chosen Representative to the State legislature, 
serving in 1883, 1884, and 1885. While in 
the House he served on several important 
committees, of some of which he was chair- 
man. At the first election after he left the 
street railway business, he was made a mem- 
ber of the Board of Aldermen; and he was 
chairman of the board that and the following 
year, being re-elected. In 1892 he was 
elected Mayor of the city, and he was three 
times re-elected. His administrations were 
marked by economy and progress. One fa- 
miliar with public affairs in Cambridge dur- 
ing the past quarter of a century, who has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



known all the city's mayors, said, "As an 
executive officer Mayor Bancroft stands pre- 
eminent among the mayors of Cambridge." 
On his retirement from office after four years 
of distinguished service he was tendered a 
public dinner by his townsmen. In 1893 
General Bancroft presided at the State Re- 
publican Convention, and made an eloquent 
address. 

He was married in 1S79 to Mary Shaw, of 
Peabody, and has three children — Hugh, Guy, 
and Catherine. In 1893 General Bancroft was 
chosen by the alumni of Harvard a member 
of the Board of Overseers; in 1S94 he was 
elected president of the New England Alumni 
of the Phillips Exeter Academy; and in 1897 
he was chosen president of the Cambridge 
Club, and also president of the Mayors' Club 
of Massachusetts. In 1896 General Bancroft 
became one of the counsel for the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway Company; and in January, 
1897, he was elected a director and vice-presi- 
dent of the company, which has leased the 
West End Street Railway, and will build an 
elevated railway in Boston and vicinity. He 
is also a director in the United States Trust 
Company. His business career and his ten 
years of public service have shown him to be 
possessed of many qualities of mind and heart 
that bring success, and he is one of the most 
attractive figures among the younger public 
men of Massachusetts. 



"ON. JOHN READ, a well-known 
resident of Cambridge, secured his 
elementary education in the public 
schools of the city, and was gradu- 
ated at Harvard in the class of 1862. When 
the nation needed men to defend its honor and 
life, it found him ready for its service. He 
entered the United States navy, and soon 
found what war meant. It was his fortune to 
be often where the fighting was fiercest, par- 
ticipating in ten different engagements; and 
in April, 1863, he had the experience of the 
vessel which bore him going down riddled 
with shot. It was the "Keokuk," a turreted 
iron-clad ram, which met its fate in making 
an attack on Charleston, S.C., being one of 
the fleet which w^s under the command of Ad- 



miral Dupont in that memorable contest. The 
engagement was a terrific one, the "Keokuk" 
receiving such a fire as up to that time had 
been almost unknown in naval warfare. She 
was at the head of the attacking fleet, and re- 
ceived the combined fire of all the forts in the 
harbor. In twenty minutes her armor was 
penetrated by nearly a hundred shots, and she 
sank. Mr. Read received honorable mention 
for his conduct in this action. 

His next service was in the West Gulf 
Squadron. Here one expedition and engage- 
ment followed another, and he had his place 
in them all, for many months during the last 
two years of the war his vessel taking part in 
many contests, and also doing blockade duty 
off the Louisiana and Texas coasts. He was 
in the battle of Sabine Pass, where the Union 
forces met with disaster and great slaughter. 
He also was in all the engagements of the oc- 
cupation of the Texas coast by General Wash- 
burn in the winter of 1863, and took part in 
the capture of Corpus Christi, Aransas Pass, 
and Matagorda. 

But an experience even more severe than 
that of battle awaited him, that of imprison- 
ment in rebel prisons. In May, 1864, during 
an engagement at Calcasien Pass, La., he was 
captured by the rebels. For eight months he 
was confined in the prison camps in Texas, 
suffering hardships and exposures so terrible 
that only thirty-two of the one hundred and 
eleven men who were captured in May were 
living when release came in December, expos- 
ure without shelter and insufficient food hav- 
ing ended the lives of seventy-nine of his 
comrades. This rate of mortality put the 
Texas swamp prison camps among the worst 
in the entire South, equalling in their horror 
the terrible records of Andersonville and 
Libby. Only thirty-two sick and wasted men 
remained in the camp which had held seven 
hundred brave Union soldiers; and, as these 
were too sick to cook their own rations or 
care for themselves, the Confederates closed 
the camp, and sent them to the Union lines. 
But for this the entire company would soon 
have been obliterated. 

In the whole war there was no greater 
suffering or larger percentage of mortality 
than in the Texas swamp prison camps. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In spite of all that he had suffered, he 
essayed to do further duty, and was assigned 
to the United States sloop of war "Kear- 
sarge," but the privations and suffering of his 
previous service had broken his health, and 
near the close of the war he resigned. 

Mr. Read is a member of Post No. 56, 
G. A. R.; of the military order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States; of the Kear- 
sarge Naval Veterans; and of the Association 
of Survivors of Rebel Prisons. 

After his return from the war Mr. Read 
became a partner of William Read & Sons, 
but also found time for public service. He 
was a member of the Common Council in the 
years 1880-81; of the Board of Aldermen in 
1S82-83; of the Massachusetts House of Rep- 
resentatives in 1888; of the Massachusetts 
Senate in 1892 and 1893. 

He was on important committees in the 
legislature, being chairman of Committees of 
Military Affairs, Water Supply, and Federal 
Relations, and also member of Banks and 
Banking, Education, and Prisons. Tn the 
election of 1891 he was elected by a very 
handsome majority, wiping out the Demo- 
cratic lead of the previous year, and being 
elected by a majority of three hundred and 
thirty-four, thus turning to the Republican 
party a gain of eight hundred and fifty-four 
votes over the previous year. 

As a legislator he has always been found on 
the right side of the great questions. He has 
been much interested in the improvement of 
the public service, and gave his support to the 
Australian ballot law. No temperance meas- 
ure failed to receive his vote. 

He was recognized by his fellow-members 
as a clear-headed, practical business man, with 
an excellent capacity for stating his views 
clearly and forcibly in the debates, in many 
of which he took part. The modification of 
the bill in relation to truant schools for Mid- 
dlesex County, so that small institutions may 
be established instead of one large one, was 
due quite largely to Mr. Read's management. 

He introduced and carried through the Sen- 
ate the petition for authority to issue five 
hundred thousand dollars additional water 
bonds for Cambridge; also the petition for 
authority to make a loan for public parks, 



securing an amendment providing for the ap- 
pointment of park commissioners. He also 
secured passage of an act for taking land in 
Belmont for a high service reservoir for Cam- 
bridge, in spite of strong opposition from Bel- 
mont. He also had charge of and was instru- 
mental in passing the bill for the increase of 
the Massachusetts naval militia. This arm 
of the service was originally created by a bill 
presented by Mr. Read when he was in the 
legislature in 1888. 

But his most important work was upon the 
annexation question. There was in the Sen- 
ate a combination of circumstances which 
made it seem probable at one time that the 
decision might be adverse to Cambridge. 
The Committee on Cities recommended that 
the matter be "referred to the next General 
Court." Senator Read was not satisfied with 
this semi-approval, and was unwilling that the 
subject should lie open to the next legislature 
to be again taken up, and therefore determined 
to kill it. His principal opponent was confi- 
dent of success, having with him the Commit- 
tee on Cities, backed by the advocates of an- 
nexation. Against both these elements he 
alone made the fight, with the motion that the 
whole question be "indefinitely postponed." 
After a long and hot debate Mr. Read carried 
the Senate in favor of this motion. A recon- 
sideration was attempted at a later day by the 
advocates of annexation, but Senator Read 
again carried the day, and the proposition was 
thus killed and thrown out of the legislature 
for good. These facts are mentioned as show- 
ing Mr. Read's ability as a legislator and his 
influence in the Senate. 

Mr. Read has always been a Republican in 
State and national politics. In city politics 
he has been a hearty supporter of the Cam- 
bridge non-partisan methods of selecting 
officers. He is greatly interested in all pub- 
lic matters, and the spirit which prompted 
him to offer his life to the nation in the days 
of peril has never ceased to control him when 
there was opportunity to promote the public 
interest. 

In the fiftieth anniversary Cambridge cele- 
bration in 1896, Mr. Read was Chief Mar- 
shal, and was in a large measure responsible 
for its notable success. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



XTdEWITT LAPHAM, a well-known 
F| . insurance agent and real estate dealer 
■-'- at 86 Broadway, East Somerville, and 

president of the Common Council, was born 
in Littleton, Mass., July 6, 1845, son of 
Luther and Desire (Needham) Lapham. His 
first American ancestor came to this country 
in 1634. Sylvanus Lapham, grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch and a native of 
Marshfield, Mass., was for some time a mes- 
senger at the State House in Boston. He 
passed the latter part of his life in Fitchburg, 
Mass. He reared a family of thirteen chil- 
dren. 

Luther Lapham, F. Dewitt Lapham 's 
father, who was born in Fitchburg, when a 
young man learned the wheelwright's trade. 
He later settled in Littleton, where he was 
engaged in carriage-making for the rest of his 
life, and died at the age of sixty-eight years. 
His wife, Desire, was born in Peabody, 
Mass., daughter of John and Betsey Needham, 
her father being a farmer and stone-cutter. 
She became the mother of four children, two 
of whom are now living, namely: Calvin L., 
a resident of Lynn, Mass. ; and F. Dewitt. 
She died at the age of seventy-two years. 
Both she and her husband were members of 
the Congregational church. 

F. Dewitt Lapham received his elementary 
schooling in Littleton, and subsequently took 
a business course at a commercial college in 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He began active life as 
a book-keeper, working for one concern four 
years, and being later employed for seventeen 
years by Sussman Brothers, Boston. Since 
1886 he has been engaged in handling real 
estate in Somerville, speculating to some ex- 
tent, and acting as agent and collector for a 
number of property owners. He also repre- 
sents the German American, Continental, and 
Niagara Insurance Companies. A supporter 
of the Republican party, he takes an active 
part in public affairs, and was elected to the 
Common Council in 1894, and was chosen 
president of that body in January, 1897. He 
is a member of the School Board. In Ma- 
sonry he is a member of the Blue Lodge and 
Chapter in this city. He is Past Grand of 
Harvard Lodge, No. 32, I. O. O. F. ; Past 
Chief Patriarch of Somerville Encampment, 



No. 48 ; a member of the Stoneham Canton, 
Patriarchs Militant; has been secretary of 
Excelsior Council, Royal Arcanum, for eigh- 
teen years; has held the important chairs in 
Somerville Council, Order of the Home Cir- 
cle; and belongs to the United Order of the 
Eastern Star, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and the Webcoit Club. He is also 
Lieutenant Colonel of the Second Regiment. 

In 1869 Mr. Lapham was joined in mar- 
riage with Jennie H. Dickson, who was born 
in Salem, Mass., a daughter of Thomas Dick- 
son, an old resident of that city and a Califor- 
nia pioneer. He and his wife have had two 
children — Caroline F. and Jennie E. The 
last-named married Daniel Knowles, a sales- 
man of Boston, and died at the age of twenty- 
six years. Mr. and Mrs. Lapham attend the 
Universalist church. 



t^o 



EORGE A. HOBBS, editor and pub- 
\ 1^ I lisher of the Woburn Jo}irnal, and 
^— ^ for seventeen years past a resident of 
Woburn, Mass., was born in Canaan, Somer- 
set County, Me., May 25, 1824. His father. 
Dr. Hans P. Hobbs, was born in Wells, York 
County, Me., November 12, 1796; and his 
mother, whose maiden name was Phoebe Tut- 
tle, was born in Berwick, York County, Me., 
March 12, 1804. His paternal grandparents 
were Thomas and Abigail (Patten) Hobbs. 

Josiah Hobbs, the emigrant ancestor of this 
branch of the family, was born in England in 
1649, came to Boston on the ship "Arbella" 
in July, 1671, and about 1690 was a resident 
of Woburn. After nearly two hundred years, 
during which period no Hobbs inhabited the 
place, George A. Hobbs of this sketch, his 
lineal descendant, was the first to become a 
resident. Josiah Hobbs died in 1741 in Lex- 
ington, where he had made his home many 
years, and where he and his wife were ad- 
mitted to the church in 1699. (See History 
of Lexington, Mass.) Hans P. Hobbs and 
Phoebe Tuttle were married at Canaan, Me., 
in April, 1823. He died in July, 1830. She 
is now (1897) a resident of California. 

In March, 1834, after the death of his 
grandfather Hobbs, George A. Hobbs, then 
not quite ten years old, went to live with his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



grandmother and his uncle, James Hobbs, on 
the ancestral farm in Wells, Me. He ob- 
tained his education in the district schools 
of the town, at Kennebunk Academy, and at 
West Cambridge (now Arlington), Mass. In 
the winter of 1841-42 he taught his first 
school at Wells, and he subsequently taught 
in Somerset and Kennebec Counties, Maine. 
In December, 1844, he returned to Canaan, 
his native town, and in the spring of 1845 
began the study of law with his step-father, 
George M. Mason, Esq., who had married his 
mother some years before. In due time Mr. 
Hobbs was admitted to the bar in Somerset 
County. 

During his student days he dabbled weakly 
in literature, but with little pecuniary gain. 
Early in the summer of 1852 he was appointed 
associate editor of the The People s Press, a 
Whig paper, published by H. P. Pratt at 
Skowhegan, Me., for the Presidential cam- 
paign in which General Scott was the Whig 
candidate. That political party ceased to 
exist with the close of the campaign of 1852. 
In September, 1853, Mr. Hobbs was elected 
by the people Clerk of the Supreme Judicial 
Court for Somerset County, Maine, for a term 
of three years. He took possession of the 
office at Norridgewock on January i, 1854, 
and surrendered it to his successor on January 
I, 185.7. During the Presidential campaign 
of 1856 he was political editor of The Advo- 
cate, published at North Anson, Me., by Al- 
bert Moore. On March 29, 1857, he left 
Maine with his wife and son for Geneseo, 
Henry County, 111., where he arrived on 
April 3, 1857, and where he made his home 
continuously, e.Kcept from November, 1857, to 
July, 1859, for the next twenty years. In 
December, 1858, he bought T/ic Gcncsco Re- 
piiblie, and was its editor until July, 1877. 
In April, 1865, he was appointed by Abraham 
Lincoln Postmaster of Geneseo. He was com- 
missioned by Andrew Jackson, Lincoln hav- 
ing been assassinated between the appoint- 
ment and the commission; was removed by 
Johnson in 1866 for political reasons; ap- 
pointed by President Grant in 1869; reap- 
pointed by him in 1873; and appointed by 
President Hayes in 1877. A month later he 
resigned, and in July of that year he bought 



the Biddeford, Me., Union and Journal, and 
removed from Illinois to that city. He sold 
out the paper in July, 1880, and on August i 
following bought the Woburn (M?l?,s.) Jon?-nal, 
which he continues to edit and publish. 

On February 26, 1852, George A. Hobbs 
was united in marriage to Emeline West 
Lewis, daughter of Captain Jabez and Cynthia 
Hobby (Newhall) Lewis, the ceremony being 
performed at her home in Fairfield, Me. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hobbs have had one child, a son. 
He was born at Norridgewock, Somerset 
County, Me., May 16, 1855, and died at Wo- 
burn, Mass., December 24, 1895. 



W\ 



LLIAM JAMES ROLFE, Litt.D., 

was born in Newburyport, Mass., 
December 10, 1827. Son of John 
and Lydia (Moulton) Rolfe, he is of the 
eighth generation in lineal descent from 
Henry Rolfe, who came from Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, and was one of the original proprietors 
of Newbury, Mass., receiving a grant of land 
there in 1635. John Rolfe, brother of Henry, 
came over in 1638. Several of the family 
have graduated from Harvard. One of them, 
the Rev. Benjamin Rolfe, of Haverhill, was 
the victim of an Indian massacre in 170S. 
William Moulton, father of Mrs. Lydia M. 
Rolfe, went down in the sloop-of-war " Wasp " 
during the War of 181 2. 

Dr. Rolfe is the sole survivor of three chil- 
dren born to his parents, one of his brothers 
having died before he was twenty, and the 
other being one of the victims of the Pember- 
ton Mill disaster at Lawrence, Mass., in 
i860. His youth was passed in Lowell, 
Mass. In 1845 ^^ entered Amherst, and, 
though he left college in 184S, his name was 
subsequently enrolled among the regular grad- 
uates of 1849. The degree of Master of Arts 
was conferred upon him in 1859 by Harvard, 
and by Amherst in 1865; and he was honored 
with the degree of Doctor of Literature by 
Amherst in 1887. After leaving college he 
taught in Maryland and Massachusetts, and 
was master of the Cambridge High School 
from 1861 to 1868. From 1867 till 1890 he 
was an editor of the Popular Science Nezvs 
(formerly the Boston Journal of Chemistry), 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for several years he had charge of the Shak- 
sperian department of the Literary World, 
and more recently he has had charge of the 
same department in the New York Critic. In 
1880 he accepted the chair of English litera- 
ture in the Martha's Vineyard Summer Insti- 
tute; in 1 88 1 he was made vice-president of 
the institute; and on the resignation of Colo- 
nel Sprague, February 13, 1882, he was 
unanimously elected president. He served as 
president six years, resigning to make a trip 
to Europe. The Martha's Vineyard Summer 
Institute is the oldest of the summer schools 
that embrace science and art, languages and 
literature. When Dr. Rolfe was elected pres- 
ident of the institute, Colonel Sprague said to 
the directors, "You are fortunate, indeed, to 
secure the services of one who has achieved 
success in both science and literature, one 
whose fame, through his works, is not only 
national but international." Most of Dr. 
Rolfe's text-books on the English classics 
have been published by Harper & Brothers, 
and are models of scholarship and typography. 
Among the more recent ones may be men- 
tioned: "Shakespeare, the Boy" (1896); and 
"Elementary Study of English" (1896). 
With Joseph H. Hanson he published: "A 
Handbook of Latin Poetry" (Boston, 1865); 
"Selections from Ovid and Virgil" (1866; 
second edition, 1867) ; and with Joseph A. 
Gillett, "The Cambridge Course of Physics," 
including chemistry, natural philosophy, and 
astronomy (six volumes, 1867-68). In 1867 
he published an edition of George L. Craik's 
"English of Shakespeare," which was fol- 
lowed by his complete edition of Shakespeare 
(forty volumes. New York, 1870-83; also 
issued in twenty volumes as the "Friendly 
Edition"). He edited Select Poems of Gold- 
smith (187s); of Gray (1876); of Tennyson 
(1884); of Browning (1886); of Wordsworth 
(1888); "The Young People's Tennyson" 
(1886); Scott's "Lady of the Lake" (1882); 
"Marmion" (1884); "Lay of the Last Min- 
strel" (1886); and the "Complete Poems" 
(1887); "Enoch Arden and Other Poems" 
(1887); "A Blot in the 'Scutcheon, and 
Other Dramas of Browning" (1887); Byron's 
"Childe Harold" (1885); "Minor Poems 
of Milton" (1887); "Tales of Chivalry" 



(1888); "Tales from English History" 
(1888); Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient 
Rome" (1888); "Tales from Scottish His- 
tory" (1889); "Fairy Tales" (1891) ; and 
Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare" (two vol- 
umes, 1890). Of his edition of Shakespeare, 
more than half a million volumes have been 
sold in this country and in England. 

Dr. Rolfe has contributed various articles 
to the North American Review, the Arena, and 
various other journals. He is an honorary 
editor of Poet-Lore (Boston), and was asso- 
ciate editor of the Massachusetts Teacher for 
several years. He was elected president of 
the Browning Society after Colonel Higgin- 
son's retirement, and he filled that office for 
two years. For several years he has been presi- 
dent of the Old Cambridge Shakspere Asso- 
ciation, and also of a flourishing Shakspere 
Club in Boston. He is an attendant of the 
First Unitarian Church of Cambridge. He 
has been seventeen times to Europe. 

He was married in 1856 at Dorchester to 
Eliza J., daughter of Joseph Carew, the well- 
known sculptor of Boston, and has three sons 
— John Carew, George William, and Charles 
Joseph. John Carew Rolfe, Ph.D., who was 
graduated at Harvard in 1881, and has also 
studied at Athens and in Munich, is now pro- 
fessor of Latin in the State University of 
Michigan, George William was graduated at 
Harvard in 1885, and is instructor of chemis- 
try in the Boston Institute of Technology. 
Charles Joseph, Harvard graduate, class of 
1889, is a practising lawyer with office at 5 
Tremont Street, Boston. He married a 
grand-daughter of Joseph Jefferson, and his 
home is in Concord. 



HENRY PARKS SHERMAN, a real 
estate dealer of Waltham, Mass., was 
born in Wayland, Mass., December 
— ' Sj 1837, son of Samuel and Mary 
(Wheeler) Sherman. His grandfather, Reu- 
ben Sherman, was also a native of the same 
town. Samuel Sherman, father of Henry P., 
carried on general farming in Wayland. He 
had five children — Theodore S., Nancy W., 
Mary, Henry Parks, and Hiram G. Theodore 
S., the eldest, resides in his native town. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



where he has been a member of the Board of 
Selectmen for years, and at one time was 
chairman. Hiram G., the youngest, enlisted 
as a private in the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts 
Regiment, where he received a Lieutenant's 
commission, was brevetted Captain, and re- 
turned in charge of a company. He now has 
charge of the Monadnock Mills, a bleachery 
at Clareraont, N.H. One daughter, Mrs. 
Nancy W. Smith, lives in Natick, Mass. 
Mary died in infancy. Both parents have 
passed away. 

Henry Parks Sherman was educated in the 
common schools of his native town, and com- 
menced the active work of life as a shoe- 
maker. Later he came to Waltham, and was 
a private watchman here for six years. He 
subsequently became superintendent of the 
Waltham & Newton Street Railroad, which 
position he held for si.x years. He was also 
employed in the watch factory for ten years. 
For the past twenty years he has devoted his 
time to the real estate business. For several 
years he has been an honorary member of 
Monitor Lodge, F. & A. M., of Waltham. 
He is a member of the Congregational church 
at Wayland. Mr. Sherman is a Republican 
in politics. Though not an aspirant for pub- 
lic office, he has been favored in that respect 
by his fellow-townsmen to some extent. He 
was Constable for twenty consecutive years. 
When Waltham became a city, he was elected 
one of the Board of Commissioners of the 
Public Buildings and Grounds, and at the 
present he is one of the Board of Cemetery 
Commissioners. 

Mr. Sherman m.arried Laura A. Richard- 
son, daughter of Benjamin Richardson, of 
Sudbury, Mass. They have had two children: 
a daughter who died in childhood in 1877; 
and a son, Charles H. Sherman, who is one of 
the firm known as the Waltham Harness Com- 
pany. He married Ella Mitchell, and has one 
daughter, Laura Gladys. 



CSTSAAC STORY, son of Isaac and Sally 
hI Martin (Bowen) Story, was born in 
J_i_ Marblehead, Mass., November 4, 1818, 
being the second son among eleven 
children, five boys and six girls. When he 



was four years old his parents removed to 
Lynn, Mass., where he went through the usual 
course of study at the grammar school, and 
afterward attended the Lynn Academy, at that 
time an institution of considerable repute, 
having students not only from Boston and 
other cities and towns in Massachusetts, but 
from other States and from Mexico and Cuba. 
In 183s he entered Pierce Academy, Middle- 
boro, Mass., then under the charge of the 
Rev. Professor Briggs, formerly of Bowdoin 
College. Later for a while he served as 
teller in a bank, and after that he returned to 
Lynn Academy, and fitted for the Sophomore 
class in Brown University; but, owing to the 
financial disasters of the time (1837), he did 
not offer himself, but continued his studies 
through the regular course under private 
tutorship. 

In 1838, at the request of a friend who was 
ill, Mr. Story supplied his place for several 
weeks, or to the close of the winter term, as 
teacher of the grammar school at East Saugus. 
An interesting feature of that school was the 
publication, at intervals of a week or so, of a 
newspaper voluntarily edited in turn by sev- 
eral of the older girls, all neatly written out 
by their own hand, and carefully columned 
and spaced. Some of the numbers are still 
extant. 

In the winter of 1839 Mr. Story taught the 
grammar school on Spring Hill, Sandwich, 
Mass. ; and later in that year he became prin- 
cipal of the Franklin Academy, a German 
school in Kutztown, Berks County, Pa., since 
become the seat of the Keystone Normal 
School of that Commonwealth. From Kutz- 
town at the beginning of the next year he went 
to Woodville, Turner's Cross Roads, Bertie 
County, N.C., where he became the principal 
of the Bertie Union Academy, one of the larg- 
est, if not the largest academy in that State. 

In both these places he studied law in spare 
hours under the direction of the Hon. Samuel 
H. Perkins, a leading member of the Phila- 
delphia bar. At the close of the summer 
term he returned to Lynn, and was in the law 
office of the Hon. Thomas B. Newhall for a 
time, when he again went South, and taught 
the Ferry Neck School, Talbot County, east- 
ern shore of Maryland, continuing his law 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



studies under the direction of the Hon. John 
Bozman Kerr, of Easton (afterward member of 
Congress), whose father, the Hon. John Leeds 
Kerr, having the same law office, was then a 
United States Senator from Maryland. 

Leaving the South in January, 1843, he 
came to Boston, where his parents then re- 
sided, and became a student in the law office 
of the Hon. Charles Theodore Russell and 
subsequently in the office of Fuller & An- 
drew, composed of Henry Holton Fuller and 
John Albion Andrew, afterward Governor. 
From the latter office he was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar on the motion of Mr. Fuller, and 
commenced practice on his own account in an 
office with Mr. Russell. In May, 1845, he 
was admitted to practice in the United States 
Circuit and District Courts on motion of 
Franklin Dexter, Esq., then the United 
States District Attorney, on recommendation 
of the United States Bar of Massachusetts, as 
then required by the court. From that time, 
with the exception of one year's absence 
(1857-58), his law office was in Boston until 
his appointment. May 31, 1872, by Governor 
Washburn, as Standing Justice of the Police 
Court of Somerville, organized in June follow- 
ing. This office he still holds. 

From 1850 to 1853 he was in the same 
office with John A. Andrew, 4 Court Street, 
Boston; and Mr. Andrew was one of his 
groomsmen at his first marriage. Judge 
Story's first wife was Elizabeth Bowen Wood- 
bury, daughter of Captain Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Bowen) Woodbury, of Beverly, Mass. His 
second wife, now living, was Mary Ann 
Chase, daughter of Hezekiah and Sally (Hoyf) 
Chase, of Lynn. 

His first active interest in politics was in 
1852, when he became a member of the Web- 
ster State Executive Committee in the 
Webster Presidential campaign. Of this 
committee he is probably the only surviving 
member. As is well known, Daniel Webster 
died before the day of election, and all public 
demonstration on his behalf ceased ; but many 
of his friends voted for the electoral ticket 
that bore his name, both to show their appre- 
ciation of his distinguished merits and in vin- 
dication of the justness of the cause which led 
them to make him their standard bearer. In 



this calamity the whole question of the pur- 
pose and powers of Presidential electors was 
fully discussed. 

In May, 1853, Mr. Story removed from 
Boston to Somerville, where he has continued 
to reside with the exception of four years 
(1857-61), one in Salem and three in Boston. 
In 1856 he represented Somerville in the Gen- 
eral Court, the town then having but one Rep- 
resentative. In the fall of that year, in the 
Fillmore American Congressional Convention 
held for the district of which Somerville was 
a part, he was unanimously chosen, in his 
absence and without any knowledge on his 
part of such intention, as candidate of that 
party. 

In 1859 he was chairman of the State Ex- 
ecutive Committee and of the Suffolk County 
Committee of the Opposition Party, so called 
— that is, of the party opposed to the then 
methods of both the Republican and Demo- 
cratic parties, its candidate for Governor being 
George N. Briggs, of Pittsfield, who had pre- 
viously been a very acceptable Governor of 
Massachusetts during several years. He was 
also engaged in the Bell and Everett Presi- 
dential campaign. During his political ac- 
tivity he had several offers of assured official 
preferment, which for personal reasons he de- 
clined. His present official position was ac- 
cepted at the request of members of the bar 
regardless of party. During several years he 
was a member of the School Committee of 
the town of Somerville. 

His father, Isaac Story, when a young man, 
was for several years secretary to the British 
resident in Mocha in Arabia. He com- 
manded the Marblehead Light Infantry in the 
War of 1812 with Great Britain. His pater- 
nal grandfather. Dr. Elisha Story, was born 
in Boston, and was one of the so-called "Ind- 
ians " that threw the tea overboard. He led 
a party who captured two brass field pieces 
from the British sentry at or near what is now 
the Park Street entrance to Boston Common, 
and afterward became surgeon in Colonel 
Little's Essex County regiment, whereas his 
father, William Story, Esq., who married a 
daughter of Joseph Marion, of Boston, was 
Register of Admiralty in that place at the 
breaking out of the Revolution, and it was to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his office that the stamps, issued under the 
famous Stamp Act, were erroneously supposed 
to have come. 

Judge Story's maternal grandfather, Nathan 
Bowen, of Marblehead, was Orderly Sergeant 
in a Marblehead company in the Revolution- 
ary War, for some time stationed on Winter 
Hill in that part of Charlestown now forming 
Somerville, to guard the Hessian troops taken 
at Rurgoyne's surrender. He was subse- 
quently made Lieutenant, going to Tiverton, 
R. L At the end of his term of service he re- 
turned to Marblehead, and upon the death of 
his father, Edward Bowen, succeeded him as 
a magistrate, holding office for more than 
forty years, until his death in 1837. He was 
a Deacon in the Old South Congregational 
Church there for many years. 

While the British held possession of Bos- 
ton, Dr. Elisha Story removed with his family 
to Maiden, where were born his two youngest 
children by his first wife, Ruth Ruddock, 
daughter of Major John Ruddock, of Boston. 
During the war Dr. Story removed to Marble- 
head, then a busy place; and there in 1778 
his wife, Ruth, died, having been the mother 
of ten children. He afterward married Me- 
hitable Pedrick, daughter of Major John Ped- 
rick, of Marblehead; and by her he had eleven 
children, the eldest son by that marriage 
being Joseph Story, the celebrated jurist, who 
was one of the Associate Justices of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, and Dane 
professor of law in Harvard College. The 
second son was Isaac Story, father of the sub- 
ject of this biography and of his only surviv- 
ing brother, the present Hon. Joseph Story, 
of Boston. 

Judge Story by his first wife had ten chil- 
dren, three of whom survive, namely: Profes- 
sor William E. Story, at the head of the 
mathematical department of Clark University 
at Worcester; Frederick Washington Story, 
lawyer, and for the past two years Examiner 
of Titles for the city of Baltimore, Md. ; and 
Isaac Marion Story, civil engineer, and at 
present a Councilman of the city of Somer- 
ville. 

From January, 1843, to the present time, 
he has made special research into the history 
of ancient Egypt and of the ancient Meso- 



potamian kingdoms, making use of the revela- 
tions of the ancient monuments, the result of 
which has been the construction of a chrono- 
logical chart, containing among other names 
the whole of the royal list of Manetho's Egyp- 
tian dynasties, thus confirming to his judicial 
mind the generations and numbers of the Old 
Testament history, and disproving the exag- 
gerated chronology of the so-called modern 
critics, now so generally promulgated. This 
Judge Story considers the most important and 
valuable of his life work. 



ENRY ORLANDO MARCY, 
A.M., M.D., LL.D., of Boston, the 
pioneer of antiseptic surgery in this 
country, was born June 23, 1837, in 
Otis, Berkshire County, Mass., being the son 
of Smith and Fanny (Gibbs) Marcy. He is of 
the sixth generation in descent from John 
Marcy, immigrant, who married Sarah Had- 
lock, in Roxbury, Mass., settled at Wood- 
stock, Conn., and died in 1724, aged about 
sixty-two years. 

Joseph Marcy, son of John and Sarah, was 
the father of Smith, first, a native of Wood- 
stock, who, some time after his marriage, re- 
moved with his family to Otis. His son, 
Thomas, born at Woodstock in 1770, migrated 
in 1828 from Otis to Freedom, Portage 
County, Ohio, where he was one of the earli- 
est inhabitants, and did much to promote the 
growth of the new settlement, making the 
round trip eighteen times, with his own 
team, transporting other families with their 
goods. He died in i860, aged ninety years. 
His wife was Elizabeth M. Lawton. (See 
Neiv England Historic Genealogical Register^ 
vol. xxix.) 

Dr. Marcy's father. Smith Marcy, second, 
son of Thomas, was a teacher by profession. 
He served in the War of 1812. His wife, 
Fanny, the Doctor's mother, was the daughter 
of Elijah Gibbs and grand-daughter of Israel 
Gibbs, both of whom served in the American 
Revolution, and were with General Gates at 
the surrender of General Burgoyne. 

Henry Orlando Marcy fitted for college at 
Wilbraham Academy, received his degree of 
A.M. at Amherst, and was graduated from 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Harvard Medical School in 1863. In 
April of the same year he was commissioned 
assistant surgeon of the Forty-third Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, and in November was 
commissioned surgeon of the first regiment of 
colored troops recruited in North Carolina. 
In 1864 he was appointed medical director of 
Florida, and served on the staffs of Generals 
Van Wyck, Potter, and Hatch, resigning his 
commission in June, 1865, his last special 
service being the sanitary renovation of 
Charleston, S.C. 

After the close of the war Dr. Marcy en- 
tered upon the practice of medicine in Cam- 
bridge. In the spring of 1869 he went to 
Berlin, Prussia, and spent a year at the uni- 
versity as a special student of Professors Mar- 
tin and Virchow. He afterward familiarized 
himself with the hospital service of the differ- 
ent European cities, spending the summer in 
London and in Edinburgh, where he became 
the first American pupil of Professor Lister. 
Convinced of the correctness of his teaching, 
he immediately, upon returning to the United 
States, devoted himself to the introduction of 
the antiseptic methods of wound treatment. 
To this end he equipped a laboratory, obtained 
the services of competent assistants, and de- 
voted ten years to the continuous study of the 
micro-organisms found in wounds, their culti- 
vation in various media, their reproduction in 
animals, etc., publishing from time to time 
the results of these observations. He made a 
series of investigations upon the repair proc- 
esses of osseous structures, extending over a 
period of two years. Rabbits were used for 
experimental study, the animals being ex- 
amined at selected dates, until a complete 
series was secured, showing the intermediate 
processes of repair. He was assisted by Sur- 
geon-general Holt, and after many experi- 
ments the injection apparatus now generally 
used was devised in 1878. 

In 1870 Dr. Marcy familiarized himself 
with the practice of Professor Lister in the 
ligation of arteries in continuity by the use 
of the buried' catgut ligature. Instituting a 
series of laboratory studies, burying sutures in 
various animals, and studying the resulting 
histological conditions, he demonstrated that 
catgut and the tendons of animals aseptically 



buried in aseptic wounds were invariably fol- 
lowed by primary union ; that the foreign ma- 
terial thus buried was surrounded with leu- 
cocytes and invaded by them; that little by 
little vascularity followed, thus the suture 
being replaced in large degree by a band of 
living connective tissue. Dr. Marcy pub- 
lished the result of these investigations, and a 
considerable number of new operations were 
devised as the result of such suturing. 

Having demonstrated the inherent defects 
of catgut as a suture material in 1880, after a 
careful study of the connective-tissue struct- 
ures of a large number of animals, his re- 
searches in comparative anatomy led to the 
examination of the tendons of the tail of the 
kangaroo. These have been found superior to 
any other material for sutures, and are in gen- 
eral use. 

In 1880 Dr. Marcy established a private 
hospital in Cambridge for the treatment of the 
surgical diseases of women, in order to de- 
monstrate the value of the modern surgical 
technique. This is continued to the present, 
and it is here that he has worked out in the 
larger share the methods of wound treatment 
contributed to the profession. 

In 1863 Dr. Marcy married Miss Sarah E. 
Wendell, of Somersworth, N. H. They reside 
at 180 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 
Their son, Henry O. Marcy, Jr., is a graduate 
of medicine. 

To Dr. Marcy is undoubtedly due the credit 
of introducing into America the methods of 
antiseptic wound treatment; and it is a well- 
known fact that his original studies greatly 
improved upon the same, and contributed 
largely in placing them upon their present 
scientific basis. His own best contribution to 
surgery thus far may be said to have been 
"the introduction and establishment of the 
value of the buried animal-suture," whose im- 
portance is appreciated by every aseptic oper- 
ator. "The operations most generally ac- 
cepted of his especial teaching are the closure 
of all aseptic wounds in layers without drain- 
age, and the reconstruction of the inguinal 
canal for the cure of hernia, which latter oper- 
ation was not possible until the introduction 
of the buried suture." 

Dr. Marcy participated in the Seventh In- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ternational Medical Congress, London, 1881, 
and was president of the section in gynEccol- 
ogy of the Ninth International Medical Con- 
gress, Washington, D.C., 1887. He is a 
member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, was vice-president in 1879, chairman of 
the section in obstetrics in 1882, a member 
of the Judicial Council, 1886-89, was elected 
president in 1891, and presided over the De- 
troit meeting, June, 1892. He is also a 
member of the American Academy of Medi- 
cine, of which he was president in 18S4, also 
of various other medical and scientific organi- 
zations both in Europe and in America. 

The Wesleyan University in 1887 conferred 
upon Dr. Marcy the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws. He has made numerous valuable 
contributions to^the medical literature of the 
day, and a list of his works may be found in 
"Physicians and Surgeons of America," to 
which we are indebted for the most of the 
foregoing biographical sketch. 



/[J)eORGE albert STACY, superin- 
l jjjT tendent of the Marlboro Water 
Works and an expert mechanical 
engineer, was born in Northboro, Mass., Oc- 
tober 2, 1848, son of Albert Holland and 
Mary A. (Bride) Stacy. His mother was 
from Berlin, Mass. His father, who was a 
native of Northboro, was employed in com- 
pounding and selling medicines in Boston and 
vicinity until he enlisted, August 16, 1861, 
as a private in Company K, Sixteenth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, and went 
South to aid in putting down the Rebellion. 
He served in the Peninsular Campaign, under 
General McClellan, and was killed at Warren- 
ton Junction, Va., August 27, 1862. 

Two children were born to Mr. Stacy's par- 
ents, but he was the only one that grew to 
maturity. He acquired a public-school edu- 
cation, and after leaving school was employed 
in a pencil factory, in a cotton-mill, and in 
other occupations until 1865, when he began 
to serve an apprenticeship at the machinist's 
trade in Winchendon, Mass. As a journey- 
man he was employed a short time by the 
Lowell Machine Company and the Weed File 
Company, and was with the Hoe Press Com- 



pany in Boston until their removal to New 
York. After working at his trade in Hudson 
and Marlboro until 1877, he was for the suc- 
ceeding six years chief engineer for the Boyd 
& Corey Manufacturing Company. In 1883, 
when the water works were commenced, he 
was engaged as pumping engineer. A short 
time later he was appointed chief inspector, 
and in the fall was made superintendent. 
Since taking charge of the works, he has laid 
twenty-two miles of pipe, making a total of 
thirty-eight miles of water mains, two pump- 
ing stations, three pumping engines, with a 
capacity of seven million gallons, and three 
reservoirs, under his care; has constructed a 
large dam, a storage reservoir, with capacity 
of three hundred and sixty million gallons, 
and erected a new pumping station, with 
pumping engines and stand-pipe, the works 
representing an outlay of nearly a half-million 
dollars. He was a member of the Sewer 
Commission and superintendent of construc- 
tion one and one-half years in addition to his 
work as superintendent of the Water Depart- 
ment. He has served on the Board of En- 
gineers fifteen years, was its clerk several 
terms, was Chief of the Fire Department one 
year, and was a member of the committee ap- 
pointed to introduce the fire alarm system, 
and served as its superintendent for three 
years. 

He is a Past Master of United Brethren 
Lodge, F. & A. M.; a member of Houghton 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Hiram Coun- 
cil, Royal and Select Masters, and Trinity 
Commandery, Knights Templar; and was Dis- 
trict Deputy of the Twenty-first Masonic Dis- 
trict for two years. He is a Past Chancellor 
of Marlboro Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and 
was District Deputy for two terms; is a mem- 
ber of the Improved Order of Red Men, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the 
National Association of Stationary Engi- 
neers. He was president of the New Eng- 
land Water Works Association in 1895, and 
has read some interesting papers upon timely 
topics at its meetings. 

Mr. Stacy married Harriet Howe Barnes, 
daughter of William Barnes, of this city. 
His only daughter, Alice Stacy, died in 1873, 
aged ten months. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



m 



;LLIAM TAYLOR RICHARD- 
SON, for many years a well-known 
business man of Cambridge, was 
born in the city of Boston, November 7, 1815, 
and was the eldest child of William T. and 
Hannah (Bales) Richardson, His father was 
probably born in Boston. His mother was a 
native of Wilton, N.H. They had three other 
children, namely: Isabella W, born July i, 
1 8 18, who died in infancy; Thomas, who was 
born in 1820, and died at the age of twenty- 
one years; and Isabella (second), born Novem- 
ber 13, 1822, died September 14, 1823. 

William Taylor Richardson was seven years 
old when his father died, and he was taken to 
his mother's people in Wilton, where he re- 
mained until eleven years of age, there receiv- 
ing his elementary education. From that 
time until he was seventeen years of age he 
lived in a farmer's family in Groton, j\4ass., 
working on the farm and attending school. 
In 1832 he was hired by a Mr. Coolidge, a 
farmer of Watertown, Mass., with whom he 
stayed until twenty-one years of age. In 
1836 he obtained a position as clerk and sales- 
man in the grocery store of Hastings & 
Holmes, Cambridge, which he held two years. 
He then entered the employ of Deacon Levi 
Farwell, bursar of Harvard College, and was 
principally engaged in looking after the wharf 
at the foot of Dunster Street and Charles 
River Bank, where in that early day all the 
wood and coal and supplies were landed. In 
1840 Mr. Richardson hired the wharf from the 
college corporation, and he managed it from 
that time until his death. 

A man of marked ability, capable and dis- 
criminating in financial matters, he was con- 
nected with a number of important enterprises 
in Cambridge. He was a director of the 
Charles River Bank and of the Cambridge 
Mutual Fire Insurance Com.pany. One of the 
original members of the Old Cambridge Bap- 
tist Church, he was clerk of the church and 
was superintendent of the Sunday-school many 
years. He died July 18, 1896. 

In 1842 Mr. Richardson was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Harriot Valentine, a native of 
Westbrook, Me. Her parents were Joseph 
and Patty (Burnap) Valentine, and her grand- 
parents, William and Elizabeth (Jones) Val- 



entine, of Hopkinton, Mass. Three children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Richardson: Will- 
iam T., Jr., who died at the age of eighteen; 
and Joseph V. and Anna, who both are living 
with their mother in Cambridge. 



RTHUR H. SMITH, founder and 
proprietor of the extensive grocery 
and provision establishment known 
as the Manhattan Market, which is 
located on Massachusetts Avenue, near Cen- 
tral Square, Cambridge, was born in London, 
England. His parents were both natives of 
London; and his father, Charles S. Sinith, 
who carried on a very extensive butcher busi- 
ness on Caledonia Road in the British metrop- 
olis, is now in business in New York. 

Arthur H. Smith, coming to the United 
States in his early youth, settled in White- 
stone, L.I. At the age of fourteen he 
shipped as mess-room boy on board the steam- 
ship " Flamboro," which plied between New 
York and the West India Islands. He was 
soon advanced to the position of second stew- 
ard, but at the end of eighteen months he de- 
cided to remain on shore. After working for 
the John T. Locke Manufacturing Company 
for a short time, he adopted his father's busi- 
ness, commencing it in a small way. Later 
he moved to Flushing; and from Flushing he 
went to Boston, where he was employed for a 
year in a market on Pleasant Street. He 
next worked nine months for George Everett 
in Milton, and during the succeeding year for 
A. F. Stratton on Main Street, Cambridge. 
After his marriage Mr. Smith decided to go 
into business for himself; and with borrowed 
money he purchased the Pleasant Street 
market, which was then conducted by Mr. 
Sargent, one of his former employers. Busi- 
ness increased to such an extent that his eigh- 
teen-by-twenty-feet floor space was too small, 
and he annexed the adjoining store. From 
this small beginning rose what became known 
as the "Mammoth Grocery and Provision 
House," of which Mr. Smith was proprietor 
for ten years. 

With a desire to still further enlarge his 
business, he negotiated for the erection of his 
present building on Massachusetts Avenue; 




WILLIAM T. RICHARDSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and the Manhattan Market was opened Au- 
gust 26, 1895. The interior is finished in 
quartered oak and marble, one side being de- 
voted to groceries, while the other contains 
the provision department. A twenty-horse- 
power engine in the basement furnishes one 
hundred and twenty-five sixteen-candle-power 
incandescent lights, and also operates machin- 
ery which produces six tons of ice in twenty- 
four hours. The engine is automatic, and 
run by gasoline. The Manhattan Market has 
an area of forty-six by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet. It employs thirty-five clerks 
and helpers, four women book-keepers, and 
twelve teams, and is doing a business of two 
hundred and seventy -five thousand dollars per 
year. Mr. Smith sold the Pleasant Street 
market some three months after opening the 
Manhattan, and has since given his entire at- 
tention to his present enterprise. 

Mr. Smith is a member of Amicable Lodge, 
F. & A. M.; Cambridge Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; and Cambridge Commandery, Knights 
Templar. He is also connected with the 
Sons of St. George, the United Order of Pil- 
grim Fathers, and the Home Circle. 



"ON. CHARLES WILLIAM HEN- 
DERSON, of Cambridgeport, was 
born on Cambridge Street, in the 
city of Boston, June 3, 1842, son 
of William and Rebecca Maria (Richards) 
Henderson. His paternal grandfather, a na- 
tive of Dover, N.H., had but two children — 
William and Amelia. The latter became the 
wife of William Simons, of Boston. Will- 
iam Henderson, also born in Dover, N.H., 
was engaged in the cotton waste and paper 
stock business in Boston. His wife previous 
to her marriage was a resident of Rochester, 
N.H. Ten children were born to them, three 
of whom are living — Eliza Ann, Frances 
Allen, and Charles William. 

Charles William Henderson passed the first 
twelve years of his life in Boston, and at- 
tended the Phillips School in that city. His 
parents m.oving to Cambridge, he subsequently 
attended the Webster School there. At the 
age of fourteen he began to work with his 
father in the cotton waste and paper stock 



business, and at the age of twenty-two he 
started in business for himself. Mr. Hender- 
son is actively interested in the affairs of the 
city and county. He served in the Common 
Council four years, beginning with 1880, was 
two years on the Board of Aldermen, and was 
in the State legislature in 1887, 1890, and 
1891. 

In 1S64 he was married to Miss Hannah 
Augusta Martin, daughter of James A. Mar- 
tin, of Cambridgeport; and he has two sons 
— Charles W. and Harry A., who are in 
business in Boston. Charles W. married 
Anna, daughter of David Atwood; and Harry 
A. married Miss Frances Simpson. Mr. 
Henderson is a member of Amicable Lodge, 
F. & A. M., and Cambridge Chapter. He is 
an Odd Fellow, and belongs also to the Royal 
Arcanum. He and his wife are members of 
the Universalist church. 



LPHONSO HOLLAND CARVILL, 
M.D., one of the leading physicians 
of Somerville, residing at 28 High- 
land Avenue, was born in Lewiston, 
Me., on February 4, 1843, son of Sewall and 
Tamar (Higgins) Carvill. He is of mingled 
Scotch and English ancestry. His great- 
grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution. 
His grandfather, who was born in Portland, 
was a farmer. He followed that occupation 
for many years in Lewiston, and died in that 
city at an advanced age. He had a family of 
seven children. 

Sewall Carvill was brought up on a farm, 
and in his young manhood he learned the 
trade of carriage-maker. He was a skilful 
mechanic. He served in the War of 181 2, 
but spent the greater part of his life on the 
homestead in Lewiston. His wife, who was 
born in Lewiston, became the mother of thir- 
teen children, of whom seven are living. 
She died at the age of eighty-seven years. 
Both she and her husband were attendants of 
the Universalist church. 

Alphonso H. Carvill was the youngest of 
the thirteen children born to his parents. He 
spent his early life in Lewiston, attending 
either the public schools or a private school. 
From 1858 to 1861 he was for several terms at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Maine State Seminary, and in 1861 he en- 
tered the Edward Little Institute at Auburn, 
Me., where he fitted for college. In 1866 he 
was graduated at Tufts College, after having 
taken a four years' classical course. Three 
years later he received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the Harvard Medical School, 
and the degree of Master of Arts from Tufts 
College. After studying further in New 
York, Philadelphia, and Chicago, he settled 
in Minnesota for the practice of his profes- 
sion, and remained there for a number of 
years. In 1873 he came to Somerville, where 
he has since been engaged in active practice, 
being now one of the oldest physicians in the 
city. Dr. Carvill has seen the city double in 
population since he came here, and has fol- 
lowed with interest the remarkable develop- 
ment of its industrial and commercial affairs. 
He was connected with the Somerville Hospi- 
tal as one of the leaders in securing its estab- 
lishment, being a member of the Building 
Committee, one of the Board of Trustees from 
the beginning, and member of the Medical 
Board and Hospital Staff. He has been two 
years city physician of Somerville. He is a 
member of the American Institute of Homoe- 
opathy, of the Massachusetts Homoeopathic 
Medical Society, the Boston Homoeopathic 
Society, and the Massachusetts Surgical and 
Gynascological Society. For ten years he was 
a member of the School Board of Somerville, 
and he continues to take great interest in edu- 
cational affairs. While he was on the School 
Board he was a member of the subcommittee 
of the Pope School and of the Knapp School, 
both of which were built during that time; 
and many of the features which make these 
two buildings so well adapted for their pur- 
pose were suggested by Dr. Carvill. He 
exerted all his influence in behalf of the pres- 
ent High and Latin School, which is one of 
the institutions of which Somerville may 
justly be proud. Dr. Carvill is greatly inter- 
ested in the subject of temperance. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. 

In 1869 Dr. Carvill was united in marriage 
with Miss Minna S., daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Swanson) Gray, of Cambridge, 
formerly of Scotland. Mrs. Carvill was one 
of a family of three children. She is the 



mother of one son, Sewall Albert Carvill, 
now employed in the ticket office at the Union 
Station in Boston, and a daughter, Lizzie 
Maud Carvill, who is now (April, i8g8) a 
member of the Senior class of Tufts College. 

Dr. Carvill is a member of John Abbott 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Somerville and of the 
Royal Arch Chapter; also of Highland Chap- 
ter, No. 55, Order of the Eastern Star. He is 
medical examiner for the Royal Arcanum. 
He has written to some extent for various 
medical magazines and periodicals. He at- 
tends the Universalist church, and is on the 
Standing Committee of the parish. 



(s>rLBERT THOMPSON, an artist of es- 

t^ tablished reputation as a landscape, 

yj^\ portrait, and figure painter, resides 

^■"^ in Woburn, Mass., where he was 

born on the i8th of March, 1853. 

His father, the late Alpha Elbridge Thomp- 
son, was born in 181 5 in Mount Vernon, 
N.H., and came from there to Woburn when a 
boy. Very soon afterward he found employ- 
ment in the general merchandise store of 
Colonel John Waide. In the same establish- 
ment he remained until his death, in 1892, 
having been first a clerk, then a partner, and 
finally sole proprietor of the business. A 
man of sterling integrity and widely known, 
he was prominent in public affairs. He served 
as clerk and as chairman of the Town Board of 
Selectmen. At one time he was candidate on 
the Democratic ticket for State Senator, and at 
another for Lieutenant Governor, but was de- 
feated in both cases. During the war he was 
a recruiting officer. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Unitarian parish. He married 
Mary, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Green) 
Hill, and by this union had two children, 
namely: Albert, the special subject of this 
sketch; and Mary Enna, who married John 
Albert Reynolds, formerly of Woburn, but 
later of Cambridgeport, Mass., and died in 
May, 1892. 

Albert Thompson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Woburn, and while yet a boy 
showed a natural taste for drawing. At the 
age of sixteen he was receiving instruction in 







JOSEPH J. GILES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



painting in Boston from Mr. George F. Hig- 
gins and Mr. Virgil Williams. He also drew 
in a "life class" at the Lowell Institute, and 
likewise attended a class in anatomy under 
Dr. Rimmer. At a later period he studied 
with William E. Norton, from whom he 
learned among other things a system of 
perspective drawing, which he afterward ampli- 
fied and published in a simple form for begin- 
ners, under the title, "Principles of Perspec- 
tives." In 1872 Mr. Thompson visited many 
famous art galleries in Europe, and on his re- 
turn to this country he opened a studio in 
Boston, where he painted and e.xhibited pict- 
ures, chiefly landscapes. 

In 1875, in company with J. Foxcroft Cole 
and E. L. Weeks, Mr. Thompson went to 
Normandy, and, after spending a time there 
engaged in sketching, he went to Paris and 
thence to Italy. Returning again to Boston, 
he exhibited pictures in which more attention 
was paid to figures, and he gradually became 
noted as a painter of cattle. Feeling, how- 
ever, the need of academic study, Mr. Thomp- 
son returned to Paris in 1880, and entered the 
famous Julien School, where he enjoyed the 
instruction of Jules Lefebvre and G. Bou- 
langer. _ He also attended lectures on anatomy 
at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, thus further fit- 
ting himself for his profession. Since his 
return Mr. Thompson has produced many 
landscape paintings with cattle, in depicting 
which he excels, a strong point also being 
his "knowing just where to place them"; 
and he has also availed himself of his study of 
the human figure in portrait and figure work. 

In the summer of 1894 he was commis- 
sioned by Leonard Thompson to paint an his- 
torical picture representing the ordination of 
Thomas Carter in 1642 as the first minister 
of Woburn. The work was begun in Novem- 
ber, 1894, and on its completion in June, 
1895, was presented to the Woburn Library. 
Mr. Thompson subsequently received a com- 
mission from the same gentleman to paint a 
portrait of the Hon. John Cummings, presi- 
dent of the Board of Library Trustees. This 
also he accomplished most satisfactorily, and 
in October, 1896, it was presented to the li- 
brary. Some of his other admirable work 
may be seen in Parker L. Converse's "Le- 



gends of Woburn," a portion of which he 
illustrated. Mr. Thompson now has his 
studio in Woburn, where he is an esteemed 
citizen and one of the active members of the 
Board of Library Trustees. 



§'OSEPH J. GILES, a prominent real 
estate and insurance broker of Somer- 
ville, was born in March, 1842, near 
the site of the present Union Square, 
his birth being the first in the town after its 
incorporation. His parents were John B. and 
Olive (Burrell) Giles. His paternal grand- 
father was Soloman Giles, probably a farmer, 
one of two brothers who settled in New 
Hampshire in pioneer days. 

John B. Giles was a stone-cutter, and re- 
sided when a young man in Brookfield, N.H. 
He subsequently went to Ogdensburg, N.Y., 
where he took a conspicuous part in town 
affairs, and served with credit on the School 
Board. Some time later he removed by ox 
team from Ogdensburg to Boston, and, open- 
ing a hotel in that city, there remained in 
business for a number of years. He subse- 
quently came to Soraerville, then a part of 
Charlestown, and did some unusually fine 
work at the marble cutting business, being a 
highly skilled artisan. He resided here till 
his death, in 1866, or a period of about thirty- 
five years in all. In politics a Democrat 
up to the time of Lincoln's nomination, 
after that he voted the Republican ticket. 
His wife, Olive, who lived to be sixty-five 
years of age, was born in Scituate, Mass., and 
was one of a family of several children. Her 
father, Isaac Burrell, was a farmer. He lived 
to be a very old man, and died at Scituate. 
Mrs. Giles iDecame the mother of six children, 
all of whom grew to maturity, and three of 
whom are living; Mary Olive, Isaac B., and 
Joseph J. One daughter, Anna H., died on 
a trip abroad, and was buried in Germany. 
Mary Olive Giles was for many years a well- 
known teacher of Somerville. She married 
Isaac Barker, and resides in San Francisco. 
Her husband was a former member of the 
Somerville Light Infantry, and went into ser- 
vice in 1861 in Company I of the Fifth Mas- 
sachusetts Regiment, and was at the first battle 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Bull Run. Isaac B. Giles is a miner in 
Idaho. Mr. and Mrs. John B. Giles were 
members of the Universalist church. 

Joseph J. Giles obtained his education in 
the public schools of Somerville, completing 
his course of study in the old high school 
building, which is the present city hall. In 
April, 1861, after the breaking out of the 
Rebellion, he went to the front with the 
Somerville Light Infantry in Company I of 
the Fifth Regiment, and was in the first 
battle of Bull Run. In August, 1862, he 
enlisted for three years in the Somerville 
Guard, Company E, Thirty-ninth Regiment, 
and was commissioned as its First Lieutenant. 
He subsequently served eleven months as an 
Aide-de-camp to General Martindale, who was 
military governor of Washington, D.C. In 
1 89 1 and 1892 Mr. Giles represented Somer- 
ville in the legislature, and served on the 
Committees on Insurance, Administrative 
Boards, and Commissions. He has been en- 
gaged in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness in Union' Square since 1876, and has 
gained an unusually large circle of friends 
among the residents of Somerville. His resi- 
dence is at 34 Putnam Street. 

Mr. Giles was married in November, 1866, 
to Lucy M. Welch, daughter of Abraham and 
Martha (Underwood) Welch, and one of a 
family of three children. Her father was for 
many years Superintendent of Streets, Over- 
seer of the Poor, and' Fire Engineer, and a 
very prominent resident of the town. Mrs. 
Lucy M. Welch Giles died on July 12, 1895, 
at the age of fifty-one years. Mr. Giles mar- 
ried for his second wife Lizzie L. Jaynes, 
who was born in Charlestown. Mr. and Mrs. 
Giles attend the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and liberally assist in its support. 

Mr. Giles is known as a man who is always 
ready to help in the furtherance of any move- 
ment looking to the general welfare, and 
whose charities are many and varied. He is 
a member of John Abbot Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of Somerville; of Oasis Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; 
of the American Order of United Workmen ; 
of the Royal Arcanum, Benevolent Order of 
Protection; of the Good Fellows; of the 
Massachusetts Benefit Aid and Provident Aid 
Society; of the American Temperance Life 



Association; and of the Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion. 



RTHUR OILMAN, the first regent of 
Radcliffe College, director of The 
Cambridge School for Young 
Ladies and author of "The Story 
of the Saracens " and other standard works, 
was born in Alton, 111., June 22, 1837. His 
parents were Winthrop Sargent and Abia 
Swift (Lippincott) Oilman. The family is 
of Welsh origin, but at a remote period ances- 
tors of Mr. Oilman migrated from Wales to 
England; and in 1638 Edward Oilman, the 
founder of the Am.erican branch, left Nor- 
folk, England, for Boston, Mass., where he 
arrived in August. His son, John Oilman, 
known as Councillor John, was an early settler 
at Exeter, N.H., and was a prominent citizen 
of that province, holding various public 
ofifices. Among his descendants may be 
named John Taylor Oilman, who was for four- 
teen years Governor of New Hampshire, and 
Mr. Arthur Oilman's great-grandfather, Jo- 
seph Oilman, also of Exeter, N. H., who was 
on the Colonial Committee of Safety at the 
time of the Revolution, and was State Sena- 
tor 1784-87. 

Arthur Oilman was educated in St. Louis 
and New York, and received the honorary de- 
gree of Master of Arts from Williams Col- 
lege. In 1857 he engaged in business as a 
banker in New York City, and five years 
later, on account of failing health, removed 
to the neighborhood of Lenox, Mass., giving 
his attention while there to educational and 
philanthropic work. In 1870, moving to 
Cambridge, he became connected with the 
Riverside Press. In 1871 he was one of the 
editors of the American Tract Society in 
Boston. In 1876, with his wife, a lady of 
culture, rare charm of manner, and much ex- 
ecutive ability, he evolved a plan from which 
was developed the "Harvard Annex," or Rad- 
cliffe College of to-day. The plan first took 
form as " the Society for the Collegiate In- 
struction of Women," which, when the first 
announcement was issued, on Washington's 
Birthday, 1879, had no funds, no grounds, 
no buildings, no regular faculty. Mr. Oilman 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had aroused the interest of Professor Green- 
oiigh, of Harvard, who was the first of the 
college professors to counsel and aid the en- 
terprise; and others of the Harvard faculty 
had offered their services free of expense 
rather than see the project abandoned. Mr. 
Oilman modestly claims that the success of 
the plan was largely due to his wife, who 
was "unusually persistent" and indefatigable 
in her zeal. The high rank which Rad- 
cliffe holds to-day among educational institu- 
tions for women is due to the generosity of 
the older college, which has supplied freely 
the best of teachers and lecturers, and opened 
its library to the young lady students. Mr. 
Oilman was the executive officer of the Annex 
for eighteen years. In 1896 he resigned his 
position as regent of RadclifEe, to give his 
entire attention to The Cambridge School for 
Young Ladies. 

This school is a model institution, planned 
by Mr. Oilman and his wife, who, having 
daughters of their own, have given much 
thought to the higher education of women. 
In most institutions the pupil is fitted to the 
course of study, and the weak fall behind, 
those stronger, yet not fully up to the require- 
ments, struggle painfully, and the "stars" 
slip easily through the curriculum. In Mr. 
Oilman's school the course of study is adapted 
to the pupil. This makes the classes neces- 
sarily small and the teachers many. The 
school has proved a flattering success, and the 
names of pupils from all over the Union are 
enrolled upon its catalogue. The school has 
no rule but the Oolden Rule, and there are no 
marks for deportment. The motto, in Chau- 
cer's quaint English, is "Truthe and Gentil 
Dedes." The institution works not alone for 
college preparation, but aims to give every 
girl what she needs along the broadest lines. 
The building has all modern improvements, 
and is equipped with laboratories for chemis- 
try, physics, and zoology. The teachers, who 
are all specialists, a,re free to teach as experi- 
ence dictates and to adopt late improvements. 
By the courtesy of Harvard, many lectures of 
the college are free to the pupils, and they 
have access to the museums and collections of 
the University. Pupils away from home live 
in small groups under the direction of a "house 



mother" and an assistant, accustomed to the 
refinements of the best American life. Thus 
the girl is educated socially and morally as 
well as mentally. 

Mr. Oilman is especially well versed in 
English literature and history. He bas 
written much for the periodical press, and has 
published in book form "The Oilman Family 
traced in the Line of the Hon. John Oilman, 
of Exeter, N.H." (Albany, N.Y., 1869); 
"First Steps in English Literature" (Boston, 
1870); "Kings, Queens, and Barbarians; or, 
Talks about Seven Historic Ages" (1870); 
"First Steps in Oeneral History: A Sugges- 
tive Outline" (1874) ; "Shakspeare's Morals, 
with Brief Collateral Readings and Scriptural 
References" (New York, 1879); "History of 
the American People" (Boston, 1883); "Tales 
of the Pathfinders" (1884); "The Story of 
Rome" (New York and London, 1885; pub- 
lished in the Oujeranti language in Bombay 
in 1896); "Short Stories from the Diction- 
ary" (Boston, 1886); and "Story of the Sara- 
cens " (New York and London, 1886; also 
published in Bombay, and also printed in two 
large volumes, in raised letters, for the blind, 
in 1892). He has edited and contributed to 
"Boston, Past and Present" (Boston, 1873); 
" Library of Religious Poetry ' ' (New York and 
London, 1880); "The Kingdom of Home: 
Homely Poems for Home Lovers " (Boston, 
188 1); "Magna Charta Stories" (Boston and 
London, 1882); "The Story of the Nations 
Series"; and "An Index to the Complete Edi- 
tion of the Works of Samuel Taylor Cole- 
ridge" (New York, 1884). He has edited 
"The Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer," to 
which are appended poems attributed to 
Chaucer (three volumes, Houghton & Miffiin, 
Boston and London, 1879). ^n this work ap- 
pears for the first time for the general reader 
the famous EUesmere text of the "Canter- 
bury Tales." He has written brief lives of 
Holmes, Higginson, and others, and contrib- 
uted to the Atlantic Montlily, Onr Yoking Folks, 
the Riverside Magazine, and the Century. He 
edited "The Cambridge of 1876" and "The 
Cambridge of 1896." 

Mr. Oilman was married first, April 12, 
i860, to Miss Amy Cooke, youngest daughter 
of the late Samuel Ball, of Lee, Mass. Mr, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Gilman was married a second time, July ii, 
1876, by Bishop Brooks, in Christ Church, 
Cambridge, to Miss Stella Scott, a native 
of Alabama. Mrs. Gilman is the author 
of "The Mother's Record" (Boston) and 
"Mothers in Council"' (New York, 1884). 
Mr. Gilman has been for the past sixteen 
years secretary of the Cambridge Humane 
Society; is secretary of the Longfellow Me- 
morial Association; a member of the Wiscon- 
sin Historical Society and the New York 
Agricultural Society; and a life member of 
the American Historical Association, whose 
headquarters are in Washington City. He is 
a member of the Board of Visitors of the 
Episcopal Theological Seminary of Cam- 
bridge, and was for a time on the Wellesley 
Board of Visitors. One of the endowments 
of Radcliffe is the "Arthur Gilman Book 
Fund," contributed by the young ladies of 
Radcliffe and The Cambridge School as a 
Christmas gift to Mr. Gilman in 1896. The 
interest of the fund is to be applied to the 
purchase of books on history, which Mr. Gil- 
man is to choose. The book-plate, besides 
the design that is in all the Radcliffe plates, 
bears the inscription: " Radcliffe College Li- 
brary. From Students and Friends of Radcliffe 
College, in grateful appreciation of the ser- 
vices of Arthur Gilman. MDCCCLXXVHI- 
MDCCCXCVL" 



'TILLMAN H. LIBBY, real estate 
and insurance agent of Union 
Scjuare, Somerville, was born in 
Limington, Me., on April 3, 1826, 
son of John A. and Abigail (Sawyer) Libby. 
The Libbys have always been a strong and 
hardy race. There are many of the name now 
resident in Portland and in other parts of the 
State of Maine, descendants of one John 
Libby, Englishman, who was born about 1602, 
and came to America in 1630. John Libby 
settled at Scarboro, Me., and was in the em- 
ploy of Trelawney, who was engaged in the 
fisheries business. He became owner of a 
long neck of land a few miles west of Rich- 
mond Island, between the Nonesuch and Libby 
Rivers. During King Philip's War he lost 
everything he had except his plantation; and 



on July 10, 1677, he appeared in Boston with 
his wife, and petitioned the Governor and 
Council to discharge from Black Point garri- 
son his two sons, Henry and Anthony, upon 
whom he was dependent for support. 

Captain John Libby, son of Henry and 
great-grandfather of Stillman H., was born in 
Lynn about the year 1700, but spent most of 
his life in Scarboro. He was a man of 
marked ability, and held many offices of pub- 
lic trust. By occupation he was a land sur- 
veyor. In 174s he was a Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain George Berry's company, and after the 
death of Captain Berry was promoted to oc- 
cupy his position. Captain Libby's son 
Stephen was born in Scarboro in 1743. He 
married, and had a large family of children. 
His home was at Oak Hill on the road from 
Portland to Gorham, Me. 

His son, John A., father of Mr. Libby, of 
Somerville, was one of triplets, born at Scar- 
boro in 1792. When fifteen years of age he 
shipped as cabin boy on the "Three Brothers," 
his older brothers, Moses and Stephen, being 
also in the crew. The vessel sailed from 
Portland; and upon reaching New York he re- 
ceived and accepted an invitation to go up the 
Hudson River on the "Clermont," which was 
the first steamboat made and put to practical 
use for conveying passengers and freight in 
this country, that being her famous trial trip. 
Later in life John A. Libby carried on a 
farm, and also worked at blacksmithing. He 
was somewhat active in town affairs, and was 
Superintendent of Roads in Limington. His 
last days were spent in Somerville, Mass., 
where he died at the age of eighty-two years. 
His wife, Abigail, was the daughter of Eben- 
ezer Sawyer, of Limington, Me. The Saw- 
yers were among the early settlers of Maine, 
and Ebenezer was one of the American 
soldiers that fought at Bunker Hill. John A. 
and Abigail Libby were the parents of ten 
children, namely: George W. ; John A.; 
Franklin F. ; Marshal and Michael, twins; 
Ansel; Moses, who died in infancy; Stillman 
H. ; Moses M. ; and Abbie M. 

Stillman H. Libby spent his boyhood until 
he was fifteen years of age at Limington, 
where he attended the public schools and 
worked on his father's farm. Coming to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Massachusetts in 1841, he secured employ- 
ment in a dry-goods store in Boston; and 
when twenty years of age he started a dry- 
goods store in Hanover Street, which he man- 
aged for twenty-eight years. For five years 
he also had a store in Tremont Street. Sell^ 
ing out in Boston, he came to Sonierville, and 
opened his present line of business. 

Mr. Libby has identified himself with 
Somerville affairs, and has taken a warm in- 
terest in. all matters of public concern. In 
1876 and 1877 he sat in the Common Council 
and was president of that body; in 1878 and 
1879 he was a member of the Board of Alder- 
men; and from 1880 to 1889 he was one of 
the principal Assessors of the city, for six 
years of that period being chairman of the 
board. He is a member of several fraternal 
societies. He was first Grand Regent of the 
Royal Arcanum, and served in that capacity 
for three years, for eight years he was on the 
Supreme Council and on the Finance Com- 
mittee, and for four years was chairman of the 
committee. He is also a member of the 
Home Circle and of the Knights of Honor. 

Mr. Libby and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Catherine B. W. Wyeth, have had 
three children. Their two daughters, Emma 
and Amabell, died in childhood. Elmer R., 
the son, is a trusted employee in the Somer- 
ville National Bank. Mrs. Libby is Regent 
of the local chapter of Daughters of the Revo- 
lution, her grandfather having fought in the 
patriot ranks at Bunker Hill. 



RSKINE WARDEN, the fifth Mayor of 
the city of Waltham, was born in Bar- 
net, Caledonia County, Vt., in 1839, 
son of Captain William and Abigail (Wal- 
lace) Warden. He completed his education in 
the academy at Mclndoe's Falls, and for some 
time was engaged in teaching school in Bar- 
net. In 1866 he went to Boston, and for 
about a year was connected with the Perkins 
Institution for the Blind. In the autumn of 
1867 he came to Waltham, where he engaged 
in the grocery business, and in 1868 he be- 
came associated with his present partner, 
William A. Northrop. His business ability 
and integrity became recognized by all with 



whom he had dealings, and his fellow-citizens 
were quick to discern in him a man worthy 
of their confidence. 

As a firm supporter of the Republican 
party he was elected to represent Waltham in 
the legislature in 1884, and he was subse- 
quently three times re-elected. During his 
four years' service he displayed a conscien- 
tious attention to duty, and his firm support 
of those measures which he considered judi- 
cious was frequently the means of influencing 
his colleagues. He served upon the Commit- 
tees on Public Charitable Institutions, Liquor 
License, and others, and was chairman of the 
first-named committee for some time. He 
was mainly instrumental in securing the pas- 
sage of the bill appropriating two hundred 
thousand dollars for the establishment of the 
Massachusetts School for Feebled-minded 
Children at Waltham, and it is generally be- 
lieved that he accepted a fourth nomination to 
the House solely for that purpose. He is on 
record as an enthusiastic supporter of the 
Weekly Payment Bill and for opposing the 
Salary Grab Bill. The State Auditor's re- 
port for 1887 shows that he at once returned 
to the treasury the one hundred dollars' addi- 
tional salary which was paid him in spite of 
his adverse vote. 

Mr. Warden was elected the fifth Mayor of 
Waltham, and served during the years 1893 
and 1894. A change that was made in the 
city charter under, his administration required 
him to make ninety-five appointments, all of 
which were accepted by the City Council. 
His efforts in behalf of the city were marked 
by the same earnest endeavor to uphold the 
principles of honor and justice which charac- 
terize his work in the legislature. Always 
considerate of the opinion of others, he weighs 
carefully the arguments against a measure as 
well as his reasons for supporting it, and his 
standing as a citizen is clearly shown by the 
positions of trust he has been called upon to 
fill. He is a director of the Waltham Na- 
tional Bank, a trustee of the Waltham Savings 
Bank, a trustee of the Massachusetts School 
for Feeble-minded, a trustee of the Waltham 
Hospital, and treasurer of the Leland Home 
for Aged Women. He attends to a great deal 
of probate business, and is frequently selected 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to care for the property of the insane. He 
is a member of Monitor Lodge, F. & A. M., 
and of the Mayors' Club, but is not what may 
be called a club man. 

In 1873 Mr. Warden was united in mar- 
riage with Elizabeth Craigie Webb, of New 
Bedford, Mass. She was a daughter of Hiram 
and Harriet Ann (Whippey) Webb, and 
grand-daughter of the Rev. Daniel Webb, a 
noted Methodist preacher of his day. Her 
father was a California pioneer during the 
gold fever days, and was later a prominent 
business man and public official of New Bed- 
ford. Mrs. Warden died in June, 1894, leav- 
ing an adopted daughter, Helen, who is now 
the wife of Charles Dennault, a photographer 
in Fall River, Mass. 

Mr. Warden has had a business career of 
over a quarter of a century, during which 
time he has gone in and out among his fellow- 
citizens, displaying a readiness to aid by any 
means in his power the rich or poor, native or 
foreign, no matter of what political belief or 
religious faith. Unostentatious in his acts 
of charity and helpfulness, he had in his wife 
during their twenty years and moi'e of close 
companionship a ready and sympathetic coad- 
jutor. Mr. Warden is a member of the Con- 
gregational church. 



"ON. LEANDER MOODY HAN- 
NUM, of Cambridge, who has long 
been before the public eye in differ- 
ent positions of trust, was born in 
Northampton, Mass., December 22, 1837, son 
of Alexander C. and Laura A. (Moody) Han- 
num and descendant of a long line of ener- 
getic and successful business men. His 
grandfather, Paul Hannum, and his father, 
Alexander C. Hannum, were both born in 
Easthampton, Mass. The latter married a 
daughter of Ezra Moody, of New Salem, 
Mass., and had three children, all of whom 
are now living, one being a daughter, Esther 
F. The father died at the age of sixty-three 
years. 

Leander Moody Hannum was the eldest- 
born child. He was educated in the North- 
ampton schools, at Crilliston Seminary, and at 
the English and Classical Institution at 



Springfield. When but sixteen years of age 
he went to California, where he remained two 
years; and then returning he entered the em- 
ploy of Bemis West & Co., of Springfield, 
wholesale grocers. Two years later he tried 
his fortunes in New York City, accepting a 
position with the Howe Sewing Machine 
Company as their cashier and correspondent. 
He removed to Cambridge in 1864, opened a 
grocery store on old Main Street, and contin- 
ued in this line of business for several years, 
gradually, however, turning his attention to 
real estate, until for the past twenty years he 
has devoted himself to the real estate business 
exclusively. He has been a member of the 
corporation of Cambridgeport Savings Bank 
for several years. 

Mr. Hannum is a Republican, and began his 
political career in 1873 as a member of the 
Common Council. The following year he was 
Alderman, being re-elected in 1875. The 
next two years he represented Cambridge in 
the lower branch of the State legislature, and 
while there served as chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings and of the Com- 
mittee on Street Railways. In 1881-82 he 
was State Senator, and was chairman of the 
Committee on Prisons, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on the State House, and one of a 
Committee on Insurance. For seven years he 
held the chair of the Republican City Com- 
mittee in Cambridge; and he served ten years 
on the Board of Water Commissioners, resign- 
ing in 1894. Mr. Hannum was also a special 
commissioner for Middlesex County for sev- 
eral years. 

He is a member and Past Master of Ami- 
cable Lodge, F. & A. M., of Cambridge; a 
member of the Cambridge Royal Arch Chapter 
and of the Boston Commandery, K. T. ; and 
has served two terms as District Deputy 
G. M. of this district. He is also connected 
with the best social clubs of the city, includ- 
ing the Colonial and Cambridge Clubs; is a 
member of the Trade Association and of the 
various posts and military organizations. A 
member of the Third Congregational Church, 
he has served on the Parish Committee for 
several years. He is also auditor and a 
member of the Advisory Board of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On December 15, 1869, he married Annie 
H. Demain, daugliter of William C. Demain. 
Two children were born of this union. Both 
have passed from earth. 



§OHN NATHANIEL BARBOUR, for- 
merly a well-known and highly es- 
teemed resident of Cambridgeport, was 
born in Boston, October 4, 1805, son 
of John and Hepsibah (Sullivan) Barber. 
His father, who was a merchant tailor, having 
a shop on Prince Street, near Salem Street, 
died when the subject of this sketch was ten 
years old. The latter was educated in the 
schools at the North End. At the age of eigh- 
teen he entered the store of William Lovering, 
Jr., a dealer in oils and ship supplies on State 
Street, with whom he remained about five 
years. In 1828, at the age of twenty-three, 
he engaged with his cousin in the wholesale 
grocery business, under the name of Sullivan 
& Barbour, at the corner of Commercial and 
what is now known as Cross Street, Boston. 
At this early day he was an ardent temper- 
ance man, and, although liquors were very 
generally used at that time, and formed one of 
the" staple articles of the grocery trade, yet he 
declined to sell or keep in stock any kind of 
intoxicant; and these principles he firmly ad- 
hered to through life. Some years after es- 
tablishing the grocery business mentioned 
above, he was financially backing and at times 
conducting with others the first temperance 
paper in Boston. At a later period his active 
efforts to suppress the liquor saloons in Cam- 
bridge, where he had made his home, so in- 
censed the rumsellers that they threatened to 
take his life and burn his house. In ante- 
bellum days he was for some time engaged in 
the shipping trade, his vessels sailing to the 
Mediterranean and to West Indi-a ports. The 
old ship "Robin Hood," commanded by Cap- 
tain Francis D. Hardy, of Cambridge, and 
sailing to the Sandwich Islands, was owned 
by him. In these years he was a prominent 
peace advocate and anti-slavery man, and his 
friendship with the poet, John G. Whittier, 
and with Wendell Phillips was very warm, 
and lasted through life. Many a night was 
his house the refuge of some fugitive slave on 



his way to Canada and freedom. Once he, 
with Judge Russell (afterward the collector of 
the port of Boston) and Wendell Phillips, 
chartered a tug, went down the harbor at 
night, took two slaves off a vessel from the 
South, and forwarded them to Canada, while 
the owners were waiting on the wharf in Bos- 
ton the arrival of the vessel to take them and 
carry them back to slavery. His sympathy 
and earnest work in this direction won the 
friendship of Charles Sumner and Henry Wil- 
son, which he improved on his several visits 
to Washington; and when tiie Internal Rev- 
enue Department was established they advo- 
cated Mr. Barbour's appointment as a man of 
business ability, honesty, and integrity. He 
was consequently appointed successively to 
various offices in the revenue service, until 
finally he was advanced to the position of 
Supervisor for the District of Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, and Connecticut, which he held 
until 1869. 

Mr. Barbour was an active member of the 
Baptist church, serving as superintendent of 
the Sabbath-school of the First Baptist 
Church of Boston, when situated at the corner 
of Hanover and Union Streets, and for over 
fifty years at the First Baptist Church of Cam- 
bridge, where he taught a Bible class for 
many years. He was a man of strong consti- 
tution, often working long into the night, but 
his strictly temperate habits kept him well, 
so that, until within a short time before his 
death, which occurred January 29, 1890, at 
eighty-four years of age, he never had an at- 
tack of sickness severe enough to confine him 
for one day to his bed. His was an active 
life for good, and many were the kindly acts 
of charity, performed . unnoticed save by his 
family and his beneficiaries. His strong, im- 
pulsive nature made him at times radical in 
the measures he advocated, but his zeal was 
inspired by an honest purpose to do right and 
uphold the principles in which he believed. 

In 1830 Mr. Barbour was married to a most 
estimable Christian woman. Miss Susan Sar- 
gent, whose home was on Prince Street, Bos- 
ton, and who was a daughter of Loring and 
Margaret (Abrams) Sargent. For a while 
Mr. and Mrs. Barbour lived on Friend Street. 
Then they removed to Cambridgeport on 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Franklin, near Magazine Street, where they 
resided in the same house for nearly sixty 
years. Here were born three sons and two 
daughters, namely: William S., the eldest, 
who was for many years (and until his death) 
the city engineer of Cambridge; Alfred L., 
the second-born, who for nearly twenty-five 
years has been the secretary and manager of 
the Cambridge Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany; John Edwin, a younger son, who was 
in the employ of the Hon. Robert O. Fuller, 
the iron merchant, but who died at the age of 
thirty-one; Susan, the elder daughter, who 
married the Rev. W. H. Evans, a Baptist 
clergyman ; and Emma, who became the wife 
of William H. Whitney, a prominent civil 
engineer of Boston, residing in Cambridge. 



LLEN D. FRENCH, real estate dealer 
of Waltham, Mass., formerly in the 
plumbing business, is a native of 
Lincolnville, Me., where his grand- 
father, Hezekiah French, settled more than a 
hundred years ago, and where his parents, 
Abel and Jane (Drinkwater) French, made 
their home. Earlier ancestors of Mr. French 
lived in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 
William French, the founder of the family in 
America, was born March 13, 1603, in Hal- 
stead, Essex County, England, came over in 
1635 with his wife, Eliza, in the ship "Defi- 
ance," and settled first at Cambridge, Mass. 
He removed to Billerica, Mass., about the 
year 1652, and was its first Deputy in the 
Colonial Assembly, one of its first Selectmen, 
and a man of prominence in all its earliest 
history. He died November 20, 1681. His 
children were: Francis, Elizabeth, Mary, 
John, Sarah, Jacob, Hannah, Hannah (sec- 
ond), Samuel, Mary, Sarah, Abigail, Hannah 
(third). 

Jacob French, the third son, was born in 
Cambridge, March 16, 1640, removed with 
his father to Billerica in 1652, and died May 
20, 1713. He was four times married, and 
his eleven children were as follows: Jacob, 
Deacon William, Mary, John, Joseph, Jabez, 
Mary (second), Hannah, Elizabeth, Sarah, 
and Abigail. Deacon William, the second 
son of Jacob, was born at Billerica, July iS, 



1668, and married Mary Danforth, May 22, 
1695. Their children were: Jacob, Joseph, 
Sarah, William, Jonathan, Elizabeth, Eben- 
ezer, Mary, Nicholas, Lydia, Esther, and 
Samuel. Ebenezer French, the seventh of 
this group, born at Billerica, August 5, 1707, 
married Elizabeth Hill, August 27, 1729, and 
died December 31, 1791. He was the father 
of Elizabeth Sarah, Lucy, Ebenezer, Esther, 
Jesse, Jacob, Abigail, and Samuel. Eben- 
ezer, Jr., his eldest son, was born at Biller- 
ica, May 2, 1735, married June 3, 1760, Re- 
becca Kidder, and had Ebenezer, Rebecca, 
Sarah, Abel, Lydia, Zadock, Elizabeth, Hez- 
ekiah, Francis, Josiah. 

Hezekiah French, fourth son of Ebenezer, 
Jr., was born at Billerica, January 18, 1773, 
in the old French house that is still standing, 
removed to what was then called the Planta- 
tion of Ducktrap and Canaan about 1796, be- 
fore it was incorporated into the town of Lin- 
colnville, and was chosen Treasurer at its first 
town meeting, September 20, 1802. The sec- 
ond town meeting was held at his house, Oc- 
tober 7, 1802. He settled at the place called 
French's Beach, which took its name from 
him. Hezekiah French was a well-educated 
man. He was a ship-carpenter and a large 
land-owner. He married Eunice Rogers in 
1797, and they became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Lydia, born January 17, 
1800; Ebenezer, who was born July 16, 1801, 
and died September 2, 1874; Eliza, born 
April 9, 1803, died November 13, 181 7; 
Hezekiah, born January 3, 1805, died Novem- 
ber 14, 1854; Francis H., born September 8, 
1806, died June 24, 1839; Abel, born April 
23, 1808, died April 22, 1889; Philander, 
born April 27, 18 10, died July 5, 1876; 
Beulah, born January 14, 1813; Eunice, born 
May 4, 1814, died January 14, 1816; and 
Zadock J. H., born October 2, 1817. Heze- 
kiah French died at Lincolnville, Me., May 
14, 1843. 

Abel French, the fourth son of Hezekiah, 
was a blacksmith, but understood also his 
father's trade, and in 1845 built a vessel 
called the "Martha Washington." He was 
married three times. His first wife was Jane 
Drinkwater, who was born December 24, 
1810, married July 10, 1832, and died Febru- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ary 24, 1844. By her he had: Oscar Wyman, 
born December 21, 1834; Louisa, born No- 
vember 18, 1836; Charles, born September 
22, 1838; Allen Drinkwater, born August 16, 
1840; and Evander Le Roy, born August 24, 
1842. By his second wife, Eliza A. Phipps, 
who was born May 27, 1815, and died October 
29, 1850, he had one child, Edward, born 
April 27, 1847, who died September 18, 1850. 
He married third, May 30, 1852, Lucy A. 
Pendleton, born December 29, 1821. 

Allen D. French, third son of Abel and 
Jane, was educated in the common schools of 
Lincolnville, Me. At the age of nineteen 
years he went to Belfast, Me., where he 
learned the plumber's trade. He had served 
two years of his apprenticeship when the war 
broke out; and he enlisted in October, 1861, 
in Company E, First Maine Cavalry, and was 
with General Banks in the Shenandoah Valley. 
He was taken prisoner May 24, 1862, at the 
battle of Middletown, in company with his 
younger brother, Evander L. They were sent 
to Winchester, and were imprisoned for two 
months at Lynchburg and for another two 
months at Belle Isle, where they were then 
paroled. After the war he spent six months 
in Belfast, whence he went to Portland for 
one season; and on returning to Belfast he 
started a stove and tinware business in part- 
nership with Samuel A. Moulton. At the 
end of the year the partnership was dissolved, 
and Mr. French continued the business alone 
for sixteen years. He sold his interests at 
the end of that time, and, going to Colorado, 
engaged in mining and in the plumbing busi- 
ness for three years. Settling in Waltham in 
1883, for the next eleven years he devoted 
himself to the plumbing business, and since 
that time has turned his attention entirely to 
real estate. 

Formerly a Republican, he is now an Inde- 
pendent in politics. He was in the Belfast 
Common Council two years and Alderman for 
one year, but refused nomination the second 
time. He helped to organize Company H of 
the First Regiment of Maine Infantry, and 
was Orderly Sergeant until commissioned 
Second Lieutenant by Governor Perum. He 
resigned April 25, 1874. He joined the 
E. V. Sumner Post, G. A. R., at Silver 



Cliff, Col., and was afterward transferred to 
F. P. H. Rogers Post, No. 29, G. A. R., of 
Waltham. He joined the Timothy Chase 
Lodge, No. 126, F. & A. M., of Belfast, in 
1866, and held office continuously for seven 
years, reaching the position of Master of the 
lodge. He was also a member of the Corin- 
thian Royal Arch Chapter and of King Solo- 
mon Council, No. i. Royal and Select Mas- 
ters, both of Belfast. At Rockland, Me., in 
1874 he joined the Claremont Commandery, 
K. T. He was demitted to the Isaac Parker 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Waltham, and to the 
Gethsemane Commandery at Newtonville. 
He is a member of the A. O. U. Workmen. 
Mr. French attends the Congregational 
Church of Waltham. 

He married Mary Elizabeth Yates in Lin- 
colnville, Me., November 14, 1863, and has 
had five children, four of whom are now living: 
Clarence Freeman, born August 20, 1864, is a 
graduate of Tufts College and Harvard Law 
School, and is now in practice in Waltham ; 
Herbert Allen, born May 8, 1866, is con- 
nected with the Worcester E%iening Telegram 
at Worcester; Erminie Angelia, born Febru- 
ary g, 1868, was graduated at the Bridgewater 
Normal School, and is now teaching at Whit- 
ingsville; Oscar LeRoy, born May 8, 1871, 
died July 11, 1872; Allen Evander, born 
March 12, 1873, graduated from Tufts Col- 
lege, and is now in the engineering depart- 
ment of the West End Railroad. 






lARCUS M. RAYMOND, a retired 
Ik dealer and present member of 
le Common Council of the city 
of Somerville, was born in Box- 
boro, Mass., in the same county, Middlesex, 
on February i, 1841, son of Nathan and Han- 
nah (Hapgood) Raymond. Nathan Raymond, 
who is supposed to have been born in Lexing- 
ton, spent most of his life in Boxboro, where 
he attended school during his boyhood. His 
occupation was farming. He was twice mar- 
ried. His children by his first wife were: 
Erie, Liberty, Ann, and William. His sec- 
ond wife, Hannah, was the daughter of 
Ephraim Hapgood, of Acton, and was the 
mother of four children, namely: Harriet and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William, who are now deceased; Ephraim and 
Marcus M., the special subject of this sketch. 

Marcus M. Raymond lived at Princeton, 
Mass., until fifteen years of age, and subse- 
quently removed to Boxboro.. When about 
nineteen years old he went to Lowell, and 
there learned the machinist's trade, which he 
followed for six years. • In 1867 he settled in 
Charlestown, and went into the milk business, 
in which he became extensively engaged, and 
met with merited success. In 1873 he bought 
his present residence, which is at 37 Jaques 
Street, Somerville, formerly a part of C.harles- 
town. Mr. Raymond has taken a lively inter- 
est in the affairs of Somerville ever since he 
became a resident of this city. In 1895 he 
was elected on the Republican ticket to repre- 
sent Ward Three in the Common Council. 
Carrying into the public service the same 
upright and prompt methods that had charac- 
terized his personal business career, at the 
end of his first term he was re-elected, and is 
now serving his second term. 

Mr. Raymond is a member of the Knights 
of Honor. He has been twice married. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Martha M. 
Sawin, bore him three children, two of whom 
are living, namely: Carrie, wife of Alonzo 
Cushing; and Ella L. A daughter, Nellie, 
died in infancy. The present Mrs. Raymond 
was before her marriage Alice V. Weatherbe. 
She is the mother of one son, John M. Ray- 
mond. 






[LLIAM WILBERFORCE DAL- 
LINGER, Treasurer of the city of 
Cambridge, was born in this city, 
September 27, 1840, son of John and Martha 
(Burrage) Dallinger. His paternal ancestors 
were German. The original ancestor of the 
Burrage family in this country emigrated from 
England in 1636, and settled in Lynn, Mass. 

John Dallinger, grandfather of William W., 
arrived in America in 1820, settling in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. He was a hatter by trade, and 
carried on business in Cambridge for some 
years. He was a well-known citizen and an 
earnest advocate of the cause of abolition. 

John Dallinger, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in London, and came to the 



United States with his parents when a boy. 
His wife died at the age of twenty-seven 
years, William W. being the only child of 
their union. 

William Wilberforce Dallinger was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Cambridge. 
After graduating from the high school, he 
entered the employ of Emerson, Cochrane & 
Co., wholesale boot and shoe dealers on Pearl 
Street, Boston. He rose to the position of 
confidential clerk, and remained with them 
and their successors up to the disastrous fire 
in the business district of the city in 1872. 
In January, 1878, he became City Treasurer 
of Cambridge, and is now serving his twenty- • 
first year in that office. He has witnessed 
many changes in his department, made neces- 
sary by the city's growth. The income has 
doubled since he took charge of the public 
finances, making it necessary to increase the 
force of clerks from one to six; and all moneys 
paid into and out of the city treasury must 
pass through the Treasurer's hands. Mr. 
Dallinger is a member of the Cambridge and 
Middlesex Clubs. He is vice-president of the 
City Treasurers' Association of Massachu- 
setts, is a trustee and was formerly on the 
Board of Managers of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, and is connected with other 
organizations. 

In 1868 he married Elizabeth F. Kingman, 
daughter of Pliny E. Kingman, of Chicago. 
He has three children living — Frederick W., 
Philip B., and Ruth. For thirty years Mr. 
Dallinger has been Warden of St. Peter's 
Episcopal Church, which he has attended 
since early childhood. His paternal grand- 
father was one of the organizers of that parish. 



GRACE CARR WHITE, M.D., of 

Somerville, one of the leading phy- 
sicians of Middlesex County, was 
born in Bowdoin, Me., on January 
26, 1836, son of Gideon and Rhoda (Springer) 
White. His great-grandfather White, who is 
said to have been a descendant of the family 
to which belonged Peregrine White, the first 
child born of Pilgrim parentage in New FAig- 
land, went from Essex, Mass., to Bath, Me., 
one of the earliest settlers there. The house 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which he built of hewed timber and furnished 
with port-holes in order to guard against at- 
tacks of Indians was standing in Bath until 
about twenty-five years ago, when it was torn 
down. Dr. White has many times seen it. 
Isaac White, grandfather of the Doctor, was 
born in Bath, but subsequently removed to 
Topsham, where he died at the age of eighty- 
three. He was a prominent man in the Bap- 
tist church, a Deacon, and was one of the first 
to come out of the old "hard-shell" faction. 
His wife, Martha Owen, who was a native of 
Topsham, and was one of a family of ten chil- 
dren, died at an advanced age. 

Gideon White, son of Isaac and Martha, 
was reared to farm life. His early years were 
spent in Bowdoin, Me. He removed to Litch- 
field in 1836, and while away from home, 
working in Augusta in the fall of that year, 
he died, his son Horace being then nine 
months old. Gideon White served a short 
time in the War of 181 2. His wife, Rhoda, 
who was born in Litchfield, was one of eight 
children of David Springer, a native and a 
lifelong resident of Litchfield, Me. She be- 
came the mother of seven children, of whom 
two are living. She died at forty-nine years 
of age. Both Mrs. White and her husband 
were members of the Baptist church. 

Horace Carr White, being compelled to give 
up studying when about seventeen years of 
age, on account of trouble with his eyes, went 
into business, and was for three years in com- 
mercial pursuits at Gardiner, Me., and in 
Boston. While in the last-named city, he de- 
voted his leisure to attendance upon the 
Lowell Institute courses and other lectures, 
thus supplementing the knowledge acquired in 
his earlier training. He fitted for college at 
the Litchfield Liberal Institute, pursued his 
professional studies at the medical department 
of Bowdoin College, and was graduated there 
in 1859. From 1855, when he returned to 
school, until i860, when he settled in Lisbon 
Falls, Me., as a physician, he was engaged 
for about a third of the time in teaching. 

At the breaking out of the Rebellion he en- 
tered the Union army as assistant surgeon of 
the Eighth Maine Regiment, and, after two 
years of severe and exacting service, returned 
to Lisbon broken down in health. This was 



in July, 1863. He remained in Lisbon Falls 
until 1S74, when 'he came to Somerville, 
where he has since been engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession, and has achieved a wide 
reputation for skill. 

Dr. White has always been deeply inter- 
ested in educational matters. While at Lis- 
bon he was Supervisor of Schools for four 
years, and since coming to Somerville he has 
been on the School Board for about twelve 
years. Harpswell Academy was organized by 
him, and he took a leading part in securing 
the erection of the building. He has also 
shown a warm interest in all matters of public 
importance and in the administrative affairs 
of the town or city of which he has been a 
resident. While in Lisbon he served as Se- 
lectman, Overseer of the Poor, and Assessor 
for three years, and as Postmaster of the town 
from 1869 to 1874. 

He has been a trustee of the Somerville 
Hospital since its organization and a member 
of the Medical Board and of the Medical and 
Surgical Staff. He is a member and ex-presi- 
dent of the Boston Gynjecological and of the 
Somerville Medical Societies. He is a fellow 
of the Massachusetts Medical Association, 
member of the Maine Medical Association, 
also of the American Medical Association, 
and was a member of the Ninth International 
Congress. Fraternally, he belongs to Soley 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; De Molay Commandery, 
Knights Templars; and to Orient Council. 
He was first admitted to the Masonic body in 
United Lodge of Brunswick, Me., and was 
one of the founders of Ancient York Lodge of 
Lisbon Falls and one of its first Masters. In 
1879 he assisted in founding Soley Lodge. 
He is connected with the Loyal Legion,' 
G. A. R., is ex-president of Sons of Maine of 
Somerville, and president of the Mystic 
Valley Club and a member of other clubs. 
In politics the Doctor is a stanch Republican. 
He was elected Representative to the General 
Court on the Republican ticket in i8g6, was 
re-elected in 1897, and is serving during the 
present session, 1898. 

On June 4, i860, Dr. White was united in 
marriage with Mary Lithgow, daughter of 
Captain Paul and Nancy Randall, of Harps- 
well, Me. Mr. Randall was a very prominent 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



citizen of Harpswell, where he died at the age 
of seventy-five years. His children numbered 
three. Dr. and Mrs. White have the foliow- 
ing-named children — Lucy Frances, Bessie 
Randall, and William Horace White. Lucy 
Frances White is secretary of the Associated 
Charities of Somerville. Bessie Randall, a 
graduate of Colby University, is a teacher 
in the Brooklyn (N.Y.) High School. Dr. 
White and bis family belong to the Baptist 
church. 



§-ACOB M. ELLIS, a well-known con- 
tractor of Woburn, Mass., was born 
in Canton, Me., November i, 1834, 
son of Martin and Desire (Russell) 
Ellis. He is a descendant of Peres Ellis,' 
whose son, Peres,' was grandfather of Jacob 
M. Martin Ellis, father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Hartford, Me., and 
subsequently became a resident of Canton, 
that State, where he followed farming. He 
was a Universalist minister, and in politics a 
Whig. He died in 1866, aged seventy-eight 
years. His wife, Desire, who was a native of 
Yarmouth, Me., died in 1876, at the age of 
eighty-six. 

Jacob M. Ellis was reared to manhood in 
his native town of Canton, and received his 
education in the public schools of that place. 
He then learned the trade of stone-mason, and 
has since been chiefly engaged in that busi- 
ness as contractor in Melrose, Maiden, Con- 
cord, and Woburn. For several years he has 
been engaged in bridge building as well as 
local work, the former chiefly for the Boston 
& Maine Railroad. Among the larger con- 
tracts which he has executed for them were 
the stone stations at Prospect Hill, Winter 
Hill, and Somerville Highlands, and bridge 
work at Norwich and Walden, Vt., and 
Lowell, Somerville, Medford, and Winches- 
ter, Mass., and the viaduct at Chelsea. His 
contracts with the road have included work 
over almost all the system. Some years ago 
he formed a partnership with John W. Bus- 
well, of Salisbury, Mass., since which time 
they have conducted business together under 
the firm name of Ellis & Buswell. 

Soon after the beginning of the Civil War, 



Mr. Ellis enlisted as a private in Company 
B, Captain O. F. Nims, Second Battery, Mas- 
sachusetts Light Artillery. He was enrolled 
on July 31, 1S61, and discharged in August, 
1865. He was commissioned January 8, 
1865, as Second Lieutenant in the same com- 
pany. Mr. Ellis is a Gold Democrat in poli- 
tics, and he has served his fellow-townsmen 
as Alderman, Overseer of the I^oor, and Li- 
cense Commissioner. He attends and helps 
to support the Unitarian church. He is a 
Mason, belonging to Mount Horeb Lodge, 
Woburn Royal Arch Chapter, Hugh de 
Payens Commandery, the Massachusetts Con- 
sistory, F. & A. M., and Aleppo Temple, 
Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to Crystal 
Fount Lodge and Woburn Encampment, 
I. O. O. F., and to Post No. 33, G. A. R., 
and the G. A. R. Club. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Young Men's Democratic Clubs. 

Mr. Ellis was married in June, 1854, to 
Betsey Packard, of Buckfield, Me. a daughter 
of Moses Packard. She died in 1S61. On 
August 26, 1865, Mr. Ellis married for his 
second wife Margaret Clinton, of New Or- 
leans, La., a daughter of William and Cath- 
erine Clinton. I-ie has five children — Edgar 
S., Willie B., Arthur C, Maude A., and 
Ernest M. — the first two of whom were by 
his first wife. 



(5>r-LEXANDER McKENZIE, D.D., of 
ijA Cambridge, a preacher, lecturer, and 
yJjA writer of national reputation, was 
born in New Bedford, Mass., De- 
cember 14, 1830. He is a son of Daniel and 
I-'hoebe (Smith) McKenzie, and is descended 
from the Spragues and Mayhews of early Colo- 
nial times. The Spragues settled in Charles- 
town early in the history of this country. 
Daniel McKenzie was a sea captain, and many 
of the Doctor's kinsmen have been sailors. 

Alexander McKenzie in his youth attended 
the public schools of New Bedford, and fitted 
for college at Phillips Academy, Andover. 
Before entering Harvard he worked for a short 
time as clerk in a store in New Bedford, and 
later on. he was four years with Lawrence, 
Stone & Co., manufacturers and commission 
merchants. Milk Street, Boston. He was 




JACOB M. ELLIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



graduated at Harvard in 1859, entered the 
Andover Theological Seminary the same year, 
and was there graduated in 1861. He was 
ordained in Augusta, Me., August 28, 1861, 
and at the same time installed as pastor of the 
South Church. Leaving Augusta to respond 
to a call from the First Church of Cambridge, 
Mass., he entered on the duties of his present 
pastorate, January 24, 1867. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Amherst 
College in 1879. 

Dr. McKenzie was lecturer at Andover 
Theological Seminary in 1 88 1-82, at Harvard 
Divinity School in 1882, preacher to Harvard 
College in 1886-89 (o'^s of the first preachers 
of the board), and was lecturer on New Testa- 
ment theology and lecturer on pastoral the- 
ology at Andover. He gave the oration when 
the soldiers' monument was dedicated in Cam- 
bridge in 1870, and made an address at the 
fiftieth anniversary of the city charter in 
1896. He was appointed a trustee of Bovvdoin 
in 1866-68; overseer of Harvard in 1872-84; 
secretary of the overseers of Harvard in 1875 ; 
a trustee of Phillips Academy, Andover, in 
1876; trustee of Hampton Institute, Hamp- 
ton, Va., 1885; trustee of Wellesley College 
in 1883; and he is now president of the trus- 
tees of Wellesley. He was on the Cambridge 
School Committee from 1868 to 1874, and was 
elected a trustee of the Cambridge Hospital 
in 1876. He is a member of the Colonial 
Club; was elected president of the Congrega- 
tional Club, Boston, in 1880, and president of 
the Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society in 
1886; and he is a member of the Ministers' 
Club. 

Among his published works are: "History 
of the First Church in Cambridge"; "Cam- 
bridge Sermons"; and "Some Things 
Abroad" — -in book form; "Addresses at the 
Dedication of the Soldiers' Monument in 
Cambridge" (1870) ; "Oration at the Centen- 
nial of Phillips Academy" (1878); "Sermon 
before the Legislature of Massachusetts " 
(1879); "Oration at the Commencement at 
Smith's College" (1881); "Sermon at the 
Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
First Church in Charlestown " (1882); "Ser- 
mon at the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of Cambridge" (1886); Sermon at 



the Twentieth Anniversary of his Installa- 
tion (1887); and "Sermon in Memory of 
Professor Asa Gray" (1888) — in pamphlet 
form. Dr. McKenzie wrote the Ecclesiasti- 
cal History of Middlesex County. In 1891 he 
wrote "Christ Himself" and in i8g8 "A 
Door Opened." 

He was married January 25, 1865, in Fitch- 
burg to Miss Ellen H. Eveleth, daughter of 
John Henry and Martha (Holman) Eveleth. 
Dr. and Mrs. McKenzie have two children — 
Kenneth and Margaret. Kenneth McKenzie 
was graduated at Harvard University in 189 1, 
and received the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy in 1895. In that year he travelled with 
his father through Sweden, Russia, and other 
parts of Europe, and visited Warsaw and other 
remote places of historic interest. He is now 
instructor in philology at Union College. 



ANIEL FRENCH,, the oldest lawyer 
in Waltham, Mass., was born in 
Berkley, then a part of Taunton 
township, Mass., March 16, 18 14. 
He received his education in a private school. 
Coming subsequently to Waltham, he taught 
school here from 1S42 to 1858, but on account 
of failing health he was obliged finally to re- 
sign this occupation. He has since given his 
attention to the practice of law, doing mainly 
an office business. He was clerk of the town 
of Waltham for many years, was Representa- 
tive to the legislature for one term, and is an 
incorporate member of the Leland Home for 
Aged Women at Waltham. He is also a 
member of the Congregational church and so- 
ciety, in which he has taken an active inter- 
est and has held various offices. He is also 
well known as a leader in the temperance 
movement, and is a constant attendant at the 
meetings of the various associations devoted 
to that cause. He is a warm advocate of the 
social and political rights of the colored man, 
having been an old-time abolitionist. Al- 
though advanced in years, he keeps up with 
the times, is thoroughly in sympathy with the 
various modern reform movements, and takes 
an interest in all efforts to promote the good 
of the town and the welfare of the general 
community. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(sTrUGUSTUS PECK CLARKE, M.D., 
fcliA a distinguished physician of Cam- 
yj[j,\ bridge, Mass., was born in Paw- 
^-^ tucket, R. L, September 24, 1833, 
son of Seth Darling and Fanny (Peclc) Clarke. 
He is of the ninth generation from Joseph and 
Alice (Pepper) Clarke, who emigrated from 
Suffolk County, England, where the family 
was one of great antiquity, to Dorchester, 
Mass., in 1630. 

A direct ancestor, Thomas Clarke, of Bury 
St. Edmund's, gentleman, mentioned in his 
will, dated 1506, a cross of gold which had 
been worn by one of his ancestors in the ex- 
pedition to Spain with John of Gaunt, the 
father of King Henry IV. of England, in 
1386. The line of descent from Joseph 
Clarke, above named, is through Joseph,^ Jo- 
seph, ^ Joseph, ■* Joseph, 5 Ichabod,'' Edward,' 
and Seth.'^ The Doctor's great-grandfather, 
Ichabod Clarke, was a commissioned Captain 
in the war of the Revolution; and his grand- 
father, Edward Clarke, served in the War of 
1812. Dr. Clarke's maternal grandfather, 
Joel Peck, who also served in the Revolution, 
was of the twenty-fifth generation in descent 
from "John Peck, of Belton, Yorkshire, 
knight." 

Augustus Peck Clarke completed his pre- 
paratory course in the 'University Grammar 
School, Providence, R.I., entered Brown Uni- 
versity in September, 1856, and received the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1861. Before 
completing his college course, he began the 
study of medicine under Lewis L. Miller, 
M.D., of Providence, R.I. He subsequently 
entered the Harvard Medical School, and in 
1862 there received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. In August, 1861, after an exami- 
nation before a medical board, he was ap- 
pointed assistant surgeon of the Sixth New 
York Cavalry, and at once entered upon the 
duties of the office. He was with the regi- 
ment in the Peninsular Campaign of 1862, 
was at the siege of Yorktown and at subse- 
quent engagements, including those at Mc- 
chanicsville, Gaines's Mill, and Peach Or- 
chard, in the seven days' battles. At the 
battle of Savage's Station, June 29, 1862, he 
was taken prisoner, but was permitted to con- 
tinue his professional service; and he re- 



mained with the wounded until all were ex- 
changed. On May S, 1863, he was promoted 
to the rank of surgeon of the same regiment ; 
and he served with the cavalry corps in the 
Rappahannock campaign and in the other 
operations of the Army of the Potomac during 
that year. In the following spring, at the 
opening of General Grant's campaign. Dr. 
Clarke was appointed surgeon-in-chief of the 
Second Brigade of the First Cavalry Division, 
and took an active part in the movements con- 
ducted by General Sheridan. During the 
campaign of 1864-65, as surgeon-in-chief of 
all the First Cavalry Division, he accom- 
panied General Sheridan in his great raid 
from Winchester to Petersburg, and was in 
the battle of Five P'orks and in other engage- 
ments until the surrender at Appomattox. 
Much of the time during the war he was on 
the staff of General Thomas C. Devin. On 
recommendation of his superior officers he 
received brevet appointment of Lieutenant 
Colonel and Colonel for faithful and merito- 
rious service. 

Immediately after the close of the war Dr. 
Clarke went alDroad and visited medical schools 
and hospitals in Paris, London, and other 
great European cities. Returning in 1866, 
he settled in Cambridge, Mass., where he has 
since continued the practice of his profession. 

Dr. Clarke is connected with the more im- 
portant medical societies of this country, and 
has been a delegate to numerous conventions 
in America and abroad. . Pie is a member of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society, and has 
been one of its councillors; member of the 
American Academy of Medicine; of the 
American Association of Obstetricians and 
Gynsecologists; and of the American Medical 
Association, of which last society he was vice- 
president in 1895-96, and in which he is now 
chairman of the section of physiology and 
dietetics. He was president of the Gynaeco- 
logical Society of Boston in 1891 and in 1892; 
a vice-president of the First Pan-American 
Medical Congress in 1S93; member of the 
Ninth International Medical Congress at 
Washington, D. C, in 1S87; of the tenth at 
Berlin in 1890; and of the eleventh, which 
was held at Rome, Italy, in 1894; a delegate 
in 1S90 to the British Medical Association 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and to medical societies in Paris in the same 
year; a delegate and vice-president of the 
Second Pan-American Medical Congress at 
Mexico in i8g6; and a delegate and an honor- 
ary president of the Twelfth International Med- 
ical Congress in Moscow, Russia, in 1897. 

Dr. Clarke is the author of a large number 
of valuable papers on medical subjects, which 
have been read before various societies, or 
have been published in the leading medical 
journals throughout the country, and many of 
which have been translated into foreign lan- 
guages. These papers deal largely with sub- 
jects pertaining to obstetrics and gynaecology, 
on which he is considered one of the leading 
authorities in the country. He has also 
written a number of poems, and has contrib- 
uted to the Cambridge daily papers and to 
various periodicals entertaining sketches of 
his travels abroad. Among these have been 
"A Visit to Pompeii and Vesuvius," which 
appeared in the Cambridge Chronicle in 1892; 
"A Cavalry Surgeon's Experience in the 
Battle of the Wilderness," which appeared in 
the United States Service Magazine in 1894; 
and "Closing Battles of.the Late War," 1884. 
Among his poems have been the following: 
"A Tribute to Dr. Morrill Wyman on the Oc- 
casion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of his 
Practice," Cambridge Press, 1887; "A Trib- 
ute to the Memory of Dr. John B. Taylor," 
read before the Cambridge Club- on the occa- 
sion of its annual dinner at Young's Hotel in 
1889; a poem written for the twenty-fifth an- 
niversary of the Cambridge Society for Medi- 
cal Improvement, of which Dr. Clarke was 
one of the founders and the secretary from 
1870 to 1875. He is author of the volume, 
"Clarke's Kindred Genealogies," 1896. 

Dr. Clarke married on October 23, 1861, 
Miss Mary H. Gray, author and poet, daugh- 
ter of the late Gideon and Hannah Orne (Met- 
calf) Gray, and of the seventh generation in 
descent from Edward Gray, who settled in 
Plymouth in 1643. They have two daughters: 
Inez Louise, a graduate of Radcliffe College 
in the class of 1891 ; and Genevieve, a mem- 
ber of the same institution and now a student 
of medicine. 

Dr. Clarke has been professor of gynaecology 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 



Boston since 1893, and dean of the faculty 
since 1894. He was president of the Cam- 
bridge Art Circle in 1890-91, member of the 
Cambridge City Council 1871-74, and has 
served as Alderman and as chairman of the 
Committee on Health. He is a member of 
the New England Historic-Genealogical So- 
ciety; of Cambridge Lodge, No. 13, 
I. O. O. F. ; of Amicable Lodge, F. & 
A. M.; of Cambridge Royal Arch Chapter; 
Boston Commandery, K. T. ; Boston Council, 
R. & S. M., Scottish Rites; and of Royal 
Arcanum. 

He is connected with the First Baptist 
Church of Cambridge, and was for some time 
on the Standing Committee. He is a mem- 
ber of the Brown Alumni Association and of 
Harvard Medical Association. He is a mem- 
ber of the Boston Medical Library Association 
and of the Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. Outside his profession the 
Doctor is a man of wide information, and is 
interested in all the great social questions of 
the age. He has travelled extensively. In 
1890 he was abroad with his family, and 
visited nearly all the points of interest in 
Central Europe and in the British Isles, in- 
specting the hospitals and medical schools. 
In 1897, accompanied by his family, he again 
visited Europe, journeying through Denmark, 
Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Poland, 
Germany, England, and Holland. (Mainly a 
reprint, but with some additions and omis- 
sions, from "Physicians and Surgeons of 
America.") 



"I^MORY WARREN LANE, proprietor 
pi of the Waltham Church Organ Factory, 
'^"^ " " Waltham, Mass., was born in this 
city, October 21, 1861, being the son of 
Emory William and Ellen Elizabeth (Warren) 
Lane. 

The Warren family to which his mother 
belongs is one of the oldest in Middlesex 
County, having been founded by John Warren, 
who came from England in 1630, and settled 
in Watertown, Mass. The grandfather and 
grandmother of Mr. Lane came to Waltham in 
1830, settled opposite where the organ factory 
now is, and owned the piece of land where his 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



factory stands. His great-grandfather was in 
the Revolutionary War, and his grandfather 
was in the War of 1812, and served as guard 
in a fort. 

Emory William Lane, the father named 
above, was born in Fitchburg. He was edu- 
cated in the Waltham schools and at Dart- 
mouth College, where he was graduated in 
1856; and he subsequently taught school in 
Le.Kington, Concord, and Waltham. He was 
for twenty-one years a, member of the Waltham 
School Board, and was secretary of the same. 
In 1866-67 he represented the town in the 
legislature. He was employed for eighteen 
years in the Boston custom-house, the latter 
part of his life in the clearance department. 
He died September 15, 1887. His wife still 
survives him, and lives at the old homestead. 

Emory Warren Lane is the eldest of the 
three children born to his parents and the 
only son. He was graduated at the Waltham 
High School in 1878, and then took a two 
years' course at the College of Liberal Arts 
in Boston University. In the year 1880 he 
was for a short time with the wholesale house 
of J. A. & W. Bird & Co., of Boston, and 
later on he was with Henry W. Peabody & 
Co., Australian commission merchants of the 
same city. At length he turned his attention 
to the building of church organs, being asso- 
ciated with Hook & Hastings and afterward 
with George S. Hutchings; and, becoming 
deeply interested in the business and also em- 
inently successful, he has continued in it ever 
since. He had been with the firms just men- 
tioned for ten years, and it was in 1890 that 
he commenced the organ business in Waltham. 
He began in a small way, has gradually in- 
creased his working facilities, and is now at 
the head of a thriving industry. He has built 
organs for churches all through New England, 
a few notable examples being those in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Newport, R.I. ; 
the Park Congregational Church at Worcester; 
the Church of the Sacred Heart at Woon- 
socket, R. I. ; the Congregational churches at 
West Somerville, Auburn, and Franklin, 
Mass. ; the First Baptist Church of Adams, 
Mass. ; the Baptist churches at Pittsfield, 
N.H.; and the Baptist Church of West Med- 
ford, Mass. 



The first mentioned of these deserves a word 
of descriiJtion. It occupies a recess behind 
the pulpit sixteen feet wide, sixteen feet deep, 
and about thirty feet high. It has three man- 
uals of sixty-one notes each, thirty pedals, 
forty-seven stops, twelve pedal movements, 
and two thousand, three hundred and sixteen 
pipes. The specifications are as follows: 
great organ, ten stops; swell organ, fifteen 
stops; choir organ, eight stops; pedal organ, 
four stops; and ten mechanical registers. 
The case is of quartered oak, with brown an- 
tique finish, and the decorations on the front 
pipes are of aluminum and gold, with bands 
of terra cotta. Tubular pneumatic action is 
supplied to the great, swell, and choir man- 
uals, also to the pedals; that is, instead of 
the motion from the keys or the pedals to the 
valves in the wind-chest being communicated 
by trackers (very thin strips of wood), as in 
ordinary organs, the result is brought about 
by compressed air passing through small metal 
tubes. This ensures a very light touch, 
scarcely heavier than that of a piano. Di- 
rectly behind the organ chamber in the church 
is their chapel; and here another desk is 
placed, containing one row of keys and regis- 
ters connecting with the fifteen stops of the 
swell organ, thirty pedal keys, a balanced 
swell pedal, etc., so that the organ will be 
used for their Sunday-school services as well 
as for all church services. This organ is the 
largest that has been built since the establish- 
ment of the factory here in Waltham, the next 
in size being in the Park Congregational 
Church in Worcester. The latter has been 
pronounced by the leading organists of that 
city as the finest organ of its size in 
Worcester. 

Mr. Lane possesses special aptitude for his 
chosen line of business, being something of 
an architect and designer and having consid- 
erable musical knowledge. He gives his 
whole time and attention to the business, ob- 
tains all the orders for work himself, and does 
all the designing, his natural taste and tal- 
ents enabling him to do this with comparative 
ease and with unusual success. He gives 
special supervision to the work in the factory, 
in which he employs as workmen only the 
most expert organ builders. The result is 




JOHN W. WILLIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



that he produces high-grade organs in appear- 
ance, mechanism, and general construction. 

Mr. Lane is a member of the Citizens' Club 
and of the Waltham Board of Trade, also of 
the Theta Delta Chi and the Philomathean So- 
ciety of Boston University. In politics he is 
a Republican, but is not specially active in 
that line. He attends the Congregational 
Church in Waltham. Mr. Lane is married, 
and has two children, a girl and a boy. 



§OHN WARREN WILLIS, M.D., a 
well-known practising physician of 
Waltham, Mass., was born in Belcher- 
town, Hampshire County, this State, 
in May, 1832, son of Jacob and Siley 
(F'letcher) Willis. On the paternal side, and 
probably also on the maternal side, he comes 
of old Colonial stock. Five brothers named 
Willis are known to have been early settlers in 
Eastern Massachusetts; and two of them. Dea- 
con John and Nathaniel, were among the orig- 
inal proprietors of Bridgewater, Plymouth 
County. From one of these brothers Dr. 
Willis is descended. In 1848 Jacob Willis, 
who was a native of Belchertown, removed to 
Milford, Worcester County, Mass. He had 
been a farmer in Belchertown, and also in 
business there. He was prominent in town 
affairs and a member of the Orthodox church, 
as was his wife, who was related on the ma- 
ternal side to Professor Morse, the inventor of 
the telegraph. She was a daughter of Nathan 
and Catherine (Morse) Fletcher, of Milford. 
Mrs. Siley F. Willis died at the age of eighty- 
two years, surviving her husband twenty years. 
The Doctor's parents reared three children, 
of whom he was the eldest-born. His brother 
Reuben also became a physician, and resides 
in Somerville. 

The father was anxious to give his sons a 
good education; and John Warren Willis was 
sent at an early age to a private school at 
Brookfield, taught by the Misses Merriam, 
sisters of the famous publishers of Webster's 
Unabridged Dictionary. His next instruc- 
tion was received at the Ouaboag Seminary at 
Warren; and, after removing to Milford in 
1848, he attended private schools in that 
place. When only sixteen years old he 



taught a public school in Milford, and a year 
later he taught at Mendon, Mass. During 
this time he attended the Milford High 
School, and when eighteen years of age he 
went to the Bridgewater Normal School, 
where he was graduated. He subsequently 
took a course in mathematics and engineering 
under the principal of that school, Mr. Till- 
inghast, who was a graduate of West Point. 
After teaching for a year at Bridgewater, he 
returned to Milford, and was engaged for a 
time as a land surveyor and engineer. Had 
he proved to be as good a draughtsman as he 
was a mathematician, probably he would have 
continued in this line of work. As it was, he 
returned to teaching, taking a position in the 
Stow High School and later in the Arling- 
ton High School, where he was successful in 
his vocation; but, not being satisfied with re- 
sults, he began the study of medicine with 
Dr. Francis Leland, of Milford, and entered 
the regular course of the Harvard Medical 
School, graduating in the summer of 1861. 
He served in Deer Island Hospital for several 
months, commencing practice in Waltham 
during the same year. He was commissioned 
by the government to examine recruits, and 
held the commission throughout the war. 

Dr. Willis is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, was district treasurer 
for twenty years, and has been for several 
years a councillor of the society. He is also 
a member of the Waltham Medical Society, 
which includes only members of the State so- 
ciety. He has been on the Waltham Hospital 
staff for many years, and is one of the incor- 
porators and instructors of the Waltham 
Training School for Nurses. He has written 
various articles for medical journals and so- 
cieties, among them an essay on "Tobacco 
and its Effects" and one on "Surgical Emer- 
gencies." He is prominent in town affairs, 
politically and socially. He was president 
and director of the Rumford Institute; was for 
several years upon the School Board, and was 
chairman of. that committee; was Alderman of 
the city of Waltham in 1893 and 1894, but 
refused further nomination. The Citizens' 
Club enroll his name as one of its most valued 
members, and he has served on its varied com- 
mittees. He became a Mason when teaching 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in Arlington, and has never transferred his, 
membership from Hiram Lodge of that place. 
He is also associated with the Royal Arch 
Chapter. He is an attendant of the Unita- 
rian Church of VValtham. 

He married Susan E. Rice, of Wayland, 
daughter of Calvin Rice, son of one of the 
earlier physicians of Framingham. She died 
in 1895, leaving two sons — Charles Austin 
and Dwight Fletcher — both of whom are 
graduates of Tufts College, and are now 
studying at Harvard Medical School. Dr. 
Willis has done much as an administrator of 
wills and estates, and has held power of attor- 
ney from widows and others in the manage- 
ment of estates. He is the author of the 
chapter on the Medical History of Waltham 
and Wayland in the History of Middlesex 
County, a three-volume publication of 1890. 



§AMES MILLS ANDREWS, an enter- 
prising building contractor of Somer- 
ville and a member of the Board of 
Aldermen, was born in Freedom, N.H., 
May 22, 1837, son of Thomas and Clara 
(Mills) Andrews. His paternal grandfather, 
also named Thomas Andrews, was a native of 
Machias, Me., but spent the greater part of 
his life upon a farm in Saco, and served as Se- 
lectman in that town. His last days were 
passed in Freedom, N.H. 

Thomas Andrews, father of James M., was 
born in Saco. When a young man he settled 
in Freedom, where he tilled the soil energeti- 
cally and successfully during his active years. 
His wife, Clara, v/ho was a daughter of John 
Mills, a prosperous farmer of Parsonsiield, 
Me., became the mother of five children, of 
whom two are living, namely: James M., the 
subject of this sketch; and Charles H. 

James Mills Andrews was educated in the 
common and high schools of Freedom, and as- 
sisted in carrying on the homestead farm until 
he was seventeen years old. He was then ap- 
prenticed to the carpenter's trade, and shortly 
after completing his time he came to Charles- 
town, where he entered the employ of Amos 
Brown, with whom he remained for six years. 
Then he worked for Page & Littlefield, by 
whom he was advanced to the position of fore- 



man. From 1866 to 1869 he was engaged in 
building the Baptist church of Freedom, and 
the railroad station, freight house, and other 
structures in Ossipee, N.H. Returning to 
Charlestown, he resumed his former position 
with Page & Littlefield, and remained with 
them until he established himself in business 
in Somerville in 1892. As a contractor and 
builder he has acquired a high reputation for 
reliability and integrity, and since beginning 
business on his own account he has erected 
the Cawley Hall at Charlestown Neck, the 
Hereford Block, containing thirty-seven ten- 
ements and six stores, and several handsome 
residences, all of them amply attesting the 
workmanlike manner in which he completes 
his contracts. Mr. Andrews married Mira 
A. Wood, daughter of Horace P. Wood, of 
Freedom, and has one son, Horace W. An- 
drews, who is associated with his father in 
business. 

In public matters Mr. Andrews displays the 
same ability and judgment which characterizes 
his business affairs, and he has zealously 
guarded the interests of his ward in both 
branches of the city government. He was 
made a Master Mason in i860, and has 
reached the thirty-second degree, Scottish 
Rite, has been a member of the Knights of 
Pythias since 1872, and is connected with sev- 
eral fraternal orders. 



RTHUR M. STEWART, a real es- 
tate dealer of Cambridge and an ex- 
member of the City Council, was 
born in Dexter, Me., April 26, 
1853, son of David W. and Rebecca (Packard) 
Stewart. His paternal great-grandfather emi- 
grated from Scotland; and his grandfather, 
who was a prosperous farmer, died at the age 
of seventy years. David W. Stewart was 
reared to agricultural pursuits, and his active 
years have been chiefly spent in tilling the 
soil. In 1S61 he enlisted as a private in 
Company C, Sixty-first Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, and served through the war. 
At the siege of Petersburg he was struck by a 
bullet, which passed through his canteen and 
clothing. After his discharge in 1865 he re- 
turned to Maine, and is now residing upon a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farm in Garland. His wife, Rebecca, be- 
came the mother of five sons and one daugh- 
ter, of whom Arthur M. was the second-born. 
Arthur M. Stewart grew to manhood in 
Corinna, Me., his parents having moved to 
that place when he was an infant. They later 
moved to Garland, Me. He was educated in 
the Corinna Academy. At the age of twenty 
years he settled in Cambridge, with a hope 
that a change of scene and occupation might 
improve his health, which had begun to fail. 
He was employed as an expressman for a year 
and then took a position as clerk in a retail 
grocery store, where he remained for nine 
years. In 1886 he started in the real estate 
business, and has since been actively engaged 
in improving land and erecting buildings. In 
State and national politics he supports the Re- 
publican party. While a member of the Com- 
mon Council in 1893 and 1894, he served 
upon the Committees on Finance and Health. 
He has acted as a Constable for six years, 
and in 1896 was appointed as Assistant As- 
sessor. He is a member of Dunster Lodge, 
No. 222, I. O. O. F. In October, 1S81, Mr. 
Stewart was united in marriage with Hannah 
F. Reed, of this city, and has two children — 
Percy R. and Eva E. 



lATHANIEL HUTCHINSON, who 
owns and cultivates a productive farm 
in the village of Carlisle, Middle- 
sex County, Mass., was born in this 
town, October 14, 1820, son of Nathaniel and 
Susanna (Wheeler) Hutchinson. His grand- 
father, Nathaniel Hutchinson, first, who was 
a prosperous farmer and probably a native of 
Carlisle, married Thankful Snow, of West- 
ford, Mass. 

Nathaniel Hutchinson, second, father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Carlisle, 
December 21, 1785. He acquired a good ed- 
ucation, was in early life a school teacher, 
and obtained considerable local celebrity as an 
excellent penman. He was called to serve in 
various important offices, was a member of the 
Board of Selectmen, and acted as a Justice of 
the Peace. His wife, Susanna Wheeler, 
daughter of Joseph Wheeler, was born in Car- 
lisle, July 13, 1785. They were married May 



3, 1807, and she became the mother of four 
children, namely: Irene G. ; Addison L. ; 
Olive C. ; and Nathaniel, who is the third of 
the name in direct line. The father died July 
20, 1820. His wife, long surviving him, died 
in April, 1875, in her ninetieth year. 

Sixty-five and seventy years ago, when Mr. 
Hutchinson was a boy, the present thriving 
city of Lowell was but a small village. There 
were no railroads; and farm produce, as he 
well remembers, was transported to Boston by 
ox teams. He began to work upon farms in 
his neighborhood at the age of nine years, in 
order to relieve his widowed mother of his 
support; and thenceforward he continued to 
labor as a farm assistant or at any other occu- 
pation offering good monthly wages, until he 
had accimnilated a sufficient sum with which 
to establish a home of his own, when he 
bought a farm located upon the banks of the 
Concord River. Selling that property some 
time later, he purchased his present farm in 
the village in 1853, and has since tilled the 
soil with energy and success. 

On April 14, 1844, Mr. Hutchinson was 
united in marriage with Martha Augusta 
Duren, who was born in Carlisle, January 14, 
1822, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Blood) 
Duren, both of whom were natives of this 
town. Her paternal grandfather, Reuben 
Duren, and her maternal grandfather, Fred- 
erick Blood, were residents of Carlisle. Her 
father inherited the Duren family homestead, 
and was engaged in farming until his death, 
which occurred in his fortieth year. He was 
a musician of local note, and for years played 
the bass viol in the choir of the Congrega- 
tional church. Mrs. Hutchinson was before 
marriage a school teacher, and taught in Car- 
lisle and Atkinson, N.H. She inherited mu- 
sical ability from her father, and for a number 
of years led the singing in church. She is 
the mother of one son, Hiram Nathaniel 
Hutchinson, who is now engaged in business 
in Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Hutchinson cast his first Presidential 
vote for James K. Polk, but, differing with 
the Democratic party in regard to slavery, 
later joined the Republican movement. He 
was formerly a member of the Board of Select- 
men of Carlisle and an Assessor. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In 1894 Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson cele- 
brated the golden anniversary of their wed- 
ding, and on that occasion they were the re- 
cipients of many valuable presents. 



'ON. AUGUSTINE J. DALY, of 
Cambridge, Mass., Special Justice 
for the Third District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex, was born in 
Canaan, Conn., May 6, 1861, son of William 
A. and Mary Daly. He is of Irish descent. 
His father, who formerly carried on a woollen- 
mill in Canaan, moved thence to Pittsfield, 
Mass., where he still resides. 

Augustine J. Daly is the eldest of a family 
of six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters. In his childhood and youth he attended 
the public schools of Pittsfield, including the 
high school; and, as he advanced in years, 
while pursuing his studies his leisure time 
was spent in mercantile employment. For 
about three years he was clerk in a wholesale 
grocery store, and after teaching school for a 
year he took a position as clerk and book- 
keeper in the oiifice of the Pontoosuc Woollen 
Mills. While thus employed he gave some 
attention to the study of law, under the direc- 
tion of Messrs. Plunket and Turtle, of Pitts- 
field; and he spent some time in their office. 
He was graduated from the Boston University 
Law School with the class of 1887; and, after 
his admission to the Suffolk County bar in 
July of that year, he was in the office of 
Thomas J. Gargan in Boston eight months. 
He then opened an office in Cambridge, where 
he soon acquired a good practice. In 1891 he 
was appointed by Governor Russell a Special 
Justice of the Third District Court, Eastern 
Middlesex, and has since occupied that posi- 
tion. 

Judge Daly was appointed a trustee of the 
Cambridge Public Library in 1894 by Mayor 
Bancroft, and has recently been reappointed 
by Mayor Sortwell. He is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus, the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, the Catholic Union, the Catholic 
Alumni Association of Boston, the Colonial 
Club, and the First Volunteer Veterans' As- 
sociation of Cambridge. 

On November 24, 1889, Judge Daly was 



united in marriage with Mary McCarthy, of 
Lee, Mass. 



<5tRA GERRY.— Although some twenty- 
H I two years have elapsed since the death 
g[|_ of the subject of this sketch, a record of 
the successful business men and esti- 
mable citizens of Stoneham, where he was a 
lifelong resident, would be incomplete with- 
out allotting a share of space to his honorable 
career. 

The late Ira Gerry, youngest son of Captain 
David and Sarah (Richardson) Gerry, was 
born in Stoneham, June 29, 1806, and was a 
descendant in the fifth generation of Thomas 
Gerry, the original American ancestor of the 
family. Captain David Gerry, who was a 
prominent man of Stoneham in his day, owned 
a large farm located at the corner of Central 
and Winter Streets, where he kept a hotel for 
many years, his estate comprising a large part 
of what is now the most thickly settled por- 
tion of the town. 

Ira Gerry was left fatherless when nine 
months old, but his early training was super- 
intended by an affectionate and intelligent 
mother, who was a woman of unusual strength 
of character. Although his education was 
limited to that afforded by the common 
schools of his native town, his intellectual 
faculties prompted him to seek knowledge 
through his own exertions, which enabled him 
eventually to possess a well-trained mind. 
At the age of twenty-one he became associated 
with his brother in the manufacture of chil- 
dren's shoes. The firm also conducted a gen- 
eral store, and carried on a thriving trade 
until failing health caused his partner to re- 
tire; and after that Mr. Gerry for some time 
continued the business alone. In 1844 he 
found it necessary to change his business for 
one that would afford more out-of-door recrea- 
tion; and, disposing of his mercantile and 
manufacturing enterprises, he succeeded to 
the legal business formerly transacted by 
Squire Peter Hay, a well-known figure in 
Stoneham at that period. A glance at the 
records of deeds, mortgages, wills, and other 
legal documents written by him, shows that 
he transacted business enough in that line to 




IRA GERRY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



furnish any well-established lawyer with a lu- 
crative office practice. He was for years the 
principal conveyancer in town, attended to a 
great deal of probate work, negotiated and 
wrote fire insurance, and was a prosperous 
financier. He was the first president of the 
Stoneham Five Cent Savings Bank, became 
its treasurer in 1862, and during his eleven 
years' occupancy of that position his careful 
management was the means of increasing its 
deposits from nine thousand to a quarter of a 
million dollars. In financial and business 
matters he was a wise counsellor and a trust- 
worthy friend ; and few men in a community 
ever enjoyed more completely the general con- 
fidence of neighbors, who sought his advice 
when needed, and entrusted to him the care 
and settlement of their estates. 

Politically, Mr. Gerry was a Democrat, and 
during the bitter anti-slavery agitation in 1837 
he earnestly and forcibly advocated the rights 
of free speech for all parties. He was fre- 
quently called to serve in town affairs, and at 
the age of thirty years was elected a Repre- 
sentative to the legislature. When a young 
man he recognized the evil resulting from the 
liquor traffic and the danger to be avoided by 
its suppression ; and, although it was custom- 
ary in those days for every general store- 
keeper to carry a stock of liquors, he banished 
the article from his place of business. He 
inherited from his father land that grew more 
valuable as the resources and population of 
the town increased, and he became the owner 
of much desirable property. Mr. Gerry died 
November 23, 1875, in his seventieth year. 
The gentle elements of his character were dis- 
played in his domestic life. He married at 
the age of twenty-si.K Paulina, daughter of 
Robert Gerry, with whom he lived happily for 
forty-four years, and, passing away, left to 
her a memory made beautiful by the most in- 
dulgent and affectionate devotion. 



DWARD F. WORCESTER, an enter- 
prising newsdealer and printer at Hud- 
son, was born in Marlboro, Mass., 
April I, 1867, son of William E. C. and 
Harriet L. S. (Teel) Worcester. He is a 
lineal descendant of the Rev. William 



Worcester, who emigrated with his family 
from England to Massachusetts, was settled as 
pastor of the church in Salisbury between 
1638 and 1640, and continued in charge until 
his death, October 28, 1662. 

Samuel Worcester, son of the Rev. Will- 
iam, accompanied his parents from England, 
and for some years was part owner of a saw- 
mill in Salisbury. He was the first Repre- 
sentative to the General Court from Bradford, 
Mass., taking his seat in January, 1679-80, 
and was re-elected for the following year, 
1680-81. In February he started on foot to 
attend an adjourned meeting in Boston. Ar- 
riving at Saugus on the night of the twen- 
tieth, and, being unable to obtain accommo- 
dations at the inn, he determined to pass the 
night with a friend. On the morning of the 
twenty-first his lifeless body was found in the 
middle of the road in the attitude of kneeling. 
He was a progressive as well as a pious man, 
and took an active part in the early settlement 
of Bradford. 

Francis Worcester, son of Samuel, was a 
native of Rowley, Mass. He was a yeoman 
and an innholder in Bradford, and as a man 
was noted for his amiable disposition and ex- 
treme piety. He died December 17, 17 17. 
On January 29, 1 690-1, he married Mary 
Cheney, born September 2, 1671, daughter of 
Peter Cheney, of Newbury, Mass. 

The Rev. Francis Worcester, son of 
Francis, was born in Bradford, June 7, 1698. 
He resided' in his native town until 1722, and 
for the succeeding five or six years he fol- 
lowed the blacksmith's trade in Concord and 
Littleton, Mass. Returning to Bradford in 
1728, he was a Selectman. Some time later, 
receiving a license to preach, he was on June 
18, 1735, installed pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church in Sandwich, Mass., where he 
remained eleven years. He preached in Exe- 
ter and Plaistow, N.H., for a time, moving 
to HoUis, N.H., in 1750; and from that year 
until his death, which occurred October 4, 
1783, he labored a greater part of the time 
as an evangelist in New Hampshire and other 
parts of New England. The Rev. Francis 
Worcester was an indefatigable worker, who 
accomplished much toward extending the 
Congregational faith. In 1760 he wrote a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



series of meditations in verse, which shows 
the author to have been a close student of 
the Bible. His first wife, whom he married 
April i8, 1720, was Abigail Carlton, of Row- 
ley, who died July 25, 1774; and his second 
wife was a Mrs. Martin. 

Noah Worcester, son of the Rev. Francis, 
and great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Sandwich, October 4, 
1735. He succeeded to the ownership of the 
homestead in Hollis, whence in the winter of 
1775 and 1776 he marched at the head of a 
company of volunteers to re-enforce General 
Washington at Cambridge. He possessed 
superior mental faculties and an upright char- 
acter, which gave prestige to his councils; 
and many of his sayings and maxims became 
proverbial among his neighbors. For forty 
years he acted as a Justice of the Peace. He 
was a delegate to the convention which framed 
the constitution of the State of New Hamp- 
shire, and was a member of the church for 
sixty years. On February 22, 1757, he mar- 
ried for his first wife Lydia Taylor, born Oc- 
tober II, 1733, daughter of Abraham Taylor, 
of Hollis. She died July 6, 1772. His 
second wife, Hephzibah Sherwin, whom he 
married September 29, 1772, was born in 
Bradford, April 30, 1746, and died in July, 
1831. 

James Worcester, grandfather of Edward F. , 
was born in Hollis, February 23, 1788. He 
acquired a good education in his early years, 
and subsequently learned the painter's trade, 
which he followed in connection with teaching 
the greater part of his life. He moved to 
Tyngsboro, Mass., in 1815, to Fitch burg in 
181 7, to Damariscotta, Me., in 1825, to 
South Boston in 1829, and a short time later 
to Charlestown, Mass. He finally returned to 
Hollis, where he died May 3, 1833. On 
April I, 1813, he married for his first wife 
Mary Lawrence, who was born June 16, 1791, 
daughter of Daniel Lawrence, of Hollis, and 
died August 16, 1823. On February 17, 
1825, he married for his second wife Pru- 
dence Blood, born March 12, 1786, daughter 
of Joseph Blood, of Harvard, Mass. 

William E. C. Worcester, Edward F. 
Worcester's father, was born in Damariscotta, 
Me., February 24, 1826, and was reared in 



Charlestown, Mass. He was educated in the 
public schools of that town and at the Read- 
ing Academy, and after completing his studies 
he learned the painter's trade. He came to 
what is now Hudson in 1849, 3"*^ continued 
to carry on the painting business as long as 
his health would permit. He was employed 
by F. Brigham as foreman for some years, and 
in 1 861 went to Marlboro, where he acted in 
the same capacity for Boyd & Corey until Oc- 
tober, 1862, when he enlisted in Company I, 
Fifth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers. 
He was elected Captain of the company, ap- 
pointed Major of the regiment before starting 
for the front, and served the stipulated term. 
He re-enlisted in July, 1864, and as Lieu- 
tenant Colonel of the Fifth had command of 
Federal Hill. After his discharge he re- 
sumed his former position with Boyd & Corey, 
remaining as their foreman until 1869, when 
he returned to Hudson, and for some time had 
charge of the stitching-room in the factory of 
George Houghton. In 1876 he re-established 
himself in the house and sign painting busi- 
ness, which he conducted successfully until 
1884, when he was appointed Postmaster by 
President Arthur. He continued as such 
under Presidents Cleveland and Harrison, 
holding office until his death, which occurred 
November 4, 1895. Politically, he was a Re- 
publican, and acted as chairman of the Town 
Committee for many years. He was a mem- 
ber of Doric Lodge, F. & A. M., of Hudson; 
was a Past Master of United Brethren Lodge 
of Marlboro ; Past Commander and for eleven 
years Recorder of Trinity Commandery, 
Knights Templar; and was appointed as aid 
upon the staff of Grand Commander Lawrence 
during the Triennial Conclave at Boston in 
1895. He was also a comrade of Reno Post, 
G. A. R. He was a member of the Unitarian 
church. His wife, who was before marriage 
Harriet L. S. Teel, was a daughter of Gershom 
Teel, of Charlestown. She became the 
mother of four children, two of whom attained 
maturity, namely: William F., who is no 
longer living; and Edward F., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Edward F. Worcester in his youth attended 
the public schools of Hutlson, and shortly 
after graduating he was appointed Assistant 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Postmaster, a position lie occupied for tiiree 
years. He was subsequently employed for 
two and one-half years by a wholesale commis- 
sion house in Boston, and for some time by 
the Apsley Rubber Company of Hudson. In 
1892 he bought his present business, which 
he has greatly enlarged since taking posses- 
sion, and he now deals extensively in news- 
papers, periodicals, magazines, stationery, 
confectionery, and kindred articles. He is 
also proprietor of the concern known as the 
Enterprise Printing Company, which he pur- 
chased in 1897, and carries on a general book 
and job printing business. Mr. Worcester 
takes a deep interest in public affairs, and for 
several years has acted as secretary of the Re- 
publican Town Committee. He is a Master 
Mason, being a member of Doric Lodge, and 
is Vice-Grand of Hudson Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
and member of King Saul Encampment of 
Marlboro. 

Mr. Worcester married Annie L. Fairbanks, 
daughter of Nestor S. Fairbanks, of Hudson. 
He attends the Unitarian church. 



ANIEL FRANCIS' LEARNED, 
one of the leading farmers of Bel- 
mont, Mass., is a native of Water- 
town, to which a part of Belmont 
form£rly belonged. He was born on May 23, 
1825, a son of Daniel and Lucy (Livermore) 
Learned, and is a representative of the eighth 
generation in descent from William Learned, 
who, with "Goodith, his wife," was admitted 
to the First Church in Charlestown, Mass., in 
"1632, 10 mo., day 6," they having come to 
this country some years before with four chil- 
dren, the youngest, Isaac, baptized in Eng- 
land, February 25, 1623-4. 

William Learned in 1642 was one of the 
seven founders of the church at Woburn, and 
later he held the offices of Selectman and 
Constable in that town. He was a farmer by 
occupation. He died in 1646. Plis son, 
Isaac Learned, married Mary Stearns, of 
Watertown, and had six children. Benoni, 
the youngest of these, born in Chelmsford, 
Mass., settled in Sherborn, and was a very 
prominent citizen, holding at different times 
the positions of Selectman, Town Treasurer, 



and Representative to the General Court. 
He was an earnest member of the church, in 
which he was Deacon for a number of years. 
His first wife, Mary Fanning, died in 1688, 
leaving three children; and his second wife, 
Sarah Wright, of Sudbury, was the mother of 
nine children. 

Thomas Learned, eldest son of Benoni and 
Mary Learned, was a potter by trade. He 
spent the earlier part of his life in Sherborn, 
but afterward kept a public house, known as 
Learned 's Tavern, in Watertown. To him 
and his wife, Mary Mason, were born fourteen 
children. The eldest child, Jonathan, a 
farmer, was born in Watertown in 1708. He 
married Hannah White, and they had ten 
children. Their fourth child, Thomas, who 
was born in Watertown in 1734, was a black- 
smith by trade. He was probably a member 
of Colonel William Brattle's regiment, that 
marched on alarm for relief of Fort William 
Henry, August 16, 1757. His name is also 
on the Lexington alarm list, April 19, 1775. 
By his union in marriage with Deborah 
Brown, of Cambridge, he had seven children, 
of whom the second was Paul, the grandfather 
of Daniel Francis, the subject of this sketch. 
Paul Learned was a farmer in Watertown for 
many years, and died there in 1837. He was 
a very devout man, an earnest member of the 
Unitarian church. His wife was Anna 
Sanger, and they had four children, of whom 
the third child and youngest son was Daniel, 
born August 31, 1791, Mr. Daniel F. 
Learned's father. 

Daniel Learned was a store keeper in 
Watertown for a short time, but his chief oc- 
cupation was farming. He purchased in 1824 
the land where his son, the subject of this 
sketch, now lives. Both he and his wife were 
members of the L^nitarian church, and in pol- 
itics he was a Whig. He died in 1864, at the 
age of seventy-three. His wife, Lucy, a 
daughter of Amos Livermore, of Watertown, 
died at the age of seventy-seven. They had 
six children, of whom four are now living, 
namely: Lucy A.; Daniel Francis; Harriet 
Louisa, who married George F. Whiting, and 
has two children; and Adeline Elizabeth, who 
married B. Franklin Bacon, and has two chil- 
dren. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Daniel Francis Learned was educated in the 
public schools of IJelmont. He began farm- 
ing at an early age, and has continued that 
occupation up to the present time. He is a 
progressive man, and has a flourishing farm 
in Belmont. He is a Republican in politics 
and a forwarder of all movements that tend to 
promote the welfare of the town. He has 
been on the School Committee for twenty 
years, and has been chairman of the board 
part of that time. He is a member of the 
Unitarian church. Mr. Learned was married 
December 15, 1853, to Emma N. Seger, of 
Roxbury, Mass. Five children — Anna Ger- 
trude, Lillie Jasper, Carrie Augusta, Marion 
Frances, and Lucy Seger — have been born to 
them, but only the first two are now living. 



§DANA HOVEY, who died at his 
home in Cambridge, February 3, 
1897, was a successful merchant and 
a highly esteemed resident of this 
city. He was born at the old family home- 
stead on Brookline Street, March 31, 18 13, 
son of Phineas B. Hovey. Several genera- 
tions of his ancestry resided in Cambridge, 
and were identified with the early growth of 
the town during the Colonial period. 

In a building which Phineas B. Hovey 
erected in 1797, he conducted a general mer- 
chandise store, and for many years exchanged 
goods with the neighboring farmers for prod- 
uce. This building is still used for mercan- 
tile purposes, and is occupied by his grand- 
son. Phineas eventually admitted his son to 
partnership, and for years the firm of P. B. 
Hovey & Co. was prominent among the mer- 
cantile houses of Cambridge. Phineas B. 
Hovey died April 19, 1852. 

J. Dana Hovey was educated in the Cam- 
bridge public schools, and at an early age en- 
tered his father's store as a clerk. Later on, 
as a partner in the concern, he displayed the 
same sterling integrity and apt business qual- 
ifications that were characteristic of his 
father; and, finally succeeding to the entire 
ownership of the business, he carried it on 
alone until his death. He served in the 
Common Council, and for several years was a 
member of the Volunteer Fire Department. 



His wife, whose maiden name was Atlantic 
Pierce, was a native of Cambridge. She be- 
came the mother of one son, Dana R., and two 
daughters, the son being eldest of the three. 
Mrs. J. Dana Hovey died in 1888. 

Dana R. Hovey was born September 8, 
1838. After completing his education in the 
schools of this city, he began his mercantile 
career in his father's store, with the business 
of which he has been identified ever since. 
He is the administrator of his father's estate. 
Mr. Hovey married in 1868 Nellie M., 
daughter of William Murray, of Portland, Me. 
Two children were born of this union, but 
neither of them lived to maturity. Mrs. 
Nellie M. Hovey died May 26, 1887. Mr. 
Dana R. Hovey was for some time a member 
of the fire department, serving as foreman of 
Engine No. 4. He has held some of the 
offices in Dunster Lodge, No. 220, I. O. O. F. ; 
is Senior Warden of Charles River Encamp- 
ment, No. 22; is a Past Chancellor of St. 
Omar Lodge, No. 9, Knights of Pythias; Past 
Sachem of Massachusetts Tribe, No. 44, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men ; and is a member 
of General Putnam . Colony, of the United 
Order of Pilgrim Fathers. 



tATHANIEL CHURCHILL 
BARKER, a medalled veteran of the 
late Civil War, residing in Somer- 
■"■^ ville, Mass., was born in Piermont, 
N.H., on September 28, 1836, son of Samuel 
and Sarah F. (Jackson) Barker. The family 
is said to be of Scotch origin. Mr. Barker's 
paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Barker, was a 
farmer and resided in New Hampshire, living 
to an advanced age. 

Samuel Barker, who was born in 1808, was 
a wheelwright and blacksmith, and spent the 
greater part of his life in Manchester and in 
Piermont, N.H. He died in the last-named 
place, at the age of seventy-four years. To 
him and his wife, Sarah, were born eight chil- 
dren, as follows: James J.; John B., who 
died in infancy; Nathaniel Churchill, of 
Somerville; Calista, who is the wife of Orrin 
Tabor, of Oakland, Cal. ; John A., who is 
city messenger in Manchester, N.H. ; Jason 
S., who was killed during the late war; Fa- 




PUBLIC 



ENOS B. PHILLIPS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



63 



melia, who is the wife of Abner Chase; and 
Artemas J. Barker, a member of the fire de- 
partment of Manchester, N.H. 

Nathaniel Churchill, the third son as 
named above, spent his boyhood in Landaff, 
N.H., and attended the public schools of that 
town. He subsequently worked at farming 
until the age of seventeen, when he went to 
Manchester, N. H., and secured employment 
in the Amoskeag Mills. He remained there 
until the breaking out of the Southern Rebell- 
ion. In August, 1862, he enlisted from 
Merrimac in Company E of the Eleventh 
New Hampshire Regiment of Volunteers. 
Before the regiment left the State he was 
made Corporal, and subsequently, for merito- 
rious service, was promoted to the rank of 
Sergeant. 

The first battle in which he took part was 
the battle of Fredericksburg, where his 
brother fell. Later he fought at the siege of 
Vicksburg, at Jackson, Miss., at the siege of 
Knoxsville, at Fort Saunders, and at the 
battles of the Wilderness, North Anna, 
Gaines's Mills, Bethesda Church, and Cold 
Harbor. At the last-named battle he was 
wounded, and for the succeeding eleven 
months was disabled. He was sent to the 
hospital at Washington and later to New 
Haven. From there he transferred to Read- 
ville and thence to Manchester, N.H., where 
he was detailed as aid to the chief steward, 
and had partial charge of the guards. On 
May 25, 1865, he was discharged as unfit for 
further service. 

Remaining in New Hampshire, he went to 
work in the mills for a time, but was subse- 
quently appointed turnkey of the Hillsborough 
County jail, in which position he remained for 
a year and a half. He then worked in the 
Manchester Locomotive Works until 1870, 
when he came to Somerville, and here for 
eighteen years he followed carpentering. In 
1877 he was appointed Assistant Chief of the 
Somerville Fire Department, and in 1888 he 
was made Superintendent of Street Watering, 
in which capacity he is now serving. 

Mr. Barker married Wealthy A. Melvin, 
daughter of Reuben and Gizett (Smith) Mel- 
vin and a descendant on her mother's side of 
one of the old Colonial families. One son 



has been born of this marriage; namely, 
Edgar Clifford Barker, who is clerk in the 
Boston office of a French steamship line. 

Through the efforts of this son the story of 
Mr. Barker's bravery during the late war was 
made known to the President of the United 
States, and as the result the following letter 
was received by Mr. Barker on the first day of 
September, 1897: — 

You are hereby notified by the President that under 
the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1863, provid- 
ing for the presentation of medals of honor to such offi- 
cers and non-commissioned officers and privates as have 
most distinguished themselves in action, a Congressional 
medal of honor has this day been presented to you for 
most distinguished gallantry of action, the following 
being a statement of the particular service : At Spott- 
sylvania, May 12, 1S64, this soldier, then a Sergeant in 
Company E of the Eleventh New Hampshire Volun- 
teers, having taken the place of one of the color bearers 
who had been killed, and seeing the bearer of the other 
regimental flag shot down, seized the falling standard, 
and throughout the remainder of that battle carried both 
the national and the State colors. Six color bearers of 
his regiment were killed or wounded before Sergeant 
Barker voluntarily took the flags. He was also wounded 
in action. 

(Signed) Alger, Secretary of War. 

The medal is a handsome bronze inscribed 
on the reverse, "The Congress to Sergeant 
Nathaniel C. Barker, Company E, Eleventh 
New Hampshire Volunteers, for gallantry at 
Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864." Less than 
fifteen hundred of these have been given by 
the United States to soldiers. The presenta- 
tion speech was made by Will C. Wood, the 
chaplain of the old regiment, on October 15, 
1897. 

Mr. Barker is a member of Mechanics' 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Manchester, N.H.; of Willard C. Kinsley 
Post, No. 139, G. A. R. ; and of the Veteran 
Firemen's Association. In politics he is a 
Republican. 



|NOS BURT PHILLIPS, who died at 
his home in Cambridgeport on Febru- 
ary 21, 1896, was one of the promi- 
nent business men of Boston, identified with 
a number of metal working concerns. He 
was born in Taunton, Mass., December 7, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1832, son of William Stoddard and Hannah 
(Burt) Phillips, both natives of Taunton. 
His paternal grandparents were John and 
Deborah (Phillips) Phillips. He had three 
brothers and three sisters, namely: William 
H. ; John M. ; Otis; Maria, now deceased, 
who was the wife of Isaac Fish ; Deborah, 
widow of Leonard Burt, residing in Taunton; 
and Mary, wife of Theodre Marvel also of 
that city. 

Enos Burt Phillips spent his early life in 
Taunton, attending school and assisting in the 
support of the family, his father having died 
when the children were young. At the age of 
seventeen he went to Providence, and learned 
the moulder's trade; and in 1858 he found 
employment in Boston with the firm of J. J. 
Walworth & Co., in the iron and brass foun- 
dry. After being with that firm several 
years, he formed a copartnership with Albert 
E. Mowry in the metal business, the firm 
name being Mowry & Phillips. At the time 
of his death he was sole proprietor of the con- 
cern. Mr. Phillips was a large stockholder 
and treasurer of the American Steam Gauge 
Company, in fact, being the head of the cor- 
poration up to the time of his death. He was 
also vice-president of the Citizens' Trade As- 
sociation and a director in the Co-operative 
Bank of Cambridge. 

Actively interested in municipal affairs, he 
was a member of the Board of Aldermen in 
1 89 1 and 1892, and was elected to the Cam- 
bridge Water Board in 189S, but was obliged 
to resign on account of failing health. Mr. 
Phillips was a charter member of Mizpah 
Lodge, F. & A. M.: and of the Royal Arch 
Chapter. He belonged to Boston Command- 
ery, Knights Templar; and to the Colonial, 
the Massachusetts, and the Universal ist 
Clubs. He gave freely of his time and money 
for the advancement of the interests of the 
First Universalist Church, and was chairman 
of the Church Committee. 

Mr. Phillips was married on May i, 1876, 
to Miss Martha B. Swift, daughter of Alex- 
ander and Betsey (Hamblin) Swift, both, like 
herself, natives of Wareham, Mass. Her 
father was the son of Captain Elisha Swift, of 
that town. Mrs. Phillips has two sisters — 
Ada A. and Lucy E. Swift. She is the 



mother of six children, four of whom are liv- 
ing — Ralph Burt, Alice Bertina, Walter 
Enos, and Otis Swift. 



/fjrEORGE E. BLISS, late a well-known 
Vf^T cigar manufacturer and prominent 

— citizen of Natick, was born in Dover, 
Mass., January 7, 1851, son of Linus and 
Martha (Soule) Bliss. Linus Bliss was long 
known to smokers throughout New England 
as a manufacturer of fine cigars. His chil- 
dren now living are: Charles L. Bliss, of 
Marlboro; Mrs. Josephine Horn Lawrence; 
Mrs. Ella Hartwell Lawrence; and Mrs. 
Louisa Howard, of Winchester. 

George E. Bliss began the manufacture of 
cigars about twenty years ago in a factory on 
Common Street in Natick, and continued the 
business with great success during the rest of 
his life. He was popular among his fellow- 
townsmen, and about two years before his 
death was prevailed upon, though against his 
inclination, to accept the candidacy on the 
citizens' ticket for Selectman. After the 
caucus, finding that the other candidates on 
the ticket were inexperienced, like himself, 
he withdrew his name. A year later, being 
again nominated and subsequently elected, he 
was chosen chairman of the board by his col- 
leagues. He had no taste for office, however, 
though possessing in a large degree the quali- 
ties necessary to make a successful public 
ofificial. He was a man of good judgment and 
foresight, conscientious in the performance of 
his duties, and remarkable for great decision 
of character. His death occurred January 10, 
1897, and was the first instance in Natick of 
a Selectman dying while in office. All the 
stores were closed during his funeral services, 
which were attended by a large assemblage of 
townspeople. Mr. Bliss was a prominent 
Mason, having joined the order in Dover be- 
fore coming to Natick. After coming here he 
formed the Meridian Lodge, F. & A. M. He 
was a member of Natick Commandery, K. T. ; 
Parker Chapter, R. A. M. ; and Aleppo 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Until about 
two years before his death he belonged also 
to Tapawambait Lodge, I. O. O. F. 

Mr. Bliss was married April 15, 1871, to 



lOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Elizabeth T. Shaw, of Great Barrington, who 
bore him two children, a son and daughter. 
The son, Linus, died at the age of nine years; 
the daughter, Hattie S., now Mrs. Arthur 
Boardman, resides in Natick, of which place 
Mrs. Bliss is also a resident. 



AVID AUGUSTUS SANBORN, a 
well-known real estate agent of 
Somerville, was born here on April 
21, 182S, son of David Ambrose 
and Hannah (Stone) Sanborn. His father 
was a native of New Hampshire, where the 
family, which is of English origin, was estab- 
lished in early Colonial days. 

John, William, and Stephen Sanborn, grand- 
sons of the Rev. Stephen Bachiler, received 
grants of land at Hampton, N.H., in 1640. 
Stephen a few years later returned to Eng- 
land. His brothers married, and have been 
succeeded by a numerous posterity. Elder 
Robert Sanborn, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was a leading farmer in Sand- 
wich, N.H., and resided there throughout his 
life. His son, David Ambrose, above namiCd, 
was born in that town, and remained there 
until the age of eighteen. He came to 
Charlestown, now Somerville, in 1837, and 
resided here, engaged in farming, until his 
death, at the age of eighty -two. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Hannah Stone, was 
the daughter of John Stone and descendant of 
one of the old and leading families of Somer- 
ville. She was the mother of five children, 
of whom only one survives. 

David Augustus Sanborn received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Somerville, 
and subsequently learned the carpenter's 
trade. He followed this occupation as a jour- 
neyman and contractor far more than thirty 
years, and at the end of that period engaged 
in real estate transactions. He built and 
now owns a number of houses, and m.ost of his 
time is spent in looking after his property. 
He has always been public-spirited, and takes 
great pride in his native city, which he has 
served in various public positions. In 1876 
he was a member of the Common Council, 
and in 1888 and 1889 he was on the Board of 
Assessors. Formerly he was connected with 



the fire department, and for seven years was 
chief of the department. 

Mr. Sanborn is married to Ann S., daugh- 
ter of John C. Magoun, a member of one of 
the most prominent families in Somerville. 
Two children have been born of this union: 
John Walter Sanborn, who is in the Chamber 
of Commerce, Boston ; and Adeline Louise. 
Mr. Sanborn has been for twenty-five years a 
member of the First Universalist Church in 
Somerville. 



fHOMAS HENRY BREWER, of Har- 
vard Square, Cambridge, well known 
as a veteran in the provision business 
in this city, was born November 27, 1S34, at 
East Cambridge, where his father and mother, 
Richard and Abigail (Gill) Brewer, had set- 
tled on coming to America from England 
soon after their marriage. Richard Brewer 
was the son of well-to-do parents, who gave 
him a good education. He died before reach- 
ing middle life, being accidentally drowned 
in 1836. He left three children — Frances 
A., Thomas H., and David. Frances A., the 
only daughter, is the wife of Adolph Vogle, 
and resides in Cambridge; and David Brewer, 
like his brother, here carries on a provision 
business. 

Left fatherless when scarcely two years 
old, Thomas remained in the care of his 
mother till he was twelve. He then went to 
live in Cambridge with Mr. Samuel Newell, 
with whom he stayed three years. He was 
educated in the public schools, completing 
his studies at the Washington Grammar 
School, of which Daniel Mansfield was the 
principal. At fifteen years of age he entered 
the employ of Thomas Stearns, the proprietor 
of the new stage line, first as stage boy and 
afterward as driver. He acquired his earliest 
business experience with the firm of Wood & 
Hall, Cambridge grocers; and in November, 
1855, more than forty years ago, he started in 
the provision business for himself. He was 
at first located on Brighton Street, now Boyls- 
ton Street, whence he removed to his present 
well-known stand in Harvard Square. It is 
said that he has been continuously in business 
longer than any other man in the city. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Brewer's first wife, Mary J. Colburn, 
of Temple, N.H., whom he married on March 
I, 1855, died in November, 1879. His sec- 
ond wife, Katharine Maud Hill, of New York, 
whom he married on December 31, 1880, died 
leaving one child named Gardner Brewer. 
On January 24, 1895, he married Delia M. 
Seloy, of Pomfret, Vt. By his first marriage 
Mr. Brewer has four children — Fannie Col- 
burn, Ella Colburn, Thomas H., Jr., and 
Charles Wilder. The family attend the Rev. 
Dr. Alexander McKenzie's church. 

Mr. Brewer has always taken a lively inter- 
est in local public affairs. He was a prime 
mover in the widening of Brattle Street and 
in the building of the City Building in Ward 
One. He has in his possession a wheel-bar- 
row presented to him at the time that ground 
was first broken for that building. In 1866 
numerous incendiary fires consumed property 
in Cambridge, and Mr. Brewer was influential 
in ferreting out the fire-bugs, and bringing 
them to justice. A year later, when Brigh- 
ton was beset in the same way, Mr. Brewer 
and Mr. James M. Hilton, joining their efforts 
in the search for the incendiaries, succeeded 
in shortly securing the conviction of thirteen 
men and one woman, and received for their 
services a reward of seven thousand dollars. 
Mr. Brewer is a member of the National 
Lancers of Boston, an organization with 
which he has been afifiliated since i860, a 
period of thirty-eight years. 



'^jDWARD HOLLEY HUNTER, propri- 
^ etor of the East Somerville Marble and 
'^" ^ ■ " ^ Granite Works, was born in Gran- 
ville, Washington County, N.Y. , on Febru- 
ary II, 1839, son of Dr. George and Martha 
A. (Holley) Hunter. His grandfather, 
Thomas Hunter by name, was the son of 
sturdy Highland Scotch parents, who came to 
America and settled in Virginia before the 
Revolution. At the breaking out of the war 
Thomas, who had become a farmer, enlisted 
in the cause of the colonies. He suffered the 
hardships and privations of a soldier's life 
during the whole of the great conflict, and 
after its close he was made warden of the 
prison at Windsor, Vt. His wife, Triphena 



Thatcher, who lived to the extreme age of one 
hundred years, was the mother of four chil- 
dren — Dr. George, Eli, Henry, and Rachel. 

Dr. George Hunter, who was born in Wind- 
sor, Vt., spent the most of his life in Boston, 
where for many years he was one of the lead- 
ing physicians. He'died there at the age of 
eighty-five. When a young man he lived in 
Dorset, Vt, and at that time he took a promi- 
nent part in public affairs. Eleven children 
were born to him and his wife, Martha A., 
who was the daughter of Justin and Elizabeth 
Holley. Nine grew to maturity, and six are 
now living, as follows: Henry M. ; John S. ; 
Thomas M.; Edward H.; Elizabeth, who is 
the wife of George Wyman ; and Agnes. 

Edward Holley Hunter lived in Granville 
for the first four years of his life, and then 
was taken by his parents to Dorset, Vt., 
where his school days were spent up to the 
age of fourteen, when he removed with his 
parents to Boston. He completed his studies 
at the old Dwight School in that city, and he 
subsequently learned the marble cutter's trade, 
serving his apprenticeship with Freedley & 
Lincoln. After remaining with them four 
years, he went in i86g to Keene, N.H., and 
started business for himself as a marble and 
granite worker. He stayed there, however, 
only a short time, and then returned to 
Boston. In April, 1883, he came to Somer- 
ville, and established his marble-cutting 
works on Broadway, whence in July, 1897, he 
removed to Perkins Street, East Somerville, 
his present place of business. Though 
warmly interested in public questions, Mr. 
Hunter has never cared to hold public office, 
as he has frequeiitly been importuned to do. 

Mr. Hunter married Maria A., daughter of 
Enos and Emily Bigelow. Four children 
have been born of this union, and three are 
now living; namely, Edward H., Jr., Helena 
v., and Everett B. 



ORACE PERKINS MAKECHNIE, 
A.M., M.D., a successful medical 
practitioner of West Somerville, 
officially connected with the numer- 
ous political, social, and fraternal organiza- 
tions in this locality, was born in Ripley, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



Me., April 15, 1841. His parents were 
Charles E. and Elizabeth G. (Hale) Makech- 
nie, his father being a grandson of Dr. John 
Makechnie, who came from Scotland in 
1755, and coming to this country settled in 
Maine. Dr. John Makechnie married Mary 
North, a native of Maine and a descendant of 
John North, who was born in England in 
1650. Joseph C. Makechnie, son of Dr. John 
and father of Charles E., was born in Maine, 
and reared to agricultural pursuits, which he 
followed during the active period of his life. 
He died in 1846. His wife, Electa P. Ben- 
nett, was born in 1777. 

Charles E. Makechnie, father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Athens, Me. ; and 
when a young man he settled upon a farm in 
the vicinity of his birthplace. His active 
years were devoted to tilling the soil, and he 
was one of the energetic and prosperous 
farmers of his neighborhood. Elizabeth G. 
Hale, his wife, a native of Ripley, was a de- 
scendant of Thomas Hale, who was born in 
England in 1606. One of her later ancestors 
was Captain Hale, who fought at Bunker 
Hill. Dr. Makechnie's maternal grandfather, 
Jacob Hale, was born in Ripley, November 
17, 1778, and was a lifelong resident of that 
town. He was one of the able and successful 
farmers of his day, and he took an active part 
in political affairs, serving as Representative 
to the legislature. He died in May, i860, 
aged eighty -two years. The following chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 
Makechnie: De.xter H. ; Hiram L. ; Charles 
A., who is no longer living; Horace P. 
M.D., the subject of this sketch; Olive A.; 
and George W. Makechnie. The father lived 
to be eighty years old, and the mother died 
in 1883, aged seventy-nine years. Both 
parents attended the Universalist church. 

Horace Perkins Makechnie acquired his ele- 
mentary education in the high schools of Dex- 
ter, Me., and Chelsea, Mass., and was gradu- 
ated at Tufts College in the class of 1865. 
For some time he was engaged in teaching at 
the Green Mountain Institute in Vermont; 
and in 1867 he was appointed principal of the 
Lincoln School, Somerville, a position which 
he ably and satisfactorily filled for eight 
years. Commencing the study of medicine 



under the direction of Dr. N. J. Knight, he 
entered Bellevue Hospital Medical. College in 
1877, and was graduated in 1879. After 
practising in Cambridge for six months, he 
returned to Somerville, where he has since re- 
sided, and has acquired a high reputation as a 
skilful and reliable physician. He is a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts State and American 
Medical Associations; the Cambridge and the 
Somerville Medical Improvement Societies, 
being president of the latter; is a member of 
the staff of the Somerville Hospital ; also a 
member of the Gynaecological Society of Bos- 
ton ; and is chairman of the Board of Exam- 
iners of Tufts Medical College. He has pre- 
pared several valuable papers upon timely 
topics, which have been listened to with in- 
terest by the members of the various medical 
societies, has contributed quite largely to the 
medical magazines, and upon one occasion he 
presented an interesting paper, entitled 
"Problems in Feeding School Children," at 
a meeting of the American Medical Associa- 
tion at Philadelphia. 

Dr. Makechnie is connected with Caleb 
Rand Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; the Knights of 
Pythias; the Order of the Golden Cross; the 
American Benefit Association ; the New Eng- 
land Order of Protection; the Home Circle; 
and the Knights of Honor. He is medical 
examiner for the above organizations, as well 
as for several life insurance companies; is a 
member of the Mystic Valley Club, the Sons 
of Maine, the various college societies, and 
the West Somerville Board of Trade. He is 
one of the directors of the Somerville Savings 
Bank, is interested in other city institutions, 
and for some years has served with ability 
upon the School Board. ' In politics he is a 
Republican, and was formerly president of the 
West Somerville Republican Club. He is 
an earnest advocate of temperance and total 
abstinence. 

In 1867 Dr. Makechnie was united in mar- 
riage with Harriet E. Johnson, who was born 
in Upton, Mass., daughter of Dexter H. and 
Rachel (Ruggles) Johnson, the former of 
whom was a prosperous farmer and a politician 
of local prominence. Mrs. Makechnie is the 
mother of two sons : Ernst Hale, who is now 
studying music in Paris; and Arthur North 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Makechnie, a pupil of the Latin School. 
The family attend the Universalist church. 



TT^HARLES F. BRYANT, of Somer- 
I Vr^ ville, Mass., member of the well- 
^^^- known business firm of John 
Bryant's Sons, was born in Charles- 
town on May 27, 1856, son of John and Sarah 
Naomi (Gove) Bryant. 

His father, John Bryant, son of John 
Bryant, Sr. , whose last years were passed in 
Charlestown, was born on August 18, 181 5, 
in Hanover, Plymouth County, this State. 
Pie removed to Chelsea with his parents when 
a child, and resided on a farm on the site of 
the Naval Hospital. After completing his 
schooling at the old training-field school in 
Charlestown, he learned the trade of wheel- 
wright and carriage builder, and subsequently 
established a business at 15 Austin Street, 
Charlestown, which he conducted for many 
years, and which is still continued by his 
sons. In 1852 he established the undertak- 
ing business, which is now the oldest of its 
kind in Charlestown. Mr. John Bryant was a 
man of great energy and of remarkable execu- 
tive ability, as is shown by his business 
career. He was widely known as John 
Bryant, the Charlestown undertaker. Never 
an aspirant for political honors, he lived the 
life of a quiet and somewhat retiring citizen, 
enjoying the cordial respect and earnest good 
will of a large number of acquaintances and 
friends. He was prominent in Odd Fellows 
circles, and went through all the chairs in 
Bunker Hill Lodge and Encampment. He 
was a member of the Old Volunteer Fire De- 
partment and Charlestown Veteran Fire Asso- 
ciation. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Sarah Gove, was the daughter of Solomon 
Gove, of North Edgecorab, Me., grand- 
daughter of David Gove, a farmer, and great- 
grand-daughter of Soloman Gove, one of the 
early Colonial settlers of Maine. In June, 
1893, Mr. and Mrs. John Bryant celebrated 
their golden wedding. John Bryant died on 
September 21, 1894. Of the four children 
born to him three are now living, and are 
carrying on the undertaker's business in 
Charlestown and Somerville. T. Weston 



Bryant is the eldest; John E. and Charles F. 
are twins. It may here be mentioned that a 
John Bryant of a remote generation, probably 
the immigrant progenitor of this family, was 
living, it is said, at Scituate, Mass., as early 
as 1639. 

Charles F. Bryant spent his boyhood in 
Charlestown. He attended the public schools, 
and subsequently took a course of study at 
Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College. 
After completing this course he worked as 
clerk in a publishing house on Cornhill, Bos- 
ton; but, his health failing, he found it neces- 
sary to live a less sedentary life, and so went 
to North Edgecomb, Me., where he spent 
some time on a farm. In 1890 he removed to 
Somerville, and associated himself in the 
undertaking business with his brothers; and 
three years later he took charge of the Somer- 
ville office of John Bryant's Sons, the office, 
which is located at 170 School Street, being 
opened in that year. 

In 1887 Mr. Bryant was united in marriage 
with Alice M. Sawin. Two children have 
been born of this union ; namely, Ruth Wal- 
cott and Esther Pamelia. Mr. Bryant is a 
member of Bunker Hill Lodge, No. 14,* Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows; of Winter 
Hill Lodge, No. 118, American Order of 
United Workmen; and of Prescott Council, 
No. 1385, Royal Arcanum. He is also a 
member of the Baptist church. 



§OHN C. MACKIN, principal of the 
grammar school in Hudson, Middlesex 
County, Mass., was born in Rockland, 
Plymouth County, May 3, 1864. He 
is a son of John and Lavinia (Libbey) Mackin; 
and on the paternal side he is of Scotch an- 
cestry, his father being a native of Ireland, 
born of Scotch parents. John Mackin came 
to America when a young man, and, settling 
in what was then East Abington, now Rock- 
land, learned the shoemaker's trade, which he 
has followed ever since. He served in the 
Civil War, enlisting in September, 1864, as a 
private in Company A, Third Regiment, 
Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. His wife is 
a daughter of Bennett Libbey, of Canterbury, 
N.H. Mr. and Mrs. John Mackin have been 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



blessed with three children, two of whom at- 
tained maturity: Mary Ella, wife of Alvin 
Bates, of Rockland, Mass. ; and John C, the 
special subject of this biographical sketch. 

John C. Mackin in his youth attended the 
public schools of his native town, graduating 
from the high school in 1S82. He then en- 
tered Tufts College, pursued the regular four 
years' course, and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts as a member of the class of 
1886. After spending a year in travel 
through the South, he was appointed principal 
of the Rockland Grammar School, of which he 
had charge three years. For one year he was 
submaster of the Marlboro High School, and 
in 1892 he was appointed principal of the 
Hudson Grammar School. A scholarly and 
stimulating instructor and a good disciplina- 
rian, he is one of the most popular teachers in 
Hudson. 

He was married in 1889 to Lilla, daughter 
of Gilman H. and Mary J. (Taylor) Cram, of 
Somerville, Mass., and has one son, Clarence 
Harvey. Mr. Mackin is a member of the 
Unitarian Church at Hudson and assistant 
superintendent in the Sunday-school, and is a 
trustee of the public library. As a Mason he 
is connected with Doric Lodge, F. & A. M. 
He is a member of Union Glee Club, Rock- 
land, Mass. 



§OHN SNOW SAWYER, for thirty 
years a prominent real estate broker 
and insurance agent of Cambridge, and 
still a resident of this city, was born 
in Fitchburg, Mass., September 6, 183 1, son 
of Manasseh and Dolly (Lincoln) Sawyer, 
and on both paternal and maternal sides of the 
house comes of old and substantial Colonial 
stock. 

Mr. Sawyer is much interested in geneal- 
ogy, and has spent considerable time in trac- 
ing the family back through different genera- 
tions. Early records, he finds, mention 
remote ancestors as having come from Nor- 
mandy to England in the eleventh century in 
the train of William the Conqueror, the first 
of the family in America, nearly four hundred 
years later, being William, Edward, and 
Thomas Sawyer, said to have been sons of 



John. William Sawyer was granted land in 
Salem in 1642, and in 1645 he settled at 
Newbury, where he died in 1678. Edward 
settled at Rowley in 1643. Thomas Sawyer, 
from whom the subject of this sketch is de- 
scended, was one of the first si.x settlers of the 
town of Lancaster, Mass., going there in 
1647, ^nd was very influential and very promi- 
nent during those early Colonial times. His 
wife, Mary Prescott, was the daughter of John 
Prescott, ancestor of Colonel Prescott, of 
Bunker Hill fame. From Thomas' the line 
was continued through his son Caleb,- Jona- 
than, ^ Manasseh, •• Jabez,s to Manasseh,'' father 
of the subject of this sketch. 

Many of Mr. Sawyer's ancestral connections 
were soldiers of the Revolution, freely hazard- 
ing their all in the defence of home and coun- 
try. Ephraim Sawyer, who had fought in the 
French and Indian War under General Am- 
herst, was a Major in Colonel John Whit- 
comb's regiment at the time of the battle of 
Bunker Hill; and later he held the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel, while his son, Ephraim, 
Jr., was successively a Lieutenant and Cap- 
tain. Another Sawyer, we are told, was at 
Monmouth and Brandy wine with Washington, 
another was one of Morgan's Rangers, and a 
third, a great-uncle of Mr. Sawyer of Cam- 
bridge, was with General Putnam and with 
"Mad Anthony Wayne" at the storming of 
Stony Point, and served throughout the war. 
Thomas, a far-off ancestor, it is said, narrowly 
escaped being burned at the stake. Hence it 
would appear that there is a deep strain of 
moral as well as of physical courage in the 
family. 

Manasseh Sawyer, father of Mr. John S. 
Sawyer, had business interests in Fitchburg, 
where he was one of the leading men. He 
took a warm interest in the welfare and devel- 
opment of the town, and served his fellow-cit- 
izens in various official capacities, being Se- 
lectman for a number of years. He was a 
warm friend of the Rev. Calvin Lincoln, for 
many years minister of the First Parish at 
Fitchburg, and later settled at Hingham. Of 
the three children born to Manasseh Sawyer 
and his wife, one died in infancy and one at 
the age of twenty-one years. 

Mr. John S. Sawyer is the only child of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



parents now living. He was educated in the 
common sciiools and high school of Fitchburg 
and at Lawrence Academy, Groton ; and, after 
leaving school, he entered the shipping com- 
mission house of N. F. Cunningham & Co., 
on India Wharf, Boston. He was next with 
the American Powder Company and later at 
Syracuse, N.Y. ; and at the end of that time 
he returned to Massachusetts, and bought a 
patent-right for roofing. For thirty years he 
was in the real estate and insurance business, 
being formerly connected with Mr. Towne. 
Besides this, Mr. Sawyer was for some time 
interested in the Companion Sewing Machine 
Company, and held in the company the office 
of treasurer. He has also been a director in 
the Union Hall Association, and closely con- 
nected with various Masonic bodies. 

In politics Mr. Sawyer is a warm Republi- 
can, and is ever ready to forward the prin- 
ciples of his party by personal effort. In 
1864 and 1865 he was a member of the Com- 
mon Council, and brought to bear upon all 
questions coming before him officially the 
same sound judgment and keen discrimination 
that have made successful his career as a busi- 
ness man. Early during the war of the Re- 
bellion he raised a company at Cambridge, 
afterward Company F of the Sixth Massachu- 
setts Regiment, and was commissioned Cap- 
tain by Governor Andrew on September 6, 
1862. This regiment served in the Army of 
the James, and he was with his command at 
Suffolk, Norfolk, and at the siege of Suffolk, 
Va. At the battle of Deserted House, where 
General Roger A. Pryor was defeated, five 
men around Captain Sawyer were shot, but he 
was uninjured. He is Past Commander of 
John A. Logan Post, No. 186, G. A. R., 
and takes a deep interest in all the meetings 
and reunions of veterans. 

Mr. Sawyer married a daughter of Levi 
Pratt, of Fitchburg, a Captain of militia, who 
was a prominent business man of that city and 
one of the first promoters with Alvah Crocker 
and others of the Fitchburg Railroad. Mr. 
and Mrs. Sawyer have three daughters living, 
all of whom are married. Their son was 
killed by being thrown from a horse. Mr. 
Sawyer is a director in the Middlesex Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, of Concord, Mass. ; 



a member of the well-known Colonial Club; 
Past Master of Mizpah Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
and a K. of H. of twenty years' standing. 
As a member of the Unitarian Society he is 
a generous contributor to its many benevo- 
lences and a supporter of its varied activities. 



(^JVLBERT C. ALDRICH, M.D., of 262 
tjj School Street, Somerville, Mass., was 
yj^V born in Lisbon, N.H., August 27, 

^^-' 1857, son of Simon and Martha 
(Carleton) Aldrich. Several generations of 
his paternal ancestors in direct line lived in 
Rhode Island. His grandfather, Jethro C. 
Aldrich, went from that State to New Hamp- 
shire, and, settling in the forest, cleared a 
farm, upon which he resided for the rest of 
his life. He died at the age of eighty-seven 
years. He was twice married, and Simon 
was the only child of his second union. 

Simon Aldrich, Dr. Aldrich's father, was 
born at Lisbon, N.H., about the year 1820, 
and in early manhood he purchased a farm in 
that town. Some time later he sold his prop- 
erty, and went to Manchester, where he was 
on the police force a number of years. He 
afterward resumed farming in Lisbon. In 
i860 he joined the Lowell police force, upon 
which he served two years, and then entered 
the government service at the Charlestown 
navy-yard. In 1865 he was appointed to a 
position in the appraiser's department of the 
Boston custom-house, remaining there until 
1886, when he resigned. He is now living 
in retirement in Somerville, where he has 
resided since 1879. Martha, his wife, was 
born in Franconia, N.H., daughter of Edward 
Carleton, a prosperous farmer of that town. 
She became the mother of three children, 
namely: George; Josephine E., wife of C. W. 
Hale, of Somerville; and Albert C, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Mrs. Martha C. Aldrich 
died fn 1880. She was a Congregationalist, 
and the Doctor's father is a member of that 
church. 

Albert C. Aldrich acquired his knowledge 
of the elementary branches of study at public 
and private schools in New Hampshire, ad- 
vanced by attending the grammar and high 
schools of Charlestown, Mass., and, entering 




LOWELL CLARK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Harvard University in 1875, received the de- 
gree of Baciielor of Arts as a member of the 
class of 1879. His professional studies were 
pursued at the Harvard Medical School, where 
he was graduated in 1883. After spending 
eighteen months at the Rhode Island Hospi- 
tal, and then practising a few months in St. 
Johnsbury, Vt., and at Attleboro, Mass., he 
located himself permanently in Somerville in 
November, 1885. As a physician he ranks 
among the most able and scientific practi- 
tioners in this city; and, as he is constantly 
in touch with advanced ideas, he avails him- 
self of every new and approved method in the 
treatment of disease. 

In 1888 Dr. Aldrich was united in marriage 
with Julia Ross, of St. Johnsbury, daughter of 
the Hon. Jonathan Ross, Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of the State of Vermont. 
Mrs. Aldrich is the mother of two children — 
Thomas R. and Martha. 

Dr. Aldrich iS a member of the Somerville 
Medical Society, and for two years was As- 
sistant Surgeon of the Eighth Regiment, 
M. V. M. He is connected with Soley 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Menotomy Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of Arlington ; the 
Charlestown Artillery; the Central Club of 
Somerville; and the University Club of Bos- 
ton. Mrs. Aldrich attends the Congrega- 
tional church. 



)OVVELL CLARK, a retired merchant 
of Waltham, was born in this city, 
April 18, 1 8 19, son of Jonas and 
Alice (Wellington) Clark. The 
first ancestor of the family in America was 
Hugh Clark, who settled in Watertown. The 
line of descent continues through his son, 
John Clark, first, and John Clark, second, to 
John Clark, third, the great-grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, who was a Captain 
in the militia. John Clark, fourth, grand- 
father of Lowell Clark, settled in Waltham, 
and became a prosperous farmer. He resided 
upon the land where the Central House now 
stands. He was a prominent man in his day, 
and held various public ofifices; and he- was 
Deacon of the First Parish Church for many 
years. He reared a large family of children. 



Jonas Clark was in his early career a hatter 
by trade, but later became a farmer. He was 
prominent in public affairs, serving as Select- 
man for a number of years, as Assessor, and 
as Representative to the legislature for sev- 
eral terms. He died at the age of ninety 
years. He was the father of ten children, of 
whom Lowell, the subject of this sketch, was 
the eighth-born. Two of his children died at 
the age of about twenty-one, and one of these 
graduated at Harvard University. 

Lowell Clark began his education in the 
common schools, and subsequently attended 
Waltham. Academy. At the age of sixteen he 
entered the dry-goods store of Jesse Sanger as 
clerk, and continued in that capacity with 
Mr. Sanger and his successor, Mr. Welling- 
ton, and others, for about ten years. He then 
formed a partnership with Phineas Upham, 
under the firm name of Upham & Clark, and 
carried on the dry-goods business successfully 
for several years. He later became associated 
with Francis Maynard and Warren F. Emer- 
son, under the firm name of Clark, Maynard 
& Co., and continued in business until 1892, 
when he sold out, and has since lived in re- 
tirement. He has been a director of the Wal- 
tham Gas Light Company for seven years 
and its president since 1887, and he has been 
a director of the Waltham Screw Company 
since its organization. 

In politics originally a Whig, Mr. Clark 
joined the Republican party at its formation. 
He cast his first Presidential vote for William 
Henry Harrison in 1840. He is a member 
of the Unitarian church. 

During the fifty-five years of his business 
career in Waltham, Mr. Clark maintained a 
reputation for honesty and integrity that 
gained the confidence of his customers and 
made his credit of the best with the wholesale 
dealers. He is now one of thg most respected 
among the retired business men of Waltham. 



^CrJ)/lLLIAM 
XVsV banker 
*^ »^ ins: at 



LLIAM C. CRAIG, a well-known 
banker and broker of Boston, resid- 
West Medford, was born in 
Fall River, Mass., December 25, 1841, son of 
Samuel C. and Sarah L. Craig. He is of 



76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Scottish descent, and his paternal ancestors 
were related to Sir Walter Scott. His father, 
who was a mason and builder and also a 
farmer, removed from Fall River to Prince 
Edward Island, where he became prominent 
in public affairs. He was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and in religion a strict 
Presbyterian. Both parents died many years 
ago. 

William C. Craig attended the common 
schools of Prince Edward Island in his early 
years, and, coming to Boston at the age of 
twelve, he completed his education at an even- 
ing school and at French's Private School. 
When a mere boy he entered the office of 
Gleasoii's Pictorial, and, working his way 
forward to a responsible position, remained 
with that concern until enlisting in the 
Twenty-second Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers. He was slightly wounded at the 
battle of Antietam, and in the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg he received a serious gunshot 
wound, which confined him to the hospital for 
seventy days. After his discharge from the 
army he returned to the Gleason Publishing 
House, where he remained until 1870, when 
he became connected with the J. C. Davis 
Company, bankers, at 12 School Street, Bos- 
ton, and has since continued in that business. 

In 1870 Mr. Craig married Isabel Smith, 
daughter of Deacon H. A. Smith, of Medford, 
and, taking up his residence in the town, be- 
came identified with local public affairs. In 
State and national politics he vigorously sup- 
ports the Republican party, but in local poli- 
tics he is independent, preferring to vote for 
the candidates whom he most approves. For 
five years he served as a Selectman of the 
town, being a member of the last board pre- 
vious to the incorporation of Medford as a 
city, and he has since served as Overseer of 
the Poor. He assisted in organizing the Old 
Village Improvement Association, and was its 
president for seven consecutive years. Soon 
after settling here he was appointed upon a 
committee to erect a Congregational church in 
West Medford, which was then without a 
place of worship; and since the completion 
of the building he has been a regular at- 
tendant. 

Mr. Craig is connected with Mount Hermon 



Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Mount Vernon Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. ; is a comrade of G. C. Lawrence 
Post, No. 66, G. A. R. ; was Treasurer for 
seven years of Mystic Lodge, No. 883, 
Knights of Honor; and is also a member of 
the Order of the Golden Cross. His business 
success was gained through his ability and 
perseverance, and his high standing in the 
community is the result of his true worth as 
a citizen and neighbor. 



(sTlTLBION 

fc^ Major-g 
yJt\^ army. 



PARRIS HOWE, Brevet 
general in the United States 



was born in Standish, Cum- 
berland County, Me., March 25, 
1 81 8. He was the seventh and youngest child 
of Dr. Ebenezer Howe, who was born in Mas- 
sachusetts, and of Catherine Spring, his wife, 
who came from Conway, N.H. 

In 1837 he entered the United States Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point, and graduated 
in the first section of his class in 1841. He 
was then commissioned Second Lieutenant in 
the Fourth United States Artillery, and, 
owing to the disturbances on the Canadian 
frontier, was ordered to Fort Gratiot, Michi- 
gan, and thence to Sackett's Harbor. In the 
summer of 1843, while stationed at Fort 
Severn, Maryland, he was appointed an assist- 
ant in the mathematical department at West 
Point, remaining at the academy until the 
breaking out of the Mexican War, when he 
applied to be relieved in order to join his regi- 
ment. His application being granted, he was 
promoted on June 18, 1846, to a First Lieu- 
tenant, made Adjutant of his regiment on Oc- 
tober I, which position he held until March 2, 
1855; and early in March, 1847, he landed 
with General Scott's army at Vera Cruz. He 
was engaged in the capture of that city, in the 
battle of Cerro Gordo, brevetted Captain "for 
gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles 
of Contreras and Churubusco," in action at 
the battle of Molino del Rey, in the storming 
of Chapultepec, and finally in the capture of 
the City of Mexico. 

Returning with the Fourth Artillery to 
Fortress Monroe, Virginia, he was soon 
ordered to Florida, with station at Pensacola 
and Fort Brooke. From 1850-55 he was in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



garrison at Forts Columbus and Hamilton, 
then on duty in New York City, and later in 
Baltimore. On March 2, 1855, he was pro- 
moted to a Captain, and was ordered on 
frontier duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. He 
took part in the expedition against the Sioux 
Indians, being engaged in the battle of Blue 
Water, September 3, 1855. The following 
winter was spent at Fort Laramie, Dak., from 
. which he was sent to Fort Kearney, Neb., and 
from the latter fort was ordered to Lecompton 
to aid in quelling the Kansas disturbances, 
caused by the struggle between the free set- 
tlers and the proslavery party. During the 
years 1859 and i860 he was again stationed at 
Fortress Monroe in connection with the Ar- 
tillery School of Practice. 

On February 17, 1859, ^^ ^^^ married in 
the city of New York to Miss Elizabeth Law 
Mehaffey, daughter of Andrew Mehaffey, 
Esq., who came from Marietta, Pa., and Eliz- 
abeth McPherson, his wife, of Gettysburg, Pa. 

When, in the fall of 1859, John Brown's 
raid was made on Harper's Ferry, General 
Howe was sent with his company to the scene 
of the disturbances, and there remained until 
peace was again restored. Returning to 
Fortress Monroe, he was shortly afterward 
ordered again on frontier duty, with his sta- 
tion at Fort Randall, Dak., but left there in 
April, 1861, on the breaking out of the Civil 
War. With his battery of light artillery, he 
reported in June following to General Mc- 
Clellan in West Virginia, and was engaged in 
the actions of Rich Mountain, Elk Water, and 
Greenbrier. Leaving West Virginia in De- 
cember, he served in the defences of Washing- 
ton until March, 1862, when he was placed in 
command of a brigade of light artillery in 
General Couch's (first) division of the Fourth 
Corps, commanded by General Keyes, and 
moved with the Army of the Potomac to the 
Peninsula. 

During this campaign he was engaged in 
the siege of Yorktown, in the action at Lee's 
Mill, in the battles of Williamsburg and Fair 
Oaks, and on the nth of June following was 
promoted to the rank of Brigadier-general, 
United States Volunteers. On June 25 he 
was engaged in the action of Mechanicsville 
and in the operation immediately following 



the seven days' "change of base" to the 
James River. 

In the battle of Malvern Hill, General 
Howe's brigade formed the right of General 
Couch's division, which was stationed midway 
up the hill. Anderson's vigorous attack on 
the right wing was successfully repulsed; 
while the later assaults on the heights by the 
combined forces of Magruder, Huger, and 
D. H. Hill, constituting the whole of the 
Confederate right wing, proved equally disas- 
trous to the assailants. For "gallant and 
meritorious service" in this battle he was 
awarded a brevet commission of Major in the 
regular army. 

During the Northern Virginia and Mary- 
land campaign, from August to November, 

1862, General Howe was engaged in the battle 
of Manassas, again at Crampton's Gap, in the 
battle of South Mountain, and on September 
17 in the battle of Antietam. Under the re- 
organization of the Army of the Potomac after 
this battle. General Howe was placed in com- 
mand of the Second Division of the Sixth 
Corps. 

After the march to Falmouth, reached on 
November 19, 1862, began the campaign on 
the Rappahannock, opening on December 13 
with the battle of Fredericksburg. Here 
General Howe's division, forming the left 
wing of the Sixth Corps, was posted in front 
of the heights of Bernard's cabin and the ad- 
joining woods, which were occupied by 
Hood's right, and the left of A. P. Hill. 
Upon the Second Division of the Sixth Corps 
a vigorous attack was made, but so determined 
was the resistance that it was repulsed with 
heavy losses, one regiment (the Fifty-seventh 
North Carolina) of Law's brigade losing as 
many as two hundred and twenty-four men. 

During the battle of Chancellorsville which 
followed. Genera] Sedgwick, then in command 
of the Sixth Corps, ordered the Second and 
Third Divisions, comm.anded respectively by 
Generals Howe and Newton, to assault 
Marye's Heights. The ascent was begun at 
eleven o'clock on Sunday morning, May 3, 

1863. "At half -past eleven," says the Comte 
de Paris (vol. iii. p. 97), "Sedgwick was in 
possession of the famous heights which for 
the last three months the two armies had 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



been accustomed to look upon as impregnable. 
The assault had cost him about one thousand 
men."' In spite of the severity of this as- 
sault, the two divisions which had success- 
fully made it were again engaged that same 
afternoon in the battle of Salem Heights, 
which acquired its greatest force on the after- 
noon of the day following. General Howe's 
division, forming the left wing of the army, 
and numbering only six thousand men, de- 
fended a front of more than two miles in 
extent, from Taylor's Mill to the Guest dwell- 
ing. The attack upon it was made by three 
strong divisions (McClow's, Anderson's, and 
Early's), directed by General Lee himself, 
with the view to cut the communication of 
the Sixth Corps with its river crossing. The 
attack was successfully repulsed without the 
loss of a gun or prisoner; but this action and 
the less important one on the preceding after- 
noon cost General Howe's division one thou- 
sand, five hundred and fifteen men. For "gal- 
lant and meritorious services in action at 
Salem Heights, Va. ," he was brevetted a Lieu- 
tenant Colonel in the regular army. 

The Pennsylvania campaign, "which was to 
decide the future of America," was begun on 
June 3, 1863, when Generals Lee and Hooker 
put their armies in motion. General Hooker, 
in order to make a reconnoissance on the right 
bank of the Rappahannock, ordered General 
Howe's division to take the lead in crossing 
the pontoons at Franklin's Crossing, imme- 
diately beyond which the Confederates were in- 
trenched in their rifle pits. Owing to their 
exposure to the rebel sharpshooter while mak- 
ing the passage, many of the Union troops 
lost their lives; but the opposite shore was 
finally reached, and the Confederates driven 
from their rifle pits. For his services in this 
action General Hooker, in a letter to the 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, dated December 28, 
1866, recommended "that Brigadier-general 
Howe (of the artillery) be brevetted a Major- 
general for skilful and meritorious services, 
to date from June 3, 1863." 

It was not until about ten o'clock on the 
night of July i that the Sixth Corps, stationed 
at Manchester, heard of the first day's battle 
at Gettysburg and of the death of General 
Reynolds. At one o'clock in the morning 



the corps started, and after a forced march of 
thirty-five miles reached the field of Gettys- 
burg in the early part of the afternoon, and 
took up its position in the rear of Round Top. 

In his official report General Howe says: 
"During the battles of July 2 and 3 the 
Third Brigade was ordered to take position on 
the extreme right flank of the army, and the 
portion of the division in support of the Fifth 
Corps was ordered, with two batteries, to take 
position on the extreme left, to hold the left 
flank of the army. This position the division 
held until the close of the action and until 
the morning of July 5." Then began the pur- 
suit of Lee's army to Warrenton, followed by 
the campaign on the Rapidan, during which 
General Howe was brevetted Colonel in the 
regular army for "gallant and meritorious ser- 
vices in the battles of Rappahannock Station, 
Virginia." 

During the latter part of November he was 
engaged in the Mine Run operations, and was 
afterward placed in command of the Artillery 
Depot and in charge of the office of Inspector 
of Artillery at Washington, in which position 
he served from March 2, 1864, to August 2, 
1866. 

During the summer of 1864 General Howe 
was engaged in placing Harper's Ferry in a 
state of defence. On March 13 following he 
was brevetted Major-general in the regular 
army for "gallant and meritorious services dur- 
ing the Rebellion." 

When President Lincoln was assassinated. 
Genera] Howe was selected as one of the 
twelve general officers of the army and navy to 
act as a guard of honor, to escort the remains 
from Washington to Springfield; and oh his 
return he was appointed one of the Board of 
Commissioners who tried the conspirators 
who took part with Wilkes Booth in the at- 
tempt made upon the lives of the members of 
the Cabinet and in the killing of Lincoln. 

On July 13, 1865, General Howe was bre- 
vetted Major-general of volunteers for "faith- 
ful and meritorious services during the Re- 
bellion," and on January 15, 1866, while 
serving as a member of the Artillery Board, 
he was honorably mustered out of volunteer 
service. While on the Artillery Board he was 
appointed, with General Hardie, inspector of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



all the arms, ammunition, and military stores 
in the United States forts and arsenals, his 
duties in the office extending from August 2, 
1866, to August 20, 1867. Subsequently he 
was on duty in the Bureau of Refugees, Freed- 
men, and Abandoned Lands, when in June, 
1868, with the rank of Major in the Fourth 
Artillery, he was placed in command of Fort 
Washington, Maryland. After remaining in 
garrison duty for several years at this post, he 
was then placed in charge of the government 
disbursing office at Louisville, Ky. After 
serving again on garrison duty, beginning in 
1877 at Presidio, Cal., then at Alcatraz 
Island, California, and at Fort McHenry, 
Maryland, he was promoted on April 19, 
1S82, to be Colonel of his old regiment, the 
Fourth Artillery, with his headquarters at 
Fort Adams at Newport, R. L 

In the summer of 1882, he was retired from 
active service by operation of law, and, after 
spending a year at Newport, took up his resi- 
dence permanently at Cambridge, Mass, 

He was a member of the Massachusetts 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion, and up to 
the time of his death Vice-Commander of the 
Massachusetts Commandery of the Military 
Order of Foreign Wars. He died at his home 
in Cambridge on Monday, January 25, 1897. 



KREDERIC A. FLINT, a prominent 
merchant of Woburn and a thirty-third 
degree Mason, was born in this city. 
May 25, 1837, son of Frederic and Susan 
(Richardson) Flint. His first American an- 
cestor on the paternal side was Thomas Flint, 
an early settler in Salem village, Mass. ; and 
the second was Sergeant George Flint, who 
married Elizabeth Putnam, and settled at 
Reading, his home being in what is now 
North Reading. 

Frederic Flint, son of Amos and sixth in 
descent from Thomas, through his son George, 
was born in Reading, Mass., September 5, 
1807. He came to Woburn soon after the 
year 1820, and engaged in the manufacturing 
of shoes. He enjoyed a prosperous business 
career, and resided here until his death. 
Susan Richardson, whom he married in Wo- 
burn, was a daughter of Calvin and Sarah 



(Steel) Richardson. She became the mother 
of four children, namely: Susan, wife of 
B. F. Smith, of Woburn; Frederic A., the 
subject of this sketch; John R., who married 
Helen A. Furlong, and is now living here 
in retirement; and Franklin Flint, a resi- 
dent of this city, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of the late Edgar Marchant, formerly 
editor of the Woburn Journal. Mr. Flint's 
parents united with the Congregational church 
in 1827. 

Frederic A. Flint was educated in the 
schools of Woburn, and after completing his 
studies he entered the employ of Hall & 
Fowle, of Boston, commission merchants in 
cotton and woollen goods and manufacturers' 
agents, and was later sent out to buy wool in 
the Western markets. He succeeded in pur- 
chasing a large amount at favorable prices, but 
the financial panic of 1857 caused the suspen- 
sion of his firm. After working a short time 
as a book-keeper for E. B. Paine, he accom- 
panied S. A. Fowle to Charlottetown, P.E.I., 
and remained in business there until i860. 
Returning to Massachusetts, he travelled for 
a Boston firm until a flattering offer from J. S. 
Carvell led him to go back to Prince Edward 
Island and engage in the commission and 
shipping business. His second sojourn there 
extended through a period of five years, dur- 
ing which time he was appointed by Secre- 
tary Seward Vice-Consul at Charlottetown; 
and after the death of Consul Jay H. Sherman 
he was Acting Consul. After the abrogation 
of the reciprocity treaty he returned to Wo- 
burn. He first went in with Mr. Gage, the 
merchant tailor, on May i, 1866; and in Oc- 
tober, 1866, he formed a partnership with him 
under the firm name of G. R. Gage & Co. 
This firm existed until February, 1891, when 
Mr. Gage retired. Mr. Flint has since con- 
ducted the merchant tailoring business in the 
Bank Block on Main Street, retaining the old 
firm name. He served as one of the Town 
Auditors for several years, was a director and 
the second president of the Woburn Board of 
Trade, and a director of the Agricultural and 
Mechanics' Association. In politics he is a 
Republican. Mr. Flint has reached the high- 
est rank in the Masonic fraternity, having 
obtained the thirty-third degree, Ancient 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and Accepted Scottish Rite, and is a member 
of Mount Horeb Lodge, Woburn Royal Arch 
Chapter, and Hugh de Payens Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Melrose. 



(six UGUSTUS RAMSAY BAYLEY, one 

fe^ of the oldest druggists in Cambridge, 
Jj\\ was born in Wentworth, N.H., May 
— ' 23, 1S18, son of Simon and Selina 
(Ramsay) Bayley. He is a lineal descendant 
in the seventh generation of Richard Bayley, 
who came to Massachusetts with Richard 
Dummer in the ship "Bevis" in 1638, and 
settled at Rowley, where his brother James 
was already a resident. They were probably 
from Hampshire, England. 

Richard Bayley, the immigrant, married 
Ednah Halstead, and had one son, Joseph by 
name, who married Abigail Trumbull, and 
lived in Bradford, Mass. Joseph Bayley's 
second child and eldest son, named for his 
grandfather Richard, married in 1706 Joanna 
Webster, and was the father of a third Rich- 
ard, born in 1717, representative of the fourth 
generation in this line. He married, in 
1741, Rachel Page, lived for a time in Haver- 
hill, Mass., and then- removed to Hopkinton, 
N.H. His son, Richard, fourth, born in 
1746 at Bradford, Mass., married, in 1769, 
Mehitable Emerson, removed in 1777 from 
West Haverhill, Mass., to Plymouth, N.H., 
and thence in 1806 to Berlin, Vt., where he 
died in 1829. 

Simon Bayley, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born about 1783 at Plymouth, 
N.H., seventh child and fourth son of Rich- 
ard and Mehitable (Emerson) Bayley. He 
married in 1805 Selina Ramsay, daughter of 
James Ramsay, a Revolutionary soldier who 
spent the greater part of his life on a farm at 
Rumney, N.H. 

For some years Simon Bayley kept Page's 
Tavern in Wentworth, N.H., and he later be- 
came proprietor of Llotel Riley in Boston, 
where he died at the age of thirty-nine years. 
He was the father of six children, of whom 
Augustus R. , the subject of this sketch, is 
the only one living. 

Augustus Ramsay Bayley was educated in 
Boston and Cambridge, and learned the busi- 



ness of an apothecary with A. H. Ramsay, 
Cambridge, remaining in his store for fifteen 
years, and then established himself in busi- 
ness. He has since been prominent among 
the apothecaries of this city, and has occupied 
his present store for the past fifty-two years. 

Mr. Bayley is connected with Mizpah 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Cambridge Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; and Boston Command- 
ery, Knights Templar. He is also a member 
of the Union Club, Cambridge, and the New 
England Historical and Genealogical Society, 
and was formerly vice-president of the Inter- 
national Pharmaceutical Association. 

On November 30, 1847, ^^- Bayley was 
married to Sarah Wells, daughter of Francis 
Wells, a sea captain of Cape Cod. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bayley are the parents of two children, 
namely: Francis A., of South Framingham, 
Mass., a civil engineer, employed by the Met- 
ropolitan Water Company; and Helen L., who 
is at home. 



(©Yy-LLAN MOTT RING, M.D., founder 
fcjj and proprietor of the well-known 
/J|j,\ sanatorium for the treatment of 
' nervous diseases at Arlington, 
Mass., is a native of St. John, N.B., where 
his ancestors had their home for two genera- 
tions, but on the paternal side is sprung from 
Massachusetts and Plymouth Colonial stock. 
He is a lineal descendant of Andrew Ring, 
who with his widowed mother, Mary Ring, 
arrived at Plymouth, Mass., in 1626, and later 
was one of the founders of the town of Kings- 
ton, Plymouth County. Andrew Ring mar- 
ried Deborah, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, 
of honored memory as a "Mayflower" Pilgrim. 
Dr. Ring's great-grandparents were Zebe- 
dee and Hannah (Esterbrook) Ring, both 
natives of the old Bay State, the former born 
in Newburyport. Zebedee Ring, with his 
brother Levi, received from King George III. 
a large grant of land in New Brunswick, near 
what is now Carleton, and, settling there 
prior to the American Revolution, made his 
home in New Brunswick for the rest of his 
life. Jacob Ring, the Doctor's grandfather, 
resided in Fredericton, N.B., and, as he was 
possessed of considerable means, he never en- 




AUGUSTUS R. BAYLEY. 



BIOGRAPHrtAL REVIEW 



gaged in active business pursuits. He mar- 
ried Hannah Hartt, daughter of the Rev. 
Samuel Hartt, and was the father of four chil- 
dren, Zebedee, named for his grandfather, 
being the eldest son. None are now living. 
Jacob Ring died at the age of thirty-six, and 
his wife died at twenty-seven. They were 
members of the Baptist church. 

Zebedee Ring, second of the name. Dr. 
Ring's father, was born in Fredericton, Jan- 
uary 12, 1817. Left an orphan at the age of 
twelve years, he early in life developed busi- 
ness ability of a high order. His ambition 
to advance naturally drew him to the city of 
-St. John, the commercial centre of the prov- 
ince, and he became an extensive ship-owner. 
Later he engaged in banking, and for many 
years was connected with the Maritime Bank 
of St. John. His unfailing regularity and 
sterling integrity in all his business opera- 
tions were the means of his accumulating a 
large amount of property, and he was favor- 
ably known and highly respected throughout 
the maritime provinces and in England. His 
wife, Mary Hartt, whom he married June 2, 
1840, was born in St. John, N.B., January 25, 
1820, daughter of John Hartt, of that prov- 
ince. She became the mother of two sons 
and two daughters, namely: George F., born 
May 2, 1841; Allan M., born October 27, 
1844, the subject of this sketch; Helen 
Louise, born September 13, 1847; and Mary, 
born August i, 1855. George F. Ring mar- 
ried Ada Jane Hammond, of St. John, N.B., 
daughter of William Hammond, a native of 
Wakefield, England, who was a leading mer- 
chant of St. John. Their children are: Her- 
bert H., Alice M., Eugene D., Grace, Ada 
J., and George F., Jr. Helen Louise is the 
wife of Harry A. Beddome, manager of the 
London, Ont., branch of the Bank of Mon- 
treal, and has two children — Mary and Geral- 
dine. Mary is now the widow of John C. 
Allison, and has no children. Zebedee Ring 
died in Liverpool, England, in January, 1878, 
at the age of sixty- one, survived by his wife, 
who lived to be seventy-three years old. 
They were Baptists in their religious views. 

Allan Mott Ring acquired his early educa- 
tion in the schools of St. John, passing from 
the grammar school to the high, and then went 



to Edinburgh, Scotland, where he spent some 
time, and was graduated at the high school in 
1864. His medical studies were pursued for 
a year at the University of Edinburgh, and 
were continued at the University of the City 
of New York, where he received his diploma 
in 1867. Settling in his native city, he 
practised there until i88r, when he founded 
the sanatorium in Arlington for the treat- 
ment of nervous diseases. In the years that 
have passed since that date he has not only 
brought this now well-known institution up 
to a high standard of excellence, but has ac- 
quired an enviable reputation in Boston and 
vicinity as a specialist. His high character 
and his usefulness to the public have gained 
the respect and appreciation of the commu- 
nity, which is perfectly familiar with his pro- 
fessional ability and worth. 

On September 4, 1867, Dr. Ring was 
united in marriage with Wilhemina F. Ham- 
mond, daughter of William Hammond and a 
sister of his brother's wife. Mrs. Ring is 
the mother of three children, namely: Edith 
H., born May 20, 1868; Arthur Hal Ian, born 
November 17, 1874; and Harold Endicott, 
born January 27, 1880. Arthur Hallan Ring 
was graduated at the Boston University Medi- 
cal School in the class of 1897, and is now 
practising with his father at the sanatorium. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ring are Episcopalians in re- 
ligious faith and affiliation. He is a member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and in poli- 
tics he acts with the Republican party. 



,LARENCE F. FRENCH, a success- 
ful lawyer of Waltham, Mass., the 
son of Allen D. and Lizzie M. 
(Yates) French, was born August 
20, 1864, in Belfast, Me. He belongs, how- 
ever, to an old Middlesex County family. A 
remote ancestor, William French, a native of 
Halstead, England, crossed the Atlantic in 
company with the Rev. Thomas Shepard in 
1635, and for a number of years made his 
home in Cambridge, Mass. About the year 
1652 he removed to Billerica, where he be- 
came a prominent citizen and was the first 
Deputy sent by that town to the General 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Court, taking his seat in 1663. Later mem- 
bers of the French family resided in the same 
place; but in 1790 one of them, Ebenezer, 
grandfather of Allen D. French, went to 
Lincolnville, Me., as a pioneer settler. The 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch was 
a citizen of Lincolnville, and was during the 
greater part of his active life engaged as a 
blacksmith and ship-builder, but in his latter 
years he carried on blacksmithing only. His 
wife's name was Rogers, and by her he had 
three children. 

The second of the three was Allen D., the 
father named above, who is the subject of 
another sketch. He served in the Civil War 
in the First Maine Cavalry, and had some 
rather stirring experiences, notably an im- 
prisonment of several months at Belle Island 
with his younger brother. For several years 
he was a resident of Belfast, and while there 
he served as Alderman. He now lives in 
Waltham. He turned his attention to real 
estate after his removal, and has been for the 
last ten years a well-known business man of 
this city. He is interested in Masonic 
affairs, and is an active Knight Templar. 
His wife, who was born in North Berwick, 
Me., is a daughter of the Rev. Freeman 
Yates, a Methodist Episcopal minister. She 
is said to be a descendant of Governor Edward 
Winslow, of Plymouth Colony. 

Clarence F. French is the eldest of four 
children. He was educated in the public 
schools of Belfast, Me., and at Tufts College, 
Medford, Mass., where he took his degree in 
1889. He commenced the study of law while 
in college, and after his graduation he contin- 
ued it in the office of the Hon. George L. 
Mayberry, and also in the Harvard Law 
School. He was admitted to the Middlesex 
County bar in 1889, and in the spring of the 
following year he opened an oiifice in 
Waltham. He practises in all the State 
courts. For two years, 1893-94, he was one 
of the Aldermen of the city. He has been 
attorney for the Waltham Co-operative Bank 
since 1891, succeeding Thomas Curley. He 
is quite largely identified with fraternal 
organizations, being a member of Isaac Parker 
Lodge, F. & A. M., in which he is Senior 
Steward ; of the Sons of Veterans ; of the 



A. O. U. W. ; and of the Citizens' Club, of 
which latter body he has been secretary and 
treasurer for several years. He also was at 
one time a member of the Philedian Associa- 
tion. He belongs to the Congregational 
Church of Waltham, and was for two or three 
years clerk of the parish. 

Mr. French married Alice L. Bates, a 
daughter of Joseph C. Bates, of Waltham. 
They have four children. 






LBERT AVER, Selectman, Assessor, 
and Town Clerk of Winchester, was 
born in Charlestown, Mass., Janu- 
ary 30, 1825, son of Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth (Fosdick) Ayer. He is a descend- 
ant in the eighth generation of John Ayer, 
who emigrated from England in 1637, at first 
took up his abode in Salisbury, Mass., and in 
1645 settled in Haverhill as a pioneer. 

Robert Ayer, second son of John, was on 
July 27, 1654, married to Elizabeth Palmer. 
Samuel Ayer, eldest son of Robert, wedded 
Mary Johnson, who bore him ten children, the 
third of whom was James, the next in this 
line. James Ayer married Mary White, and 
had a family of eleven children. Their sec- 
ond son was named John, and the maiden 
name of his wife was Elizabeth Hale. Of 
the eight children born to this couple the 
fourth was Obadiah, Mr. Albert Ayer's grand- 
father. Obadiah Ayer married Elizabeth 
Whittier; and their fifth child, Nathaniel, 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Haverhill, and later was a resident of 
Charlestown, where he married. His wife 
was Elizabeth Fosdick. They had ten chil- 
dren, and Albert, the subject of this sketch, 
was the seventh -born. 

Albert Ayer was educated in the public 
schools of Charlestown, and in his youth 
began to learn the art of manufacturing britan- 
nia ware in Maiden. After attaining his ma- 
jority he became a clerk in the office of the 
Lowell Railroad in Boston, a position he oc- 
cupied for thirteen years. He was subse- 
quently a clerk in a grain elevator for a time, 
and was employed in a similar capacity by R. 
Sherburne, a window-glass manufacturer. He 
took up his residence in Winchester in 1855, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and since 1861 has served as an Assessor. 
He has been a member of the Board of Select- 
men since 1875, was elected Town Clerk in 
1890, and from 1890 to 1896 he was Water 
Registrar. 

Mr. Ayer married Caroline Stiles, who is 
descended from Revolutionary stock, her ma- 
ternal grandfather, Reuben Baker, having 
served as a soldier in the war for indepen- 
dence. She has had five children, two of 
whom are living; namely, Albert Eugene and 
Fanny. Albert E. Ayer married Addie M. 
Whitney, and has six sons and one daughter. 
Fanny is the wife of George A. Weld, for 
twenty years shipping clerk for Bacheller 
Brothers and now a clerk at Tufts Soda 
Fountain Manufactory, Boston. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weld have two sons. 

Mr. Ayer is a member of the Legion of 
Honor. He is highly respected as a faithful 
public official, and his efforts in forwarding 
the interests of the community are heartily 
appreciated. He has served for many years 
as a Deacon of the Baptist church. 



m 



[LLIAM A. FRINK, a well-known 
and esteemed resident of West 
Somerville, Middlesex County, 
Mass., is a native of Sarnia, Ont., where he 
was born on January i, 1851, his parents 
being Ambrose and Emma (Major) Frink. 
His earlier ancestors on the paternal side 
were New England people. The first repre- 
sentative of the Frink family in America of 
whom we have positive information was John 
Frink, who settled at Stonington, Conn., as 
early as 1666. His children by his wife, 
Grace, were: Deborah, Samuel, John, and 
Thomas. They were born in Stonington. 
William A. Frink's great-grandfather Frink 
was born in Connecticut, and was a farmer. 
He was the father of Amos, who was born in 
Waterbury, Conn., but spent the greater part 
of his life in Rochester, N.Y., where he was 
engaged in ship-building. 

Ambrose Frink, above named, son of Amos, 
was a native of Rochester, N.Y. He removed 
to Sarnia, Ont., when a young man, and there 
followed the trade of ship-building, when not 
engaged as a sailor on the Great Lakes. His 



wife, Emma Major, whom he married in On- 
tario, was a daughter of James Major, of Lon- 
don, England. She became the mother of 
nine children, one of whom died in infancy. 
The living are: William A., the subject of 
this sketch; Charles A.; Emma A.; Fannie 
A.; Sarah A.; H. Albert; Hattie Eva; and 
Nellie Ada. Ambrose Frink died at fifty 
years of age. 

The boyhood of Mr. William A. Frink was 
spent in Sarnia, where he attended the com- 
mon schools. When but twelve years old he 
shipped as seaman on the Great Lakes, and 
for the fourteen succeeding years he was a 
sailor. At twenty-eight years of age he went 
to New York City, and secured employment 
in a confectionery manufacturing establish- 
ment, where he remained for two years. He 
then removed to Boston, and in that city was 
similarly engaged for a somewhat longer 
period. In 1885 he started in business for 
himself as a funeral director, and by subse- 
quent painstaking and diligent effort he suc- 
ceeded in gaining a foothold in his new voca- 
tion. In 1 89 1 he established himself in West 
Somerville at his present location, 17 Hol- 
land Street, where he has since built up a suc- 
cessful business. Fraternally, Mr. Frink is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and of the Knights and Ladies of 
Honor. He is an earnest worker in the Meth- 
odist church. 

Mr. Frink was married in 1871 to Emma 
Louisa, daughter of Jesse and Christiana 
Webb. One son, Charles A., has been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Frink, and he is associated 
in business with his father. Mr. Charles A. 
Frink married Jennie May McArthur, and has 
one son, William A., second. 



DWIN ROBBINS, a retired business 
man, who resides at a pleasant country- 
seat in Arlington, was born in this 
town, January 9, 1832, son of Nathan and 
Eliza E. (Parker) Robbins. His father was 
the eldest of six children born to Nathan Rob- 
bins, first, who emigrated from Scotland; and 
an extended account of the family genealogy 
may be found in a published work entitled the 
Robbins Memorial. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Nathan Bobbins, second, father of Edwin 
Robbins, was born in West Cambridge, now 
Arlington, in 1803. When a young man he 
found employment in Faneuil Hall Market, 
Boston, and subsequently engaged in the poul- 
try and game business for himself in that 
well-known market centre. For many years 
and until his retirement he conducted a large 
and very profitable business, and was widely 
known as an honorable, upright, and benevo- 
lent man. He was one of the organizers of 
the Faneuil Hall National Bank, of which he 
was chosen the president, and remained at its 
head for the rest of his life. Politically, he 
voted with the Democratic party, but took no 
active part in public affairs. In religious be- 
lief he was a Unitarian, but contributed gen- 
erously toward the support of any church in 
need of assistance. His wife, Eliza, was a 
daughter of Robert Parker, of Lexington. 
She became the mother of five children, two 
of whom are living; namely, Edwin and 
Alvin. The last named married Emma F. 
De Blois, who died leaving three children — 
Clinton, Clarence, and Amelia. Nathan Rob- 
bins died in 1888, aged eighty-five years, his 
wife having passed away in 1877, at the age 
of seventy. 

Edwin Robbins received his elementary ed- 
ucation in the schools of his native town, and 
subsequently pursued a four years' course at 
Gates Academy, Marlboro. At the age of 
seventeen he became connected with his 
father's business as a clerk, and, although he 
was later admitted to partnership, the busi- 
ness was conducted under the name of Nathan 
Robbins even after the elder man's retire- 
ment. Edwin Robbins kept the business up 
to the standard set by his father, and was a 
familiar figure in Faneuil Hall Market until 
1884, when he retired. Since 1879 he has 
resided on his handsome estate of twelve 
acres, situated on Eastern Avenue, Arling- 
ton, and busies himself by raising farm prod- 
ucts for his own use. 

In June, 1852, Mr. Robbins was united in 
marriage with Ellen S. Daniels, daughter of 
John P. Daniels, of West Cambridge. Mrs. 
Robbins is the mother of four children, as fol- 
lows: Frank, Henry P., Nellie, and Nathan. 
Frank married Cate Cavanaugh, of California, 



and has two children — Edwin and Josephine; 
Henry P. married Eva Hall, of Boston ; 
Nellie is the wife of J. H. Coleman, of New 
York; and Nathan married Louisa Reahan, of 
the same city. Politically, Mr. Robbins is a 
Democrat, and in his religious views he is 
liberal. 



/[JTeORGE H. HOWARD, a member of 
\ p I the well-known business firm of 
^— ^ W. L. Lockhart & Co., of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., was born in Cambridge, No- 
vember 13, 1838, son of Thomas and Hannah 
E. (Wright) Howard. The Howards from 
Hingham have lived in Cambridge for several 
generations. Ancestors of Mr. Howard on 
the maternal side fought in the Revolutionary 
War. His grandfather was one of the work- 
men on the ship "Constitution." 

Thomas Howard was a dealer in wood and 
coal. By his wife, Hannah, who was a native 
of Acton, Mass., near Concord, he had three 
children. 

George H., the second-born, was but eleven 
years old at the time of his father's death, in 
1849. His first paying employment was in a 
drug store in Boston, Mass. ; but he soon left 
Boston to go to Pepperell, this State, where 
he lived with his uncle, Joseph Wright, at- 
tending school and at the same time working 
on the farm. After leaving school he was 
employed in the New England Glass Works at 
Cambridge, and learned the trade of mould and 
pattern making. As an instance of his early 
struggles the following anecdote will illus- 
trate the energy and decision which has char- 
acterized his business career. A cotton-mill 
at Ipswich was in need of boys, and adver- 
tised, offering three dollars a week. In com- 
pany with the son of a neighbor he applied 
and obtained a situation; but, after working 
for some hours, desiring more explicit agree- 
ment, they went to the overseer, who, after 
some hedging, would allow them only one dol- 
lar and a half a week. This sum was a little 
under their limit; and, taking their trunk 
which they had brought, they started for 
home, carrying their luggage between them as 
far as Saugus, when a farmer, who overtook 
them on the road, good-naturedly took charge 




GEORGE H. HOWARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of it, and delivered it free of charge in Cam- 
bridge. 

Shortly after the breaking out of the Rebell- 
ion, Mr. Howard enlisted in Company A, 
Sixteenth Massachusetts Regiment, being 
mustered into service as Second Lieutenant, 
July 17, 1 86 1. He served under General 
Wool at Fortress Monroe, was afterward under 
the command of General McClellan, and in 
the fall of 1S61 was promoted to be First 
Lieutenant of Company C of Groton, and 
ordered to Baltimore to protect the passage of 
troops through that place. His regiment was 
then transferred to Fortress Monroe, under 
General Wool, where they did picket duty 
until April, 1862. While there he was a 
spectator of the famous battle between the 
"Merrimac " and "Monitor." From Fortress 
Monroe he was ordered to Norfolk, Va., and 
was afterward in the Army of the Potomac, 
and a participant of the battles of Seven 
Pines, and in all of the engagements of the 
army from that time until the second Bull 
Run, when he was obliged to return home. 

His elder brother was dying; and, his 
younger brother having enlisted in the ser- 
vice, it devolved upon him to resign his com- 
mand and take up the support of the family. 
He first took charge of the mould department 
of the glass works at Portland, Me., for four 
years, at the end of that time resigning his 
position to take charge of the moulding de- 
partment of the new glass works at Montreal. 
Having remained there a year and a half, he 
returned to Cambridge, and took a special 
course of instruction at Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College. He next went on the State 
force as Constable under Major Jones, and 
continued to serve the public in that capacity 
until the new law was enacted in 1871, when 
he entered the W. L. Lockhart's wholesale 
undertaking office as clerk and book-keeper. 
He was admitted to the firm January i, 1893, 
the business continuing under the original 
firm name of W. L. Lockhart & Co. 

Politically, Mr. Howard has always been 
affiliated with the Republican party, and has 
received many offices at the hands of his fel- 
low-citizens. He was a member of the Com- 
mon Council in Cambridge in 1873, 1874, 
1881, 1882, 1883, and 1884, being president 



of the board the last three years; was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Aldermen in Cambridge 
in 1875 and 1876; has been one of the Com- 
missioners of the Sinking Fund of Cambridge 
since 1887; and has been a member of the 
Water Board since 1888. He is a trustee of 
the Wilder Savings Bank, and was for some 
time a director of the East Cambridge Savings 
Bank. 

While a resident of the city of Portland, 
Mr. Howard became a member of the Portland 
Lodge, No. I, F. & A. M., the oldest lodge 
in that State, having been instituted about 
the year 1769. Upon removing to Cambridge 
in 1 87 1, he became a member of the Putnam 
Lodge of Cambridge, was made a member of 
the Royal Arch Chapter in 1882, and is a 
charter member of the Cambridge Command- 
ery, K. T. He is also associated with the 
New England Lodge, L O. O. F., No. 4; the 
Cambridge Club; and the P. Stearns Davis 
Encampment, G. A. R., Post No. 57. He 
was Commander of the post for six different 
terms, until he was obliged to refuse another 
election. He is a member of the K. of H. 
and the K. L. of H., and is a charter mem- 
ber of the New Elngland Order of Protection, 
in which he has held every chair, being 
at the present time Supreme Warden. The 
lodge started with a membership of fifteen 
persons. It now enrolls nearly twenty-two 
thousand members, and has paid out in pre- 
miums about one and one-half millions of dol- 
lars. William H. Martin, of Cambridge, the 
first Supreme Warden of the order, was suc- 
ceeded by the Hon. Samuel P. Tenney, of 
Chelsea, who held the office for a time, when 
he was succeeded by the Hon. John J. Whip- 
ple, ex-Mayor of Brockton. The order now 
includes three hundred lodges, of which more 
than twenty were added during the last fiscal 
year, under the administration of Mr. Howard, 
namely: in Maine, six; New Hampshire, 
one; Vermont, one; Massachusetts, nine; 
Connecticut, five. 

Mr. Howard is a Baptist in his religious 
faith, and was superintendent of the Sunday- 
school of the Second Baptist Church of Cam- 
bridge for twenty-five years. He resigned 
that office in 1S96, but has served on various 
committees of the society at different times. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He was a director of the Cambridge Young 
Men's Christian Association; and, much oc- 
cupied as his time always is, he is never too 
busy to find time to give to others. 

He married April 28, 1861, Lottie B. 
Wickens, of Barrington, N.S., their wedding 
taking place just previous to his enlistment. 
They have two children living: L. Eva, who 
resides at home; and Lillie B., who married 
H. W. Pierce, of Newton, member of the firm 
of Pierce &*" Pierce, of Boston, Mass. 



ARREN S. FROST, one of the 
leading agriculturists of Belmont, 
Mass., was born in that part of 
West Cambridge which is now Belmont, 
March 7, 1823, a son of Jonathan and Evelyn 
(Hull) Frost. His grandfather, John Frost, 
also a native of West Cambridge, was a 
soldier in the Continental army. He owned 
a large amount of real estate in Belmont, 
where he spent his life engaged in farming. 
He married Susanna Hill, and they had ten 
children, five girls and five boys, of whom 
Jonathan was the second son. A son of 
theirs was one of the first students at Andover 
Seminary, but died before graduating. John 
Frost died at the age of fifty-four years, and 
his wife at the age of forty-three. They were 
both members of the Congregational church at 
West Cambridge. Jonathan Frost was born 
in Belmont in December, 1788. By his wife, 
whose name in maidenhood was Evelyn Hull, 
he had nine children, seven of whom are now 
living, namely: Warren S., the subject of 
this sketch; Varnum, who married Sarah 
Pierce, of West Cambridge; Anna G., widow 
of Roland Crosby; Artemus, who married 
Maria Haskell; Mary T., widow of George 
Teele; Henrietta, wife of Warren Shattuck; 
and Herbert, who married Mehitable Bird. 

Warren S. Frost was educated in the public 
schools of Belmont. He then took up farm- 
ing on the old family estate. At the present 
time he is engaged in market gardening, of 
which he has made a great success. He is a 
progressive man, and avails himself of all the 
latest ideas in connection with his business. 
In politics a Republican, he is interested in 
all that pertains to the welfare of the commu- 



nity, and especially in educational matters, 
having formerly served on the School Commit- 
tee for fifteen years. He has been a Deacon 
in the Congregational church for many years. 
He was married November 12, 1848, to Mary 
S. Thaxter, by whom he had two children: 
Susan T. , the wife of George Henry An- 
druss; and Warren L., who married Anna 
Wyman. His first wife dying at the age of 
thirty years, Mr. Frost married September 12, 
1855, Lucena H. Lord, by whom he has had 
four children: John Newton, who is now de- 
ceased; Walter L., who married Henrietta 
Eastman; Lucena M. ; and Carleton S. Mrs. 
Frost is a member of the Congregational 
church. 



DWARD KAKAS, a Hungarian patriot 
who served under General Kossuth, 
and is now one of the most extensive 
retail fur dealers in Boston, was born in Buda- 
Pesth, Hungary, in 1828. His father was a 
furrier, and when a young man Edward was 
employed by one of the largest fur dealers in 
Pest. He also worked at his trade in various 
parts of Europe, and, after being in business 
for himself in Pesth for a short time he in 
July, 1848, joined the Revolution, in which 
he served until the fall of 1849. While at- 
tempting to leave the country he was arrested 
by the military forces, and held a prisoner at 
Fort Arad until that stronghold was given up 
to the Russians, when he obtained his liberty. 
He was again apprehended, however, and, 
after giving bonds, made his escape to Lon- 
don. There he found a party of refugees 
formed into a military school by General Kos- 
suth, and taught tactics by their military 
officers, receiving the same pay as if at home. 
This company was soon disbanded, and they 
were given by the English government free 
passage to America, and on their arrival in 
the United States three pounds sterling each. 
Mr. Kakas sought refuge in this country; 
and in 185 i, through the influence of his com- 
patriot, General Kossuth, he secured an op- 
portunity to work at his trade with Martin 
Bates & Son, of Boston. He remained a 
short time with that firm, was next employed 
by Mr. Slocum, and afterward worked for Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Claus eight years. He then, in 1861, en- 
gaged in business for himself, locating on 
Franklin Street. The general business de- 
pression caused by the outbreak of the Rebell- 
ion somewhat impeded his progress, but he 
managed to keep his head above water, and 
eventually succeeded in building up a very 
profitable trade. The great fire of 1872 totally 
destroyed his stock and fixtures, valued at 
over eighty-five thousand dollars, leaving him 
practically without a dollar and with nothing 
before him but the task of making a new be- 
ginning. His courage was equal to the emer- 
gency, however; and, leasing four small 
rooms over Shepard & Norwell's dry-goods 
store, he started for New York City, with his 
books as his only recommendation for credit. 
He returned shortly with an entire new stock 
of goods and unlimited credit, and during the 
first year in his new quarters he made a profit 
of ten thousand dollars. He now began to 
import largely, and filled many contracts for 
fur trimmings with Boston retail houses. 
From Shepard & Norwell's he moved to 
Howard's on Winter Street, where he con- 
ducted a wholesale business for a time, going 
from there to Summer Street and later to 
Washington Street, where he carried on busi- 
ness for fifteen years previous to locating at 
his present site on Tremont Street. For 
some years he has confined his efforts to the 
retail trade only, having abandoned some time 
ago the policy of furnishing other dealers 
with goods on commission. 

On July 6, 1853, Mr. Kakas married Jo- 
sephine Kegler, who was born in Weinheim, 
Baden-Baden, Germany, February 18, 1834. 
They have five children, as follows: Edward 
Ferdinand, born in Portland, Me., April 7, 
1854; Theresa Sofia, born in Brookline, 
Mass., August 8, 1855; William Frederick, 
born in West Medford, December 6, 1858; 
Emma Caroline, born in West Medford, Sep- 
tember 8, 1 861; and Carl Edward Kakas, 
born in West Medford, September 22, 1867. 

For nearly forty years Mr. Kakas has been 
a resident of Medford. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, belonging to the Massachu- 
setts Consistory, and is a member of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. 
His eldest son, Edward Ferdinand, is en- 



gaged with him in business, and his two 
younger sons are in business for themselves. 
His youngest daughter is an excellent artist 
in oil. She has a handsome studio, which her 
father erected for her near the family resi- 
dence, and which from a distance has the ap- 
pearance of a cosey cottage. 



§AMES FRANCIS DAVLIN, proprie- 
tor of a plumbing establishment on 
Webster Avenue, Somerville, was born 
in Lowell, Mass., April 25, 1842, son 
of Michael F. and Bridget (McCollough) 
Davlin. 

His paternal grandfather, Patrick Davlin, a 
native of Ireland, lived to be ninety years old. 
He passed his last days in Lowell, Mass. 
Michael F. Davlin was born in Parish Cap- 
pagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. When seven- 
teen he came to the United States and settled 
in Lowell, where he began working at twenty- 
five cents a day for the Hamilton Combination 
Dye-house, folding cloth. He was bright, 
active, and ambitious, and while still young 
he became superintendent of the dye works, 
and was considered an authority in the busi- 
ness. He lived to be only forty years old, 
but had acquired a competence. Five chil- 
dren were born to Michael F. and Bridget 
Davlin. Two died in childhood, and three 
— Susie, Michael, and James Francis — lived 
to maturity. Susie is the wife of Joseph 
Carney, of Lowell. Michael has died. 

James Francis Davlin leceived his early ed- 
ucation in the schools of Lowell, and at six- 
teen began to learn the plumber's trade in 
New York. Enlisting in the United States 
navy on July 14, 1862, he served on the frig- 
ate "Wabash," and other war ships of the 
South Atlantic Squadron, and was eventually 
promoted to be signal quartermaster and at- 
tached to the staff of Admiral Dahlgren. At 
the close of the war he was honorably dis- 
charged after three years of faithful service. 
He then went to Boston, where he worked for 
W. H. Greenleaf as a master plumber up to 
i86g, at which time he formed a copartner- 
ship with his brother Michael in the plumb- 
ing and gas-fitting business in Cambridge, 
Mass. In 1878 he came to Somerville to re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



side, and established a sanitary plumbing es- 
tablishment on Somerville Avenue and Union 
Square, remaining there until 1891. He then 
removed to his present quarters on Webster 
Avenue. He has been very successful, is 
honest and upright in his dealings, and en- 
joys the respect and confidence of the com- 
munity. 

Mr. Davlin was married in 1866 to Rebecca 
Adelaide, daughter of William and Rebecca 
(Edgecomb) Dow, of Lisbon, Me. They 
have no living children. 

In politics Mr. Davlin is a Democrat. 
While living in Cambridge, in 1874 and 1876, 
he was a member of the City Council. In 
1887 he was a Representative to the General 
Court from Somerville, and served on the 
Committee on Towns. He is a member of 
the Willard C. Kinsley Post, No. 139, 
G. A. R., of which he is a Past Commander. 
He has served a term as president of the St. 
Joseph Total Abstinence Society. He is a 
member and has served one year as president 
of the Master Plumbers' Association, com- 
posed of members of the trade in Boston and 
vicinity. The other fraternal organizations 
with which he is affiliated are Niagara Tribe, 
I. O. R. M.; the Royal Order of Good Fel- 
lows; the Ancient Order of United Workmen; 
and the Kearsarge Naval Veterans' Asso- 
ciation. 



/TAHARLES C. ELLIS, M.D., a prom- 
I \y inent homoeopathic physician of 
V^Hs^ Winter Hill, Somerville, was born 
in Berlin, Vt., September 24, 
1848, son of William M. and Louisa R. (Per- 
rin) Ellis. The family is of Scotch descent, 
and the name, it is said, was originally Mc- 
Ellis. Dr. Ellis's paternal grandfather, 
Jabez Ellis, was a native of Connecticut. He 
settled as a pioneer in Berlin, cleared a good 
farm from the wilderness, and lived there to 
the age of eighty-seven years. He married 
for his second wife Eunice Mack, his first 
wife's sister, and by his last union he had a 
family of three sons and three daughters. 

William M. Ellis, the Doctor's father, was 
reared to farm life at the homestead. For 
some time he carried on the place, and he 



later spent twelve years as a lumber operator 
in Michigan, subsequently returning East. 
He is now, in his eighty-fourth year, living 
with his son, Charles C. Louisa R. Perrin, 
his wife, was born in Berlin, Vt. She was a 
daughter of Samuel Perrin, and one of a fam- 
ily of nine children; namely, William, Ed- 
ward, Lewis, Edwin, Louisa, Vienna, Clark, 
Mary, and Elvira. Mr. and Mrs. William 
M. Ellis were attendants of the Congrega- 
tional church. They had two children: Will- 
iam Wadsworth, a mining engineer in Cali- 
fornia; and Charles C, the subject of this 
sketch. Mrs. Ellis died at the age of seventy- 
seven years. 

Charles C. Ellis acquired a common and 
high-school education, and immediately after 
leaving school began the study of medicine. 
He attended lectures at the University of Ver- 
mont and at the Harvard Medical School, and 
was graduated from the former in 1865. He 
was for a short time a surgeon at the United 
States Hospital in Montpelier, Vt. , from 
which he was discharged as First Lieutenant; 
and for the succeeding eight years he prac- 
tised his profession in Barnard, Vt. He next 
devoted a year to the study of homoeopathy, 
and after practising as a physician of that 
school for six years in Claremont, N. H., he 
spent a winter in visiting the hospitals of 
Philadelphia. He resumed practice in 
Nashua, N.H., where he remained some six 
years, or until failing health compelled him 
to seek a rest ; and he then spent a year in 
travel. Since 1887 he has been settled at 
Winter Hill, Somerville, where his practice 
has grown to large proportions. Aside from 
treating general diseases, he makes a specialty 
of the treatment of catarrh. He is a member 
of the Boston Homoeopathic Medical and Sur- 
gical Societies and of the State societies of 
Vermont and New Hampshire. For two years 
he was president of the last-named organiza- 
tion, and at its meetings he read some inter- 
esting papers on rheumatism and pericarditis. 
He was made a Mason in Hiram Lodge, 
Claremont; is a member of Orient Council, 
Somerville, and of Coeur de Lion Command- 
ery. Knights Templar, of Charlestown. He 
is also connected with Paul Revere Lodge, 
No. 184, Knights of Honor, and with other 




ARTHUR P. SMITH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



orders, for some of which he serves as medical 
examiner. 

In 1869 Dr. Ellis was united in marriage 
with Susan A. Palmer, daughter of John M. 
Palmer, a prosperous farmer of VVilliamstown, 
Vt. The Doctor has dealt in real estate 
quite extensively and successfully. He now 
occupies a handsome residence at 351 Broad- 
way. Dr. and Mrs. Ellis are members of the 
Sycamore Congregational Church. 



tRTHUR P. SMITH, principal of the 
South Grammar School of Waltham, 
Mass., was born in this city, Au- 
^*-^ gust I, 1833, son of Nathan and 
Eliza (Wellington) Smith. His father, a na- 
tive of Waltham, born in 1788, died in 1872, 
aged eighty-four years. His mother died in 
1892, at the advanced age of ninety-three 
years. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, five sons and two daughters, four of 
whom survive. 

Arthur P. Smith acquired his education in 
Waltham, Mass., Gilmanton, N. H., and 
Thetford, Vt., and in addition to his regular 
attendance at school he had the advantage of 
private instructors. His first pedagogic ex- 
perience was as teacher in a district school at 
a salary of fourteen dollars per month. Sub- 
sequently he presided over schools in Lex- 
ington (three years), a high and grammar 
school in Belmont (six years), a commercial 
college in Bangor, Me., and a boys' school in 
East Gloucester. In 1868 he commenced his 
duties as principal of the South Grammar 
School, Waltham, which then had an attend- 
ance of forty pupils. The growth of the city 
resulting in an increase in the number of 
scholars, more spacious quarters were found 
necessary and provided; and the same school 
at the present time numbers five hundred and 
sixty-eight pupils, who occupy fourteen rooms. 
Since coming to Waltham, Mr. Smith has 
made a practical and satisfactory test of some 
advanced ideas relative to the public-school 
system; and his work as an educator has been 
marked by a high degree of success. Politi- 
cally, he is a stanch supporter of the Republi- 
can party. He is well advanced in Masonry, 
being Worshipful Master of Monitor Lodge, 



F. & A. M. ; Chaplain of Waltham Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; and a member of Gethsemane 
Commandery, K. T., of Newton. He is also 
Past Grand and present Chaplain of Governor 
Gore Lodge, No. 198, I. O. O. F. ; Past 
Chancellor of Norumbega Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias; a member of Electa Chapter, No. 
19, Order of the Eastern Star, of which he 
was Patron three years; a member of Deborah 
Lodge, Daughters of Rebecca, and also of the 
Temple of Honor. A forceful speaker, he is 
an earnest advocate of the temperance cause, 
and is frequently solicited to deliver lectures 
and addresses upon that subject. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts Schoolmasters' 
Club, also of the Middlesex County School- 
masters' Club, and was formerly a member of 
the Citizens' Club. 

Mr. Smith has been twice married. His 
first wife was in maidenhood Edna J. Gale, of 
Gilmanton, N.H. She died leaving two 
adopted children. On April 3, 1897, he mar- 
ried for his second wife Alice B. Hobbs, 
daughter of William Hobbs, of South Nor- 
ridgewock. Me. Mr. and Mrs. Smith attend 
the Unitarian church. 



W\ 



ALTER CROSBY, a prosperous 
market gardener of Arlington, 
Mass., son of Josiah and Alice 
(Ross) Crosby, was born in Roxbury, Mass., 
February 5, 1844. His grandfather, Fred- 
erick Crosby, was a farmer in Ashburnham, 
Mass., where he died well advanced in years. 
He had thirteen children, of whom only one is 
now living, Caroline, the widow of John Bar- 
rell. The fifth child was Josiah, the father 
of the subject of this sketch. He removed 
from Ashburnham to Dorchester, thence to 
Roxbury, and after living there a short time 
settled, about 1846, in Arlington, then known 
as West Cambridge, where he engaged in 
market gardening. He was an industrious, 
hard-working man and successful in business. 
He was prominent in town affairs, and served 
on the School Board for twenty years. One 
of the public schools is named for him — the 
Crosby School. In politics he was first a 
Whig and later a Republican. His first 
wife, whose maiden name was Lydia Ever- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



beck, had two children, one of whom, Lydia 
Maria, is now living. Mr. Crosby married 
for his second wife Alice, daughter of Daniel 
Ross, of Boston. She was born on the site of 
the N.Y. & N.E. depot in that city. They 
had eleven children, of whom eight are now 
living, namely: Walter, the subject of this 
sketch; George P., who married Ada Howe; 
Alice, widow of Charles Bowers; Mary 
Frances, wife of Fredius Howe; Charles; 
Edgar; Arthur E., of whom there is no 
special mention; and Annie, the wife of Fred- 
erick Abercrombie. 

Walter Crosby was educated in the public 
schools of Arlington, and after leaving school 
went to work for his father on the farm. He 
remained with his father until the latter's 
death in 1887, when, with his brother Charles, 
he succeeded to the estate of over fifteen acres. 
He is now doing a thriving business in gen- 
eral market gardening. Mr. Crosby is a Re- 
publican politically. He served twelve years 
in the capacity of Register of Votes, and in 
1897 he was elected to the Board of Select- 
men without opposition. He is a member of 
the Orthodox Society of Arlington, and be- 
longs to Bethel Lodge, No. 12, I. O. O. F., 
of Arlington. 

He was married in January, 1873, to Jessie 
R. Smith, a daughter of William G. Smith, of 
South Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Crosby have no 
children living. 



fOSIAH S. KENDALL, one of the 
leading men of Belmont, Mass., the 
son of Josiah and Mary Ann (Brown) 
Kendall, was born in Waltham, now 
Belmont, March 30, 1825. His grandfather 
was Joshua Kendall, born probably in Ips- 
wich, Essex County, Mass., September 29, 
1746. He came to Middlesex County when a 
young man, and let himself out as a farm hand 
to Josiah Shattuck, a prominent farmer in 
Cambridge, working for him summers and 
following his trade of shoemaker during the 
winter. He evidently found favor with his 
employer, for he afterward married Mr. Shat- 
tuck's daughter, an only child. Her name 
was Susanna. At her father's death she in- 
herited all the estate, and she and her hus- 



band lived on the farm the rest of their lives. 
She was born December 2, 1756, and died 
September 9, 1803. Her mother's maiden 
name was Mary Hastings. Mr. and Mrs. 
Joshua Kendall had ten children, five girls 
and five boys, Josiah, father of the subject of 
this sketch, being the seventh child. He was 
born January 27, 1788, and was a farmer all 
his life. He purchased the farm where his 
son Josiah S. now lives at the time of his 
marriage. May 29, 1821. He was an intelli- 
gent and industrious farmer, making a spe- 
cialty of dairy products. In politics he was a 
Whig. In religion he was of the liberal faith, 
and with his family attended the Unitarian 
church. He died April 5, 1845, ^t the age of 
fifty-seven years. Mrs. Mary Ann Kendall, 
his wife, was a daughter of Jonas and Relief 
(Pierce) Brown; she was born November 2, 
1797, and died at the age of fifty-two. They 
had six children, all of whom are now living, 
namely: Eliza B., born March 20, 1823; Jo- 
siah S., the subject of this sketch; Joshua, 
born January 4, 1828, who married Phoebe 
Mitchell, of Nantucket, Mass., sister of the 
late Professor Maria Mitchell, astronomer; 
Benjamin, born May 22, 1830, who married 
Sarah Marston, of Pownal, Me. ; Jonas B., 
born May 7, 1834, who married Joanna A. 
Lundergan, of East Cambridge; and George, 
who was born August 25, 1838, and married 
Lucy Harriett Collins, of Watertown, Mass. 

Josiah S. Kendall obtained his education 
in the public schools in Waltham, and after- 
ward engaged in farming, an occupation he 
has followed up to the present time, living on 
the old farm, in a spacious, old-fashioned 
house which was built one hundred and fifty 
years ago. He is one of the most highly es- 
teemed residents of Belmont, and is espe- 
cially interested in town matters. He served 
on the School Committee for four years, has 
been one of the Town Assessors since 1862, 
and was Selectman from 1868 to 1895. Mr. 
Kendall was married on November 24, 1852, 
by the Rev. Thomas Hill, one time president 
of Harvard College, to Martha Helen, a 
daughter of Sullivan and Martha Howe 
(Hardy) Wellington, of Waltham, Mass. 
They have had four children, namely: Mary 
Ann, born December 12, 1853, who married 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Larra W. Munroe, of Jamaica Plain, Mass.; 
George Frederick, born August 28, 1857, who 
married Caroline Frances Ames, of Cam- 
bridge; Walter Shattuck, born March 17, 
1866; and Frances Howe, born August 23, 
1869. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kendall are mem- 
bers of the Unitarian Church in Waverley. 



fAMES SKINNER, of Woburn, presi- 
dent of the James Skinner Leather 
Company, was born in Pictou, N. S. , in 
1835, son of Donald and Annie Belle 
(Loraine) Skinner. Donald Skinner was 
born in Scotland, and came to Nova Scotia 
after he had grown to manhood. He was cap- 
tain of a vessel, and was lost at sea in 1848 
off the Banks of Newfoundland on his way 
from New York City to Cork, Ireland, with a 
cargo of corn for the Irish famine sufferers. 
His wife was a native of Scotland. They 
were married in 1834, and she became the 
mother of four children, three daughters and 
one son, as follows: James; Margaret B., now 
Mrs. John McKay, of Pictou, N.S.; Chris- 
tina M., who married John K. Murdock, of 
Woburn; and Jennie E., who is now a teacher 
in the Plimpton School in Woburn. 

James Skinner was educated in the Pictou 
schools. At the age of sixteen he began to 
learn the carpenter's trade, but after working 
at it for about a year he felt dissatisfied, and 
decided to try something else. Accordingly 
in 185 1 he came to Woburn, and apprenticed 
himself to learn the tanner's and currier's 
trade. After serving an apprenticeship of 
four years, he worked at his trade for a year at 
Marlow, N.H., and another year at his old 
home in Nova Scotia. He then came back to 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and became 
foreman for John B. Alley & Co., at Ayer 
Junction, remaining with that company for a 
year. He next entered the employ of P. 
Chase in Charlestown, and after a year's time 
again returned to Woburn, worked a year for 
A. Thompson & Co., and subsequently became 
foreman for John Cummings & Co., in the 
calf-skin department. . Leaving that position 
at the end of a year, he went to work for 
David Russell on Chestnut Street, and there 
did his first" work for himself, Mr. Russell 



allowing him to buy some stock and work on 
it nights and mornings. This may be con- 
sidered the first step in the independent busi- 
ness career of one who is now the head of one 
of the most prosperous business concerns in 
Woburn. 

In 1862 Mr. Skinner bought out the busi- 
ness and real estate of his employer, and 
started business under his own name. In 
1865 he took Simon Blake into partnership, 
and in 1869 John S. True became a member 
of the firm, which after 1865 was known as 
that of James Skinner & Co. The tannery on 
Green Street in Woburn was purchased, and 
the business was continued until 1882, when 
Mr. Blake withdrew from the company. In 
1890 Mr. True died. In November, 1896, 
the business was incorporated under the name 
of the James Skinner Leather Company, with 
James Skinner as president and treasurer, 
C. G. Lund vice-president, and D. W. Bond 
secretary — these three gentlemen being the 
principal owners of the stock. The business 
is carried on in three different locations. 
The tannery at Green Street, Woburn, is 
specially fitted for the work in glove, satin, 
and split leathers; the Chestnut Street, Wo- 
burn, factory does the work on patent and 
enamelled leather; and at Pearl Street, North 
Woburn, all kinds of colored and fancy 
leathers are prepared. The raw material used 
is obtained principally from the West, al- 
though a small part of it is imported; while 
the bark used in the tanning process comes 
from Canada and from Pennsylvania. The 
total capacity of the three factories is twelve 
hundred sides daily. Thirty-five per cent, of 
the product is exported, and the balance goes 
into domestic trade. About two hundred 
men are employed. The salesroom of the 
company is at 39 South Street, Boston. 

In 1869 Mr. Skinner was united in mar- 
riage with Melina, daughter of Samuel C. and 
Almira Skelton. Four children have been 
born of this union; namely, Mabel Loraine, 
James Lambton, Annie A., and Maud M. 
Mabel Loraine, who was born in 1870, was 
educated in the Woburn schools. She mar- 
ried C. G. Lund, and now resides in Woburn. 
James L., who was born in 1873, attended the 
Woburn schools and subsequently Burdett's 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Business College in Boston, and then entered 
the employ of the Skinner Company as book- 
keeper. He died in August, 1896. Annie 
A., who was born in 1877, is a graduate of 
the Woburn High School in the class of 
1897. Maud M., born 1880, is now a student 
in the high school. 

Mr. Skinner has occupied various public 
offices in Woburn, having been on the Water 
Board, Selectman for five years, on the Sink- 
ing Fund Commission for a number of years, 
president of the Board of Trade for the four 
years succeeding its organization, president 
of the Woburn Co-operative Bank since its 
organization, and at one time director of the 
National Bank of Woburn. In politics he is 
an Independent. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of Mount Horeb Lodge, F. & A. M., at 
Woburn. Mr. Skinner attends the Congrega- 
tional church. 



tRTHUR BARKER JENNEY, M.D., 
who has an extensive practice in 
Stoneham, was born in New Bed- 
^"-^ ford, Mass., March 23, 1854, son 
of Francis and Marietta (Manchester) Jenney. 
On the paternal side he is a descendant of 
Captain Miles Standish. His grandfather, 
Caleb Jenney, who was a native of New Bed- 
ford, was a tanner and shoemaker, and carried 
on business in his native place for many years. 
He lived to be ninety years old. 

Francis Jenney, son of Caleb, was in early 
life engaged in business with his father. He 
later carried on a large grocery store, and 
supplied many whale-ships with provisions for 
their long voyages. He was a well-known 
citizen of New Bedford in his day, and at one 
time commanded the militia forces in that lo- 
cality. He died at the age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, Marietta, who was a native 
of Tiverton, R.I., became the mother of 
eleven children, ten of whom grew to matur- 
ity; and of these Arthur B. , the subject of 
this sketch, was the youngest but one. 

Arthur B. Jenney acquired his elementary 
education in the public schools of New Bed- 
ford. Subsequently completing a classical 
course at the Boston University, he entered 
the medical department of that institution, 



from which he was graduated with the class of 
1888. For two years thereafter he was lo- 
cated in Winchester, N.H., where he prac- 
tised his profession; and in 1890 he estab- 
lished himself in Stoneham. Since settling 
here he has pursued post-graduate courses at 
the Harvard University Medical School and 
the Massachusetts General Hospital. He has 
acquired an extensive practice in Stoneham, 
is secretary of the Board of Health, and a 
mem.ber of the Massachusetts State Surgical 
and Gynaecological Societies. 

Dr. Jenney is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity, the United Order of American 
Mechanics, and the Order of the Golden 
Cross. In politics he is a Republican, and 
his first Presidential vote was cast for R. B. 
Hayes in 1876. 



"ON. JAMES AUGUSTUS FOX, 
one of the prominent citizens of 
Cambridge, Mass., was born in 
Boston, August 11, 1827, son of 
George Plowe and Emily (Wyatt) Fox. He 
is descended on the paternal side from the an- 
cient Fox family of Lincolnshire, England, 
and on the maternal side from the well- 
known Scottish family of Forbes. 

A sketch of the life of Mr. Fox is given in 
the Middlesex County History, published 
in 1890, from which we quote freely. He 
was educated at the Mayhew School and at the 
classical school in Spring Lane kept by Mr. 
Amos Baker. His father was connected in a 
business way with the old Tremont Theatre, 
and as a boy he became familiar with the life 
of an actor. He played children's parts until 
he was twelve years of age, when he played in 
Shakspere's "Romeo and Juliet," in the char- 
acter of Mercutio; and he afterward played 
many parts, from grave to gay, until he began 
to prepare for his profession. He graduated 
from the Law School of Harvard University, 
and, after a period of study in the office of the 
late Hon. John C. Park, was admitted to the 
Suffolk bar in 1854, commencing practice in 
the courts of the State. Six years before our 
Civil War, Mr. Fox enlisted in the regular 
militia of the State, and rose from the ranks 
to the command of Boston City Guards. This 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



company formed the nucleus of the Thirteenth 
Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers; and as 
Captain of Company A of that regiment he 
left Boston for the front, July 29, 1861. He 
took part in the campaigns of 1861 and 1862, 
and in all engagements up to the date of the 
second battle of Bull Run. 

His war experiences have led him to con- 
nect himself in later years with various social 
organizations. He has been elected president 
of the Thirteenth Regiment Association for 
several terms, is a member of the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion of the United 
States, and of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, having been since 1868 a comrade of the 
John A. Andrew Post, No. 15, of Boston, of 
which he was Commander in 1890. He was 
Commander of the Ancient and Honorable Ar- 
tillery Company of Massachusetts in 1864-65, 
and was one of the appointed delegates of 
that body at the three hundred and fiftieth an- 
niversary of the Honorable Artillery Company 
of London, celebrated during the jubilee sea- 
son of Queen Victoria, in June, 1887, on 
which occasion he enjoyed their hospitality 
and the distinguished honor of a presentation 
at court. He made visits to Europe at seven 
or eight different times. He is honorably 
connected with a large number of fraternities 
and secret societies in which he has held 
office, including the highest grade in Free 
Masonry. 

His political career has been equally dis- 
tinguished. At the close of the war he served 
for three years on the Boston School Commit- 
tee; in 1867-68 he was elected to the House 
of Representatives; and in 1870-71 he was a 
member of the Senate, where, besides serving 
on many important committees, "he estab- 
lished a reputation as a graceful and proficient 
orator." 

He married in 1848 Julia Elizabeth, 
daughter of Colonel James and Julia (Sterry) 
Valentine, of Providence, R. L Her paternal 
grandparents were William and Elizabeth 
(Borden) Valentine, of Fall River, her grand- 
father having been one of the original projec- 
tors of the extensive manufacturing enter- 
prises of that city. Mrs. Fox died in 1872, 
leaving three daughters — Henrietta, Julia, 
and Lillian Valentine. Henrietta married 



William Macdonald, of Cambridge, and has 
six children — Elfrida Valentine, William 
Valentine, James F"ox, Jessie Valentine, Mal- 
colm Valentine, and Karin Elaine Valentine 
Lundsteadt; Julia married Dr. George A. 
Webber, of Manchester, Mass. ; and Lillian 
Valentine married in 1889 Horace Wakefield, 
M. D., of London, England, and has four chil- 
dren — Gwenda Lillian, Cyril Horace, Nora 
Valentine, and Reginald Fox. Removing to 
Cambridge in 1872, Mr. Fox became a mem- 
ber of the Board of Aldermen, and was after- 
ward elected Mayor of the city, serving for 
four successive years. It is said of him, "In 
the varied relations of life, as legislator, sol- 
dier, orator, officer of potential beneficent 
organizations, and as the chief magistrate of 
a large and cultured municipality, he has ever 
performed his duties with fidelity and gen- 
eral acceptation." 



AVID FUDGE, an esteemed citizen 
of Cambridge, Mass., was born in 
Quebec, Canada, March 17, 1855. 
He is the eldest of the nine chil- 
dren reared by his parents, the 'late Edward 
and Julia (Cowan) Fudge. His father, who 
was for many years a member of the police 
force in Canada, died at the age of seventy, 
and his mother died at sixty-eight. 

David Fudge was educated in the schools of 
Quebec, and at the age of fourteen he began 
to learn the undertaking business in that city. 
He commenced his apprenticeship at the 
cabinet-maker's trade in Canada, and on com- 
ing to Massachusetts entered the employ of 
F. Geldowsky in East Cambridge, where he 
remained until 1886. He started in the 
undertaking business for himself at 136 Cam- 
bridge Street, and in May, 1894, he moved 
to his present location. He has taken courses 
in embalming at the Oriental and United 
States colleges, and is a member of the New 
England and the Massachusetts Undertakers' 
Association. 

Mr. Fudge belongs to a number of fraternal 
societies. He is Junior Deacon of Putnam 
Lodge, F. & A. M.; is a member of Cam- 
bridge Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Cam- 
bridge Commandery, Knights Templar; Naph- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tali Council, of Chelsea; and of Aleppo 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine in Boston, He 
is also connected with St. Omar Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias; Cambridge Lodge, No. 
91, Knights of Honor; Victor Lodge, 
Knights and Ladies of Honor; Kenilworth 
Castle, Knights of the Golden Eagle; the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, of Soni- 
erville; New England Lodge, No. 4, 
L O. O. F. ; New England Encampment, No. 
34, Patriarchs Militant; the New England 
Order of Protection; and the Putnam Club. 
Mr. Fudge was joined in marriage with 
Mary A. Wheeler, of Quebec, in 1874, and 
has two sons; namely, David W. and Edward 
J., both of whom are graduates of the Cam- 
bridge High School. David W. Fudge is a 
well-known violinist. He frequently plays 
with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and his 
services are in demand by churches and as 
soloist in concerts. Edward J. Fudge is in 
company with his father, and is an expert em- 
balmer. 



/^JJTeQRGE YATES WELLINGTON, 
\ f^) I insurance agent, and one of the most 
— highly respected citizens of Arling- 
ton, Mass., was born in this town on August 
22, 1826, son of Dr. Timothy and Lydia 
(Yates) Wellington. He is a descendant of 
Roger Wellington, born about 1609 or 16 10, 
who was one of the earliest proprietors of 
Watertown, 1636. He was admitted freeman 
in 1690, and died in 1698. His wife was 
Mary, daughter of Dr. Richard Palgrave, of 
Charlestown. Benjamin, son of Roger, was 
born in 1645, was married in 1671, and 
died in 1710. His wife was Elizabeth Sweet- 
man, of Cambridge. Their son, Benjamin, 
Jr., who was born in 1676 and died in 
1738, was for many years one of the most 
popular men in town. He was Assessor for 
sixteen years, Town Clerk for fifteen years, 
Town Treasurer for three years, and Repre- 
sentative to General Court for three years. 
He was three times married, the names of his 
wives being respectively Lydia Brown, Eliza- 
beth Phelps, and Mary Whitney. Timothy 
Wellington, son of Benjamin, Jr, , was born 
in 1719, and died in 1760. His wife was Re- 



becca Stone, daughter of Jonathan and Chary 
(Adams) Stone, of Lexington. Timothy, sec- 
ond, the next in line, was born on April 15, 
1747, and died in April, 1809. He married 
Hannah W. Abbott, and both were admitted to 
the church in Lexington on March 30, 1777. 
He was at the battle of Lexington on April 
I9> 1775- 

Dr. Timothy Wellington, father of George 
Y., was born in Lexington in 17S1. He was 
graduated at Harvard College in 1807, and in 
1809 settled for the practice of medicine at 
West Cambridge, now Arlington. He was 
for some time the only qualified physician 
here, and secured an extensive practice. He 
lived in Arlington until his death in 1853, in 
his seventy-second year. In politics he was a 
Whig. He was prominent in town affairs, 
was on the School Board, and was Town 
Clerk for thirty years. He attended the Uni- 
tarian church. Dr. Wellington was twice 
married. His first wife was Maria E. Lord, 
a native of South Berwick, Me., whom he 
married in 181 3, and who died in March, 
1816. By this marriage was one child, Dr. 
William Wellington, now deceased, whose 
first wife was Elizabeth Carter and whose sec- 
ond wife was Martha Carter, sister of Eliza- 
beth. Elizabeth had one child, now the 
widow of Thomas Emerson, of Cambridgeport, 
and mother of one child, Edith. Martha had 
a son, William H., who married Fiorina 
Gray, of Boston, and is the father of Stanwood 
and Rainer Wellington. Lydia, second wife 
of Dr. Timothy Wellington, was the daughter 
of Francis and Ruth (Thorndike) Yates, of 
Cape Elizabeth, Me. She was born June 18, 
1791. She died in November, 1883, in the 
ninety-third year of her age, having been the 
mother of four children ; namely, Francis E., 
Maria E., George Y., and Ellen W. Francis 
E. , who is now deceased, married Martha E. 
Munroe, of Dedham, Mass., who bore him a 
daughter, Florence, now deceased, the wife of 
W. C. Witter, of New York. Mr. and Mrs. 
Witter had a daughter, Florence. Maria E. 
Wellington became the wife of Dr. R. L. 
Hodgdon, of South Berwick, Me., and the 
mother of three children — Frank W., Nellie, 
and Dr. Andrew W. Hodgdon. Ellen W. 
Wellington married Theodore Stanwood, of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Gloucester, Mass., since deceased. She had 
three children: James B., a mechanical en- 
gineer of Cincinnati, Ohio; Mary, wife of Jo- 
seph Wilby, of Cincinnati, Ohio; and Maria, 
the wife of W. H. Kenyon, of New York. 

George Y. Wellington attended the public 
schools of Arlington in his early years, and 
fitted for college at Medford and at a private 
school in Belmont. In 1844 he entered the 
office of S. F. Felton, who was then chief 
civil engineer of the Fitchburg Railroad. 
He remained with Mr. Felton up to 1850, and 
had charge of the construction of the Arling- 
ton branch of the Fitchburg Road. He sub- 
sequently went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and be- 
came division civil engineer on construction 
work for the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton 
Railroad, and later was appointed chief civil 
engineer in its extensions and branches. He 
held this position until 1856, when he went to 
Glenwood, la., on the Missouri River as civil 
engineer and surveyor of the Burlington & 
Missouri River Railroad. In 1859 he re- 
moved to Chicago, and for a short time was 
land examiner of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road. The next year, i860, he returned to 
Arlington, where he shortly afterward pur- 
chased the lease of the Arlington Horse Rail- 
way, which he managed and controlled up to 
1869. In 1866 he was appointed liquidating 
clerk at the Boston custom-house, and in Sep- 
tember, 1871, was appointed examiner in the 
United States department of the custom-house, 
where he remained for twenty years. In July, 
1886, he resigned, and at that time he re- 
ceived many marks of recognition for his able 
work in the department. Shortly after his 
resignation Mr. Wellington engaged in the in- 
surance business, which he still continues to 
successfully conduct in Arlington. He has 
been a Justice of the Peace for twenty-five 
years, is trustee of the Five Cent Savings 
Bank at Arlington, and is also on the Board 
of Examining Committee. 

Mr. Wellington was married on July 29, 

1857, in Baltimore, Md., to Susan A. Schultz, 
of that city. Four children have been born of 
this union; namely, Frank Y., Ethel L., 
Annette S., and Arthur J. Frank Y., who 
was born in Glenwood, la., on August 12, 

1858, married Elizabeth L. Procter, of Ar- 



lington. Ethel and Annette established a 
private school in Arlington in 1885, and are 
at the present time conducting it most suc- 
cessfully. Arthur J. Wellington, who gradu- 
ated from Harvard College in 1894 and from 
the law school in 1896, was admitted to the 
Suffolk County bar in 1897, and is now prac- 
tising law in Boston. 

Mr. Wellington is a Republican. He has 
been a member of Hiram Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of Arlington, since 1866; and ten years be- 
fore, while residing in the West, he became a 
member of Glenwood Lodge, and was for a 
a time its secretary. 



ffREDERICK P. RUTTER, president 
and manager of the Waltham Coal 
Company Corporation, was born in this 
city, August 16, 1851, son of Josiah and Abi- 
gail (Baldwin) Rutter. The Rutters are of 
Scotch origin and descendants of John Rutter, 
who settled in Wayland, Mass., about two 
hundred years ago. John Rutter built the 
first church in Wayland, and its archives are 
included among the records of that town. 
Several members of the family served in the 
Revolutionary War; and Micah Maynard Rut- 
ter, grandfather of Frederick P., was a Major- 
general in the State militia, Sheriff of Mid- 
dlesex County for some years, a member of the 
House of Representatives, and State Senator. 
Josiah Rutter, Frederick P. Rutter's father, 
was a native of Wayland. He was graduated 
at Harvard University, and subsequently prac- 
tised law in Waltham for more than thirty 
years. He took an active part in public 
affairs, especially in educational matters, and 
was chairman of the School Committee for 
twelve years. He served as Trial Justice fif- 
teen years, and represented Waltham in the 
legislature two or three terms. He died in 
1876, aged sixty-three years. His wife, Abi- 
gail Baldwin Rutter, was a sister of Will- 
iam H. Baldwin, who is now president of the 
Young Men's Christian Union in Boston. 
She was the mother of four sons, namely: 
William B., an artist of repute, who died in 
November, 1888; Frederick P., the subject 
of this slcetch; Francis J., who is connected 
with the New England Dressed Meat and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Wool Company, of Boston; and Nathaniel P., 
who carries on a hardware business in 
Waltham. She died in May, 1889. 

Frederick P. Rutter attended the common 
and high schools of Waltham, and for six 
years after the completion of his studies he 
was clerk in the dry-goods store of Clark, 
Maynard & Co. Then for four years he was a 
member of the firm of Rutter Brothers, coal 
dealers. Selling out to William A. Hunne- 
well, he remained a manager of the business 
until the formation of the Waltham Coal Com- 
pany Corporation some five years ago. This 
concern, of which Mr. Rutter is president and 
manager, has two yards in Waltham, besides 
branches in Belmont and Bemis. Mr. Rutter 
is also vice-president of the Suburban Coal 
Club. He was for four years president of the 
Cemetery Board, but recently resigned in 
order to become a member of the Board of As- 
sessors. He is Senior Warden of Monitor 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Principal Sojourner in 
Waltham Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; a 
member of Adoniram Council, Royal and Se- 
lect Masters; and of Gethsemane Command- 
ery. Knights Templar, of Newton. He is 
also treasurer of Rumford Council, Royal 
Arcanum ; a member of Prospect Lodge, No. 
35, L 0. O. F. ; and of the Encampment of 
Waltham. He attends the First Unitarian 
Church, and is a member of the Parish Com- 
mittee. 

In 187s Mr. Rutter was united in marriage 
with Minnie H. Upham, daughter of County 
Commissioner Samuel O. Upham, of this city, 
and has one daughter, Abby B. , a graduate of 
Waltham High School, class of 1897. 



]ClLBRIDGE HENRY GOSS, author of 
Jp! "The Life of Colonel Paul Revere," 
'^"^ "■ " is a resident of Melrose, Mass., 
where for more than twenty years he has held 
the position of treasurer of the Melrose Sav- 
ings Bank. Pie was born in Boston, Decem- 
ber 22, 1830; and, although his father, Henry 
Goss, was a native of Vermont, he comes of 
substantial Massachusetts stock, his grand- 
father, Zebulon Goss, who married Delana 
Prouty, having been born and bred in Men- 
don, Worcester County, this State. 



Henry Goss was one of a large family of 
children. He was born in 1806, and was 
married in 1829 to Betsey, daughter of Luke 
Kendall, of Vermont. He and his bride soon 
came to Boston, where he was engaged in the 
restaurant business until his death in 1845. 
He reared three children, of whom Elbridge 
Henry is the only survivor. 

Elbridge H. Goss was educated in the Bos- 
ton public schools, after leaving the Adams 
School, attending the English High School 
a year. At the age of sixteen he began the 
active duties of life in earnest, and the fol- 
lowing three years was a clerk in the clothing 
store of Kimball & Fisk, on old Washington 
Street. The next two years he was cashier 
in the dry-goods house of Chandler & Co., 
then on Summer, now on Winter Street, after 
which he spent five years with W. F. Shaw 
& Co., on Washington Street. He then ac- 
cepted the position of book-keeper for A. L. 
White & Co., leather dealers, and was with 
that firm and its successors, Emerson & 
White, thirty consecutive years. In the mean- 
time, in 1856, he had settled in Melrose, 
where, in 1876, he became treasurer of the 
Melrose Savings Bank, a position that he still 
holds, although he has resigned as a book- 
keeper. Since coming to this town, he has 
taken an active part in public matters, and 
filled many important offices. He was Auditor 
several years, was Water Registrar four years, 
in 1870 was elected a trustee of the Public 
Library, and is now and has been for several 
years chairman of its Board of Trustees. In 
1874 and 1S75 he represented the town in the 
State legislature, where he served during his 
first term on the Committee on Libraries and 
during the second as chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Engrossed Bills. He is a Deacon of 
the Melrose Orthodox Congregational Church, 
has been superintendent of the Sunday-school, 
and for more than twoscore years has been 
treasurer and collector of that church organi- 
zation. He is a member of the Bostonian 
Society, the New England Historic Genea- 
logical Society, the American Historical 
Society, and the Bunker Hill Monument As- 
sociation. He also belongs to several benefi- 
ciary organizations. 

Mr. Goss is deeply interested in everything 




ELBRIDGE H. GOSS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



associated with the early life of the New Eng- 
land colonies ; and to the historical literature 
of this part of Massachusetts he has made 
many valuable contributions, among his pub- 
lished works being the following : "The Mel- 
rose Memorial ; or, History of Melrose in the 
Rebellion," written in 1868; "Early Bells 
of Massachusetts," which was issued in pam- 
phlet form ; " Centennial Fourth " ; " History 
of Melrose," for Drake's "History of Mid- 
dlesex County," published in 1880; "A His- 
tory of Melrose," for J. W. Lewis & Co. 's 
"History of Middlesex County," written in 
1890; and "The Life of Colonel Paul Re- 
vere," in two volumes, printed and published 
in 1S91, by Joseph G. Cupples, bookseller, 
of Boylston Street, Boston, and now in its 
second edition. He has likewise contributed 
interesting articles on the early history of 
New England to the Magazine of American 
History, to the Neiv England Magazine, and 
other publications; and in 1889 he published 
"The Bibliography of Melrose." 

On December 22, 1853, Mr. Goss married 
Hannah Jane, daughter of Martin and Pru- 
dence (Richardson) Baker, of Boston, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Goss have two children, namely: 
Frank Martin, born in 1855; and Mary Alice, 
born in 1863. F'rank Martin, who was edu- 
cated in the Melrose public schools, and is 
now manager of the educational publications 
of Lee & Shepard, at 10 Milk Street, Boston, 
married Abbie D., daughter of Robert S. D. 
Symonds, of Peabody, Mass., and resides in 
Melrose. Mary Alice is the wife of Edward 
E. Babb, of Melrose, and has one son, Edward 
Everett Babb, Jr. 



iHARLES H. DANIELS, a respected 
citizen of Waltham, was born in East 

Cambridge, Mass., July 25, 1834. 

When he was three years old his 
parents moved to Needham, Mass., where he 
attended school until he was ten years old. 
His studies were subsequently completed in 
the public schools of Waltham and at the 
Wrentham Academy. When a young man he 
worked at chair painting in Gardner, Mass., 
but, not finding that employment to his lik- 
ing, he learned the trade of a blacksmith. 



After spending six months in the West, he 
returned to Waltham, and, engaging in the 
blacksmith business for himself, he for many 
years carried on shops in this city and at 
West Newton. He was financially success- 
ful, and in 1893 retired from active business 
pursuits. He has always declined to accept 
nominations to public office, and in politics is 
independent. 

On June i, 1856, Mr. Daniels was united 
in marriage with Nancy M. Adams, of West 
Cambridge (now Arlington), and has two chil- 
dren, a son and daughter — Henry A. and 
Marion E. 

Mrs. Daniels is a lady of prominence in 
various social and reform organizations, pos- 
sessing much energy of purpose and rare, intel- 
lectual attainments. She has been president 
of the Woman's Club for the past two years, 
is a trustee of the Leland Home for Aged 
Women, and is actively connected with the 
Christian Union and the Women's Auxiliary. 



(^JVLVAH BUCKMAN, the well-known 
Y\ boot and shoe dealer of Woburn, was 
yJ^V born in this town in 1822, son of 

^-^ Willis and Delia Pierce (Johnson) 
Buckman. His paternal grandfather was 
Jacob Buckman, a native of Maiden, Mass., 
and a shoemaker by trade, who married Eliza- 
beth Monroe, of Lexington. 

Willis Buckman, son of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth, was born in Lexington in 1794. He 
settled in Woburn previous to 1822, and was 
engaged in the shoe manufacturing business 
here until his death, which occurred in 1S65. 
In early manhood he was interested in mili- 
tary affairs, and served in the State militia. 
He was a member of the Congregational 
church. His wife, Delia Pierce Johnson, 
whom he married in 18 19, was a daughter of 
Munson Johnson, of Lexington. She became 
the mother of four children, three of whom 
are living, namely: Alvah, the subject of this 
sketch; Austin, who was born in 1826, and 
resides in Woburn; and Minot J., who was 
born in 1833, '^'^^ is now a retired shoe manu- 
facturer of this city. 

Alvah Buckman began his education in the 
common schools, and completed it at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Warren Academy. When twelve years old he 
entered his father's factory as an apprentice, 
and after learning the trade he continued to 
work as a journeyman shoemaker until 1857. 
In that year he established himself in the 
boot and shoe business, in which he is still 
actively and successfully engaged. 

In 1845 Mr. Buckman married Susan Bul- 
finch, daughter of Amos and Hannah Bulfinch, 
oi Lynn, Mass. Of the three children born 
of this union two are living, namely: Francis 
A., whose birth was in 1848; and Susan B., 
born in 1855. Francis A. Buckman has been 
connected with his father's business since his 
youth. He was married in 1884 to Christa 
McClellan, a native of Nova Scotia, and has 
two children — Alvah and Evelyn. He is a 
member of Crystal Font Lodge, No. 9, 
I. O. O. F. Susan married E. G. Clough, 
and resides at Newton Highlands. 

Mr. Buckman joined the Congregational 
church when he was sixteen years old, and 
has since been closely identified with relig- 
ious work. He has served upon the Parish 
Committee, and taught in the Sunday-school 
about forty years, and for the past twenty 
years he has been a Deacon of the church. 



/^pTEORGE KENDALL WALCOTT, 
\ p I station master for the Boston & 
^-^ Maine Railroad at Prospect Hill, 
Somerville, was born in Brighton, Mass., Sep- 
tember 24, 1843, son of Freeman and Lorena 
(Wood) Walcott. His father, who was born 
July 14, 1807, was one of twins. The other, 
who was named Truman, lived to the age of 
seventy-eight years. The remaining children 
of the family — Asa, Augustus, Josiah, and 
Sarah — are still living, the last named being 
the wife of A. H. Pope. Freeman Walcott 
was a large contractor and builder, and erected 
the old Ouincy House in Boston, the Insane 
Asylum at Northampton, and the Reform 
School at Westboro, besides more than fifty 
churches in the States of Massachusetts, Ver- 
mont, and New Hampshire. He died at Bol- 
ton, Mass., March 27, 1884. His wife, 
Lorena, who was born in Stow, Mass., died 
March i, 1887. She bore her husband seven 
sons, namely: Sylvester, who died in infancy; 



Charles F., who died in California, to which 
State he went in 1849; Alfred W., who was 
First Lieutenant in Company G, Fortieth 
New York Regiment, and is also deceased, 
his death having occurred in Milford, Mass., 
in 1886; Andrew P., who is a resident of 
Lynn; Harrison T., who during the war was 
Captain of Company H, Fortieth Regiment of 
New York Volunteers, and was killed at the 
battle of the Wilderness; George K. ; and 
Clifford P., the last named a resident of Hud- 
son, Mass. 

The boyhood of George K. Walcott was 
spent chiefly in Watertown, where he also re- 
ceived his elementary education. He subse- 
quently resided successively in Framingham 
and Milford, in which places he pursued more 
advanced studies. When the Civil War broke 
out he enlisted, but after a month spent in the 
service was forced to resign by the urgent so- 
licitations of his father. On February 24, 
1864, however, he re-enlisted in the Four- 
teenth Massachusetts Battery as bugler, under 
Captain J. W. B. Wright, and served until 
the close of the struggle. He saw hard fight- 
ing and rough service from the battles of the 
Wilderness to Appomattox. At Spottsyl- 
vania he acted as Orderly to General Ledlie, 
and was under almost constant fire, but es- 
caped unhurt. June 25, 1865, he was mus- 
tered out at Readville, Mass. Promptly re- 
suming the duties of civil life he went to 
Brattleboro, Vt., where he secured employ- 
ment in the freight office of the old Vermont 
and Massachusetts Railroad. In August, 
1866, he was sent to Westminster, Mass., to 
take charge of the station, and he remained 
there as station master for fifteen years. In 
1 88 1 he went West, and was station master 
for about a year and a half at Weyauwega, 
Wis., for the Wisconsin Central Railroad. 
He then returned to Massachusetts, but soon 
removed again to Brattleboro, where he re- 
sumed the position which he had left in 1866. 
He later was made yard-master, and he re- 
mained in Brattleboro on this occasion for 
about three years. In 1886 he came to 
Somerville, receiving the appointment of sta- 
tion master on the Boston & Lowell Railroad 
(now Boston & Maine) at Prospect Hill, 
which position he has since retained. He was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married July 21, 1867, at Westminster, 
Mass., to Liicinda, daughiter of J. Elliot 
Gates, of Westminster, and has one child, a 
daughter, Carrie by name. Mr. Walcott is a 
member of Charles W. Moore Lodge, F. & 
A. M., at Fitchburg; of North Star Chapter, 
R. A. M., at Winchendon: Winter Hill 
Lodge, A. O. U. W. (Master Workman) ; 
United Order of the Golden Cross, No. 264, 
wherein he has passed all the chairs; and of 
W. C. Kinsley Post, No. 139, G. A. R., of 
which he is now Commander. 



fOHN ABBOTT, a prominent machinist 
of Waltham in his day, was born in 
Billerica, Mass., in 1805. He was 
the youngest son of James and Mehit- 
able (Holt) Abbott, and a lineal descendant 
of George Abbot, who settled at Andover, 
Mass., about 1643, and the roll of whose 
numerous posterity includes many distin- 
guished names. 

George Abbot married Hannah Chandler; 
and their son Nathaniel, the twelfth of a fam- 
ily of thirteen children, was the father of Jo- 
seph, who married Deborah Blanchard, had 
fourteen children, and spent his last years at 
Wilton, N.H., where he died in 1787. His 
son, Joseph, Jr., grandfather of the subject of 
our sketch, was a farmer in Andover, Mass., 
and later in life in Southern New Hampshire. 
He married Mary Barker, and was the father 
of seven children, the third being James, 
above named, a merchant of Billerica, born at 
Andover, Mass., in 1768. James Abbott mar- 
ried Mehitable Holt, daughter of Daniel and 
Mehitable (Putnam) Holt, of Andover, Mass., 
and Wilton, N.H. He was Town Clerk of 
Billerica in 1797 and Representative to the 
General Court of Massachusetts in 1803. He 
died in 1810, when his son John was about 
five years old. Mrs. Mehitable Holt Abbott, 
who was a very worthy and capable woman, 
removed after her husband's death to Milford, 
N. H. She lived to the age of ninety-nine 
years. 

John Abbott was educated in Milford, 
N.H., and learned his trade in Waltham. He 
eventually engaged in business for himself, 
employing at one time over one hundred 



workmen, among the apprentices in his shop 
being Nathaniel P. Banks, afterward Governor 
and General Banks. Mr. Abbott was at a 
later period engaged in setting up machinery 
in several cotton-mills in Lowell; and he also 
superintended the equipment of mills in 
Orono, Me. He was recalled to Waltham by 
the offer of a large salary, and resided here 
until his death, which occurred in 1842, at 
the age of thirty-seven years. He was a Dem- 
ocrat in politics, was elected Representative 
to the legislature from Waltham in 1841, and 
served during the session of 1842. Failing 
health caused him to decline a renomination, 
and he was succeeded by Nathaniel P. Banks. 

Mr. Abbott is survived by his wife, for- 
merly Olive Haynes, whqm he married in 
1832, and a daughter Clara. Mrs. Abbott 
was born in Sudbury, Mass., April 11, 181 1, 
daughter of Josiah and Lydia (Conant) 
Haynes, her mother a native of Concord, 
Mass. Mrs. Abbott's paternal grandfather, 
Jason Haynes, and his father, Josias, took 
part in the famous Concord fight on the 19th 
of April, 1775; and her father, Josiah Haynes, 
who was then but a young boy, ever after re- 
membered listening, with the anxious women 
and children of the neighborhood who had 
gathered at their house, to the distant firing. 
A gun that Jason Haynes took from a British 
soldier whom he had shot was long kept at the 
homestead. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Ab- 
bott carried on the millinery business in com- 
pany with her sister for about fifteen years. 
She still resides in Waltham. Her daughter, 
Clara, was educated in the public schools of 
Waltham, including the high school, and in 
the State Normal School at West Newton. 
She subsequently taught school in Waltham, 
Waverley, and Newton, being thus engaged 
upward of twenty years. Miss Abbott is a 
member of the Emerson-Browning Club, and 
both she and her mother have been members 
of the corporation of the Leland Home for 
Aged Women since its organization. They 
are also connected with the Waltham Woman's 
Club and the Waltham Branch of the Women's 
Alliance (Unitarian). They are members of 
the Unitarian church, as was also the late Mr. 
Abbott. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"jClDWARD PAYSON SCALES, M.D., 
^1 one of the most prominent and success- 
'^^ '' ful physicians of Newton, Mass., was 
born July 17, 1831, in Henniker, N.H., where 
his father, the late Rev. Jacob Scales, was 
pastor of the Congregational church. He is a 
direct descendant of William Scales, who 
came over from England in 1640, and settled 
at Rowley, Essex County, Mass. The ne.xt in 
this line was William, second, followed by 
his son William, third, father of Thomas, 
whose son Samuel was the father of the Rev. 
Jacob, above named. The third William 
Scales, grandson of the immigrant, was a 
pioneer settler in Maine. 

The Rev. Jacob Scales was born in Free- 
port, now North Yarmouth, Me., in 1788. In 
18 17 he was graduated from Dartmouth Col- 
lege, and in 1820 from the Andover Theologi- 
cal Seminary. He was ordained in Decem- 
ber, 1820, as pastor of the West Parish, 
Colchester, Conn., of which he had charge six 
years. Receiving a call from the church at 
Henniker, N.H., he was there installed in 
January, 1827. He preached his farewell 
sermon at Henniker on March i, 1839. 
After that he had a three years' pasorate at 
Cornwall, Vt., and was subsequently settled 
in Plainfield, N.H., where his death occurred 
in 1873. His wife, Nancy Beaman, whom he 
married in 1821, was the daughter of Aaron 
and Phoebe Beaman, of North Bridgton, Me. 

The Doctor is the only one of their children 
now living. He was prepared for college at 
the Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, 
N.H. While a student he paid his own ex- 
penses as a general thing by teaching, being 
thus engaged in Hartford, Vt., Plainfield, 
N.H., Kittery, Me., and in Prattsville, N.Y., 
where, from October, 1855, until April, 1856, 
he was associate principal in a boys' boarding- 
school. He began the study of medicine 
with his brother, T. S. Scales, A.M., M.D., 
of Woburn, Mass., and in the fall of 1857 at- 
tended medical lectures at Dartmouth Col- 
lege, the following winter being employed as 
a teacher at Hanover, N.H. During the 
winter of 1858-59 he attended medical lect- 
ures at Cleveland, Ohio, and on March 5, 
1859, received the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine from the Cleveland Homoeopathic Medi- 



cal College. Dr. Scales began the practice 
of his profession at South Dedham, now Nor- 
wood, where he was successfully engaged from 
May, 1859, until April, 1861. The ensuing 
two years he was located in Winchester, 
Mass., whence he came to Newton in April, 
1863. Here he has built up a very satisfac- 
tory and remunerative practice, having been in 
the place at least ten years longer than any 
other physician, and in this period, by his 
promptitude and skill in the treatment of 
diseases, winning the confidence of the entire 
community. He has steadily declined all 
civil and military honors, his professional 
duties requiring all of his time. 

He is especially interested in the Newton 
Hospital, which was first organized in 1880, 
and has been prominent in its management 
since its inauguration in June, 1886. This 
was the first institution of the kind on record 
under the management of the two leading 
schools of medicine, working together in per- 
fect harmony, with an equal chance for each 
school. It is in a very prosperous condition, 
and has an average daily attendance of fifty 
patients. 

Dr. Scales is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Homoeopathic Medical Society and of the 
American Institute of Homoeopathy, the oldest 
national medical society in existence. He 
also belongs to various other medical associa- 
tions. He still maintains his interest in 
Dartmouth College, and in 1880, 1883, 1885, 
and 1895, attended the commencement exer- 
cises. 

Dr. Scales and H. Elizabeth Fowle, daugh- 
ter of Edward and Hannah (Damon) Fowle, of 
Woburn, Mass., were married on the 4th of 
May, 1859. They have the following chil- 
dren: May B., born in 1864; George C, who 
was born in 1866, was graduated at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology in 1888, and 
is now superintendent of the Boston Paving 
Company; Nettie E., born in 1868; William 
E., born in 1869, who has been employed for 
seven years by a shipping firm in Galveston, 
Tex.; Charles H., born December 28, 1872, 
who died July 22, 1874; Luther D., born in 
1874, now employed with Brown & Wales, a 
hardware firm of Boston; and Carrie L. , born 
in 1876, who was graduated in 1897 at the 




JOHN PARHAM. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Posse Gymnasium, Boston, established by 
Baron Nils Posse. 



§OHN PARHAM, a prosperous farmer 
and business man of Tyngsboro, was 
born in this town, January 9, 1821, son 
of William and Sarah (Parham) Par- 
ham. The Parhams were among the first set- 
tlers of this county. The family began with 
John Parham, who is said to have come from 
Coventry, England, and located in Chelmsford 
in 1666. His son Joseph, who was born in 
Chelmsford, October 22, 1669, in company 
with Joseph Butterfield, also of Chelmsford, 
settled on the east side of the Merrimac 
River on November 27, 171 1. Joseph mar- 
ried Dorothy Kidder, and reared a family of 
four sons and seven daughters. His son Jona- 
than married Judith Wyman, of Pelham, 
N.H., and had two sons — Jonathan, second, 
and William. The second Jonathan for some 
time remained on the farm where the present 
John Parham now resides, but, having extensive 
business to attend to, sold it to Lot Spalding. 
It was not to pass out of the family, however; 
for two years later it was purchased by his 
nephew, John Parham's father. Jonathan, 
second, married Mercy Coburn, and had one 
daughter, Mercy, who married Lemuel Law- 
rence, and was the mother of Daniel Lawrence, 
the famous manufacturer of Medford rum. 
William Parham, Sr., John's grandfather, built 
a house at Long Pond, a short distance from 
the old home. A Revolutionary patriot, he 
was at Saratoga, and witnessed the surrender 
of Burgoyne. He married Ruth Merrill, of 
West Nottingham, N. H., whose children by 
him were: William, Sargent, Betsey, Ruth, 
and Sally. 

William Parham, Jr., John's father, pur- 
chased the old homestead of his uncle Jona- 
than in 181 7, and resided there until his 
death. He also was a soldier, serving in the 
War of 1 81 2, and subsequently the recipient 
of a pension. Public service was also ren- 
dered by him in a number of important town 
offices. He built the present brick house in 
1831. His death occurred in 1880, in his 
ninety-first year. His wife was a daughter of 
John and Jemima (Blodgett) Parham. Their 



children were: William, who died in child- 
hood ; Sarah, who was the wife of Samuel 
Gowan, of Hudson, N. H., and died at the age 
of seventy-seven; John, the subject of this 
sketch ; Joseph, who died at the age of twenty ; 
David, vmmarried, now a resident of Tyngs- 
boro; Nathaniel, who died at the age of nine- 
teen; Alicia, who became the wife of D. S. 
Jordan, of Lawrence; and Daniel, deceased, 
who spent his life on a part of his father's 
farm. 

John Parham succeeded his father as owner 
and manager of the home farm, and has added 
largely to the original estate. With about 
twenty acres of the old Jonathan Parham place, 
he has about sixty acres of the original Butter- 
field and Parham tract. As a farmer and 
business man he has been very successful. 
He owns stock in the Washington Mill of 
Lawrence, the Franklin Company of Lewis- 
ton, Me., the Lowell & Nashua Railroad, and 
in most of the mills of Lowell. 

Mr. Parham was married October 23, 185 1, 
to Miss Abbie Damon, of New Hampshire, 
daughter of Warren Damon, formerly of Read- 
ing, Mass. They have had three children — 
William, Florence Alicia, and Dora. Dora 
died in infancy. William Parham, born De- 
cember 6, 1853, died on the farm. May 17, 
1 89 1. He was married January i, 1880, to 
Fanny Burns Cummings, who died March 6, 
1885. They left one daughter, Maude Alicia, 
now a girl of sixteen, who lives with her 
grandparents, and attends school in Tyngs- 
boro. Florence Alicia Parham was born May 
2, 1858, and died September 14, 1893. She 
was married January 18, 1882, to Frank Sum- 
ner Bennett, who was born May 12, 1857. 
Mr. Bennett was a Representative in the State 
legislature when he died, on April 18, 1895. 
He left a daughter, Marion, eleven years of 
age. 



iRS. MARY BARNARD HORNE, 
a much respected citizen of Bel- 
mont, Mass., the daughter of 
Samuel and Sarah Ann (Crafts) 
Barnard, was born in Belmont, Mass., on the 
old Barnard homestead where she still lives, 
her husband, George W. Home, having died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1877. This farm was purchased many 
years ago by James Barnard after his marriage 
with Sarah Temple, of Watertown, his native 
place. He was a very successful farmer and a 
prominent citizen of the town. He died in 
1802. He was a Whig in politics and a Uni- 
tarian in religious belief. 

The fourth of his seven children was Sam- 
uel, Mrs. Home's grandfather, who lived in 
Belmont, engaged somewhat in farming, being 
also in the ice business. He was connected 
with the firm of Tudor, Gage & Co., who 
were one of the first firms to cut and ship ice 
to the South. At one time Mr. Samuel Bar- 
nard cut ice in Boston Harbor. He was a 
Whig in politics. He lived to be fifty-nine 
years old, and his wife, Sabra Vila, of Water- 
town, lived to the age of seventy-three. In 
religion they were Unitarians. They had 
four children, and their eldest son was Sam- 
uel, Jr., the father of Mrs. Home. 

He was bom in Belmont, March 7, 18 17, 
and was engaged in market gardening on the 
old home farm all his life. He was a very 
successful horticulturist, and raised fine 
strawberries, which were his especial pride 
and delight. Mr. Barnard was a Republican 
in politics and a prominent man in town 
affairs. He was a member of the Unitarian 
church. He died at the age of seventy-six, 
and his wife, Sarah Ann Crafts, died at the 
age of fifty-three. They had five children, of 
whom but two are now living: Mary B., Mrs. 
Home; and Edward H., living with his sis- 
ter at the old homestead, where he is engaged 
in farming. 

The late Mr. George W. Home was an 
architect in the employ of the, noted firm of 
Sturgis & Brigham, of Boston, and was con- 
sidered one of the first men in his profession. 
At the time of the Civil War Mr. Horne en- 
listed in the Fifth Massachusetts Regiment, 
Company K, as a private, and served for nine 
months on guard duty. At the close of the 
war he was promoted to the rank of Corporal. 
In his death, in 1877, not only the members of 
his family but the townspeople in general sus- 
tained a loss that was deeply felt. Three 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Horne, 
namely: Richard, a musician; Harold; and 
Geoffrey Crafts, who is now living at the old 



homestead with his mother. The second son, 
Harold Horne, is a graduate of Harvard in 
the class of 1894 and of the Lawrence Scien- 
tific School, 1896. He is at the present time 
an engineer of the Metropolitan Water Board. 



UFUS R. WADE, of West Somer- 
ville, Chief of the Massachusetts 
State Police, is a native of Boston 
and a son of Abraham and Johanna 
(Robbins) Wade. After acquiring an educa- 
tion in the Boston public schools, he engaged 
in the manufacture of blank books, his place 
of business being located in the alley where 
Young's Hotel now stands. He was later ap- 
pointed Postmaster at East Cambridge, and 
served in that capacity for ten years. During 
the succeeding eleven years he held official 
appointments in various penal institutions of 
the State, including the House of Correction 
in Cambridge and the State Prison in Charles- 
town. Afterward he served successively as 
special agent of the Post-office Department 
in Washington and as Chief of the Secret 
Service Department for the New England 
States. 

In 1879 he was commissioned by Governor 
Talbot as Chief of the State Police, and when 
that department was reorganized he was reap- 
pointed by Governor Long. He has since 
held office under Governors Robinson, Ames, 
Russell, Greenhalge, and Wolcott, the official 
term being for three years. Under his su- 
pervision the department force has been in- 
creased from three to forty-five officers, and 
its importance and usefulness has been fully 
demonstrated by the amount of work ac- 
complished. It is divided into five subde- 
partments, which include the detective, the 
inspection of the plans and methods of heating 
public buildings, the inspection of factories, 
the inspection of tenement houses, the inspec- 
tion. of uninsured steam boilers, and the exam- 
ination of engineers and firemen who have 
charge of them. The department of State 
police is exceedingly efficient, and many of 
the laws which have aided in its perfection 
were 'enacted by the legislature from sugges- 
tions made in Chief Wade's annual reports. 
The code of inspection laws now in force in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Massachusetts covers a wider latitude than 
those of any other State in the Union, and it 
is used as a guide by other States in revising 
their laws. The department is not only ap- 
preciated at home, but its reputation has pen- 
etrated foreign countries, as is attested by the 
letters of inquiry from abroad, which are fre- 
quently received by its Chief. 

Mr. Wade, after serving as president of the 
International Association of Factory Inspec- 
tors of North America for six years, was again 
elected in 1897, and still holds the position. 
In financial circles he is known as president 
of the Cambridge Co-operative Bank of Cam- 
bridge. This is the third organization of its 
kind to be established in Massachusetts, and 
he has been its official head for nineteen con- 
secutive years. Politically, he is a Republi- 
can, and for eleven years was president and 
secretary of the Middlesex County Committee. 
He is connected with King Solomon Lodge, 
F. & A. M., of Boston, and is a charter 
member of Hugh de Payens Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Melrose. He was one 
of the original founders and the first secretary 
of the Middlesex Club. He is an attendant of 
the Third Universalist Church, Somerville, 
and is moderator of the society. His hand- 
some residence on Chandler Street occupies 
one of the most desirable locations in the 
city. 

In 1849 Mr. Wade was united in marriage 
with Mary A. Marsh, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary A. Marsh, of Hingham, Mass. Mrs. 
Wade died March 23, 1895. 



/^HESTER WELLINGTON CURTIS, 
I St-^ City Marshal of Marlboro, son of 
V^^^^^ Francis C. and Caroline A. (Brig- 
ham) Curtis, was born April 29, 
1862, in the town of Dudley, Worcester 
County, his father's birthplace. He is a de- 
scendant of an old Colonial family, the immi- 
grant progenitor of which arrived in Salem, 
Mass., in 1635, and settled in Topsfield. A 
later ancestor was John Curtis, who was born 
in Dudley, Mass. He served in the Conti- 
nental army during the struggle for indepen- 
dence, and the rest of his life was spent upon 
a farm in his native town. 



Chester Curtis, son of John, was born in 
Dudley in 1794, and succeeded to the owner- 
ship and occupation of the homestead. He 
married Lucinda Willis, of Charlton, Mass., 
and was the father of nine children, seven of 
whom attained adult age, namely: Melissa, 
widow of Charles E. Kimball, late of South- 
bridge, Mass.; Lucian W. Curtis, M.D., of 
the same town; Louisa; John E., who is no 
longer living; Henry C, a resident of Marl- 
boro, Mass. ; Mary, who is no longer living; 
and Francis Chester, of Marlboro. Louisa, 
who married William Richardson for her first 
husband and John Kelley for her second, is 
now residing in Cleveland, Ohio. Chester 
Curtis was a member of the Congregational 
church, and for a number of years was a 
Deacon. 

Francis Chester Curtis, father of Chester 
W., was born in Dudley, March 13, 1836. 
At the age of eighteen, after obtaining a dis- 
trict-school education, he came to Marlboro, 
where he was employed in the shoe manufac- 
tories until i860. Returning to Dudley, he 
was engaged in farming upon land adjoining 
the Curtis homestead until 1862, when he en- 
listed as a private in Company E, First Mas- 
sachusetts Heavy Artillery. He was sta- 
tioned in Washington until 1864, when his 
regiment was called into action at Spottsyl- 
vania Turnpike, and later participated in the 
battle of Cold Harbor and the siege of Peters- 
burg. He was taken by the Confederates on 
June 22 of the same year; and during his cap- 
tivity, which lasted several months, he was 
confined in Libby, Belle Isle, Danville, An- 
dersonville, Millen, Blackshear, and Thomas- 
ville Prisons. He was honorably discharged 
August 16, 1865, and after his return from the 
South he engaged in the meat and provision 
business in Marlboro. Later on he became 
associated with his brother, Henry C, under 
the firm name of F. C. & H. C. Curtis; and 
this concern conducted a large business until 
1895, when it was dissolved. Since 1881 he 
has carried on a dairy farm, to which he is 
now giving his entire attention, keeping 
twenty-five cows and supplying a large num- 
ber of regular customers with milk. 

He is vice-president of the Marlboro Co- 
operative Bank, and has been a trustee of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Savings Bank for several years. Politically, 
he is a Republican. In 1874, 1875, 1889, 
i8go, and 1891, he was Representative to the 
legislature; and while a member of that body 
he served upon the Committees on Mercantile 
Affairs and Public Charities. In 1879 and 
1880 he served as a Selectman under the town 
government, and in 1891 and 1892 he was a 
member of the Board of Aldermen. He is a 
Past Commander of John A. Rawlins Post, 
No. 43, G. A. R. He is an active member of 
the Congregational church, and has served as 
Deacon and as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school for some years. 

Francis C. Curtis married Caroline A. 
Brigham, of Marlboro, and has three children, 
namely: Ciiester W., the subject of this 
sketch; Harry W. ; and Mary A., wife of 
Charles S. Foster, of Pawtucket, R.I. 

Chester Wellington Curtis completed his 
course of study at the Marlboro High School 
in 1880, and for one and a half years after his 
graduation was engaged in the manufacture of 
shoes. He was subsequently in the express 
business for the same length of time, and, 
then entering the employ of Curtis Brothers 
in the provision business, he remained with 
them until February, 1894, when he was ap- 
pointed City Marshal. As head of the 
police department he has demonstrated his ex- 
ecutive ability and efficiency in preserving 
order and enforcing the city ordinances. Mr. 
Curtis was formerly connected with Company 
F, Sixth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia, in which he rose to the rank of Cap- 
tain. He is a member' of United Brethren 
Lodge, F. & A. M.; and he attends the Uni- 
tarian church. 

Mr. Curtis , married Anna R. Theobald, 
daughter of George Theobald, of Boston. 



^HINEAS LAWRENCE, a prosperous 
farmer of Waltham, was born in that 
city, August 19, 1826, son of Jacob 
and Hannah (Brown) Lawrence. His 
ancestors on both sides were among the ear- 
liest settlers of Watertown, Mass. On the 
father's side he is descended from John Law- 
rence, a native of England, who after his 
arrival in America settled in Watertown, and 



was admitted as a freeman in 1635. Follow- 
ing him in regular line of descent came: 
George,- born in Watertown in 1637; George,' 
born in Watertown in 1668; John,'' born in 
Watertown in 1703; Phineas.s born in Wal- 
tham in 1749, eleven years after the incor- 
poration of the town; and Jacob,'' born in 
Waltham in 1792. The mother's family is 
traced to Abraham Brown, who was born and 
married in England. He also settled in 
Watertown on coming to this country, and in 
1631 became the first admitted freeman of 
Watertown. The line of descent from him is 
traced through Jonathan,^ born in 1635 ; Will- 
iam, ' Selectman of Waltham, born in 1684; 
Ebenezer,'' born in 1705; Jonas.s born in 
1729; Jonas,'' born in 1767; and Hannah,^ 
born in 1795, who was the mother of Mr. 
Lawrence. 

Although the ancestors of Mr. Lawrence 
were never politicians in the modern sense of 
the term, and rarely, if ever, sought office, 
they were frequently called upon to fill posi- 
tions of trust, both of a civil and religious 
character. George Lawrence ' was Assessor of 
Waltham in 1738, the year of the town's in- 
corporation, and for four years thereafter. 
Phineass was Selectman from 1781 to 1786 
and a Deacon in the church. During the 
Revolutionary War he performed military ser- 
vice for four days about the time of the 
battle of Lexington. Lydia, the third child 
of Abraham Brown, who was one of the first 
settlers of Watertown, was the first person 
baptized in that town. Abraham was very 
influential in town affairs. By profession a 
land surveyor and engineer, he, in association 
with Robert Seeley, was appointed to survey 
the lots of land granted to the first settlers. 
He was Selectman of Watertown from 1636 to 
1643 inclusive. William Brown ' was very 
often intrusted both with municipal and church 
affairs, and a member of the first Board of 
Selectmen of the town of Waltham. Eben- 
ezer ■* was a Selectman and Assessor. Jonas ^ 
was Assessor, Selectman in 1802 and for sev- 
eral years after; and because of his financial 
ability he was often chosen clerk of the 
boards on which he served. 

Jacob Lawrence, father of Phineas, was born 
June II, 1792, in the red house that still 




PHINEAS LAWRENCE, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



stands on the Trapelo Road in Waltham. He 
carried on general farming throughout the 
greater part of his life, adding some tracts of 
land to the farm, which originally contained 
one hundred acres. He also cut logs for ship 
timber. His marriage with Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Jonas Brown, of Waltham, was per- 
formed May IS, 1817. Of their eight 
children, six sons and two daughters, seven 
were reared, and four are living. The latter 
reside on the old homestead. The father 
died in his ninetieth year, and the mother at 
the age of eighty-one. He was a soldier in 
the War of 1812. 

Having received his education in the public 
schools of Waltham, Phineas Lawrence turned 
his attention to general farming, which he has 
followed successfully up to the present time. 
In politics a Republican, he served on the 
Board of Aldermen in 1885 and 1886, the first 
two years after the incorporation of Waltham 
as a city, thereby resembling his ancestor, 
William Brown, who was a member of the 
town's first Board of Selectmen. From 1887 
to 1892 he was chairman of the Board of 
License Commissioners. He has also been 
a contributor to the local journals, notably 
among his papers or writings being "Trapelo, 
Past and Present," a series of articles histori- 
cally descriptive of the part of the city in 
which he resides, which have often been re- 
ferred to and quoted from as authority. He 
has also furnished numerous articles both on 
agriculture and floriculture, of which latter 
subject he is quite an enthusiast. He is an 
esteemed member of the Unitarian church of 
Waverley. Mr. Lawrence has never married. 
A well-read, intelligent man, he has illustrated 
what may be accomplished in the way of prac- 
tical success in life without the aid of a col- 
lege education. He is now living a quiet, 
retired life at his home on Trapelo Road in 
Waltham. 



T^OLONEL LYMAN DIKE, owner of 
I \y the well-known Marble Ridge Farm, 
^|ls^^ Stoneham, and an ex-member of the 
Massachusetts legislature, was born 
in this town, August 24, 1821, son of Jesse and 
Elizabeth (Willey) Dike. His grandfather, 



Calvin Dike, who was a native of Woodstock, 
Vt., came to Massachusetts, and occupied a 
farm situated near Spot Pond, in the south- 
western part of Stoneham. He married Abi- 
gail Holden; and Jesse, Colonel Dike's 
father, was their only child. 

Jesse Dike was born in Stoneham, January 
2, 1785, and spent his entire life in the vicin- 
ity of his birthplace. He followed the shoe- 
maker's trade during his active period, and 
died in i860, aged seventy -five years. Eliza- 
beth Willey, his wife, who was a daughter of 
Nathan Willey, became the mother of nine 
children, four of whom are living and are resi- 
dents of Stoneham, namely: Lyman, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Charles C. ; Elizabeth; 
and Lorinda. Charles C. Dike married for 
his first wife Harriet Woodward, and his pres- 
ent wife was Susan Nason. His sisters, 
Elizabeth and Lorinda, are both widows. 
The other children of Jesse and Elizabeth 
Dike were: Alfred; George W. ; Solon; Na- 
thaniel D.; and Adeline, who was the wife of 
Thomas H. Lyon. 

Lyman Dike was educated in public and 
private schools, and in his youth he learned 
the shoemaker's trade. At the age of eigh- 
teen he entered mercantile business with his 
brother, George W. Dike, and in 1843 he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of shoes with Alfred 
J. Rhodes. Five years later he withdrew 
from that firm in order to embark in the same 
line with his brother. Together they con- 
ducted both mercantile and manufacturing 
business until 1855; and after that Colonel 
Dike continued in business alone until his re- 
tirement, which took place about ten years 
ago. Since 1888 he has devoted his exclusive 
attention to his real estate interests. Marble 
Ridge Farm, which is located in the south- 
west part of the town, contains a marble 
quarry that was worked over two hundred 
years ago. Much of the land was originally 
inferior, but Colonel Dike has brought it up 
to a high state of cultivation. He erected his 
present residence near the Stoneham railway 
station in 1845. He formerly kept an average 
of seventy cows, and dealt extensively in milk, 
but of late he has reduced his stock, and leases 
a part of his farm to Captain D. T. Strange, of 
Stoneham, for market gardening purposes. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Colonel Dike cast his first Presidential vote 
for James K. Polk in 1844, and, joining the 
Republican party at its formation, has since 
been active in its support. He has served as 
a Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer of the 
Poor, was Representative to the legislature in 
i860, was special County Commissioner for 
nineteen years, and chairman of the Board of 
Health. He is now chairman of the Water 
Commission, has been Justice of the Peace 
since 1S51, is a Notary Public, and has been 
a member of the Republican Town Committe'e 
for many years. In the State militia he 
ranked as Colonel, and during the general en- 
campment of the State troops at Concord in 
1859 he commanded a brigade. In the early 
stages of the Rebellion he offered to raise a 
regiment of colored recruits; but, when the 
proposition was communicated to the War De- 
partment by Governor Andrew, it was de- 
clined. When the second call for disciplined 
men was issued, his regiment was the first 
outside of Boston to report at headquarters. 
Colonel Dike is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and in his younger days he served as 
foreman and treasurer of the General Worth 
Engine Company in the Stoneham fire depart- 
ment. 

Colonel Dike married Eliza G. Wiley, 
daughter of Captain William and Sarah 
(Gerry) Wiley. She observed her seventy- 
sixth birthday on June 10, 1897. Colonel 
and Mrs. Dike have two daughters — Sarah J. 
and Cora E. Sarah J. married Daniel S. 
Davis, of Acton, Mass., and has two children 
— Ethel B. and Elsie C. Miss Cora E. Dike 
lives at home with her parents. 



fAMES F. HATHAWAY, president of 
the Sprague & Hathaway Company, 
portrait artists and solar printers, 
dealers in picture frames, easels, etc., 
at Somerville, was born in Sutton, Worcester 
County, Mass., October i, 1847, son of Ben- 
jamin and Mary (Foster) Hathaway. The 
Hathaway family is of old Puritan stock; and 
probably most of those bearing the name in 
New England, as well as many elsewhere in 
the United States, are descended from John 



Hathaway, who came from England, and set- 
tled in Boston in 1637. 

James F. Hathaway belongs to the tenth 
generation of the family in this country. His 
ancestors took a prominent part in the war of 
the Revolution, his great-grandfather, Major 
Joshua Hathaway, serving all through the 
war. He is also a direct descendant, on his 
grandmother's side, of John Hicks, who was 
killed on Cambridge Common in the retreat of 
the British from Lexington, April 19, 1775. 
There is a monument to Hicks's memory in 
the old church-yard at Harvard Square; and 
his old house is still standing on Dunster 
Street, one of the historical landmarks of 
Cambridge. 

Mr. Hathaway, like most country boys, 
was educated in the common schools of his na- 
tive town. His father was engaged in the 
shoe business; and at the early age of thirteen 
years he left school to learn this trade, which 
he followed until he was twenty-seven years of 
age. Not enjoying good health at that time, 
his physician advised a change of business, 
and suggested some light occupation out of 
doors in the open air; and he therefore took 
up canvassing for pictures for the time being, 
not expecting to follow it for more than a 
brief period. He was successful in this new 
venture from the start; and his orders accumu- 
lated so fast that he found it impossible for 
the concern of C. S. Harley & Co., of Arling- 
ton, Mass., for whom he was canvassing, with 
its meagre facilities to fill them as fast as re- 
quired. This caused him much annoyance, 
and he determined to go into the business of 
making the pictures himself. In 1875 he as- 
sociated himself with W. D. Sprague. They 
procured a photographic outfit, and employed 
two artists, opening up for business at the 
corner of Beach Street and Harrison Avenue, 
Boston, Mass., in two small rooms. This was 
the modest beginning of a house that is now 
the most extensive of its kind in the world. 
The Boston quarters soon became too small to 
accommodate their rapidly growing business; 
and in 1877 the firm removed to the Holland 
Street Building, West Somerville. The 
business, continuing to expand, was becoming 
well known throughout the country and in 
many other countries. A large amount of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



money had been expended in advertising, and 
there were few in this line of industry in the 
world that had not heard of the house in some 
way. In 1886, the business having outgrown 
the old quarters, it became necessary to en- 
large all its departments; and it was to pro- 
vide increased facilities that the Studio Build- 
ing in Davis Square was built. At the time 
of the erection of this building it was expected 
it would accommodate the prospective business 
for all time to come; but within three years 
it had outgrown the large quarters, and the 
only solution of the problem seemed to be 
the erection of another large building. To 
construct a suitable one, and equip the plant 
with- all modern conveniences, required the 
expenditure of a large amount of money; and 
it was deemed necessary to organize a stock 
company, which was done in 1890. Mr. 
Hathaway was elected president of the com- 
pany, which position he now holds (1898). 

Mr. Hathaway was brought very promi- 
nently before the public in 1897 by his con- 
test with the city of Somerville over the pay- 
ment of a tax of about eleven hundred dollars 
on personal property that he did not possess at 
the time the tax was assessed. Rather than 
submit to so great an injustice, he went to 
East Cambridge jail, where he was confined 
for three days. Public opinion, as well as 
the press of the whole country, was almost 
wholly on his side. Though the city was 
right from a legal standpoint, public senti- 
ment did not approve of its action in the 
matter; and it was compelled to abandon the 
collection of the tax. Mr. Hathaway is the 
only man that was committed to jail under 
this law, and he is deserving of credit for the 
stand he took in the matter for the sake of 
principle rather than for the money involved. 
Few men would go to jail for the sake of 
exposing the injustice of our tax laws and 
their harshness of administration. His course 
in this affair was very warmly commended by 
the press and the public generally. 

Mr. Hathaway married Miss Bertha B. 
Sprague, of East Douglas, Mass., June 11, 
1879, and has no other family. He is a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows and of the Masonic 
fraternity, as well as various other organiza- 
tions. 



ULIAN A. MEAD, M.D., chairman 
of the Watertown Board of Health and 
surgeon at the United States Arsenal 
at Watertown, was born in Acton, 
., April 15, 1856, son of Oliver W. and 
(Hartwell) Mead. His grandfather, 
Nathaniel Mead, a native of Boxboro, Mass., 
passed the greater part of his life as an indus- 
trious farmer in Acton, where he died at an 
advanced age. He married a Miss Taylor, 
and was the father of eight children, of whom 
Oliver W. was the fourth-born. Seven are 
now living; namely, Adelbert, Varnum, 
Oliver W., Mary, Fanny, Ann, and Susan. 

Oliver W. Mead, Dr. Mead's father, was 
born in Boxboro, and in early life engaged in 
the produce business in Boston. For the past 
fifty years he has been a member of the firm 
of A. & O. VV. Mead, well known in the 
market districts of Boston as one of the larg- 
est produce concerns in New England, and 
he stands high in the estimation of his busi- 
ness associates, among whom he has long oc- 
cupied a leading position. He resides in 
Acton, and is still actively engaged in busi- 
ness. In politics he supports the Republican 
party. His wife, Mary Hartwell Mead, be- 
came the mother of four children, of whom 
two are living, namely: Julian A., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Emma A., who is the 
wife of George Sumner Wright, of Water- 
town, and the mother of two children — War- 
ren M. and Margaret. Mrs. Oliver W. Mead 
died in 1866. She was a member of the Con- 
gregational church. 

Julian A. Mead resided in Acton until he 
was thirteen years old. He attended school 
in Concord, Mass., for one year, after which 
he prepared for his collegiate course at 
Phillips Exeter Academy, and was graduated 
from Harvard University with the class of 
1878. After pursuing the regular course at 
the Harvard University Medical School, he 
spent some time in Vienna, Leipzig, and 
Paris, perfecting his professional studies; and 
in 1883 he located in Watertown, where he 
has since found ample opportunities for prac- 
tice. He has met with gratifying success 
both as a physician and surgeon, and he ranks 
among the leading practitioners in this local- 
ity. Politically, he acts with the Republican 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



party, and for ten years was chairman of the 
School Board. He is at the present time 
chairman of the Board of Health, has been 
Medical Examiner of the district since 1884, 
is surgeon at the United States Arsenal, mem- 
ber of the State Board of Health, and has been 
a trustee of the Watertown Public Library for 
the past six years. 

On December 12, 1889, Dr. Mead was 
united in marriage with Mary D. Emerson, 
daughter of D. R. Emerson, of Newton, 
Mass. The Doctor attends the Unitarian 
church, and Mrs. Mead is an Episcopalian. 
They stand high in the social circles of 
Watertown. 



T^HARLES G. FOSTER, a former 
I SX Postmaster of Burlington, was a na- 
^^^U five of Boston, born November 6, 

1818. He was a representative of 
an old Boston family, the descendants of the 
Rev. John Foster, a native of Lincolnshire, 
England, who was among the original 
founders of that city. The Fosters were for 
several generations prominent residents of the 
North End. Both the father and grandfather 
of Charles G. were named Thomas, and were 
lifelong residents of Boston. The former, 
who was a ship-carpenter and house builder, 
lived to be eighty years old. 

Charles G. Foster was educated in the Bos- 
ton public schools. When his studies were 
completed he learned the trade of a copper- 
smith. Being naturally studious, his leisure 
hours were devoted to study, by which he ac- 
quired educational attainments that enabled 
him to relinquish his trade and become a 
book-keeper. In 1859 he bought a farm in 
Burlington, to which he moved his family. 
Residing here for the rest of his life, he was 
identified with the town's public business dur- 
ing the greater part of that period. He was 
Town Auditor for over thirty years, served as 
chairman of the School Board from 1862 until 
1894, when he resigned on account of ill 
health, and for a number of years he was a 
member of the Library Committee. In 1881 
he was appointed Postmaster, and afterward 
held that office until 1895, when he was suc- 
ceeded by his daughter, Eleanor S. 



Mr. Foster married Elizabeth W. Akerman, 
who was born in Portsmouth, N.H., June 21, 
1 818, daughter of Samuel Akerman, of that 
city. She became the mother of five children 
— Eleanor S., Charles Henry, Ada Went- 
worth, Henry Akerman, and Annie Louise. 
Of these three are living. The members of 
the family are Spiritualists. Mr. Foster 
was an honorary member of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery and the City Guards of 
Boston. He died at his home in Burlington, 
September 6, 1896. 



ANFORD HARRISON DUDLEY, 
A.M., LL. B., was born in China, 
Kennebec County, Me., on the four- 
teenth day of January, 1842. His 
parents were Harrison and Elizabeth (Pren- 
tiss) Dudley, and both were also born in China, 
Me. On his father's side Mr. Dudley was de- 
scended in the direct line from Thomas Dud- 
ley, one of the founders of Boston and New 
England, who landed at Naumkeag, now 
Salem, Mass., from the "Arbella" in 1630, 
with Sir Richard Saltonstall, Winthrop, and 
others, and bore well his part in the building 
of the new Commonwealth. He was a man of 
great wisdom, sturdy and unbending in what 
he deemed to be right, but very ready to 
admit an error when he found himself in 
error; somewhat impolitic in dealing with 
men of differing minds and principles by 
reason of his devotion to what he deemed to 
be right, yet beloved by those he sometimes 
sharply opposed, by reason of his acknowledged 
uprightness, as witness the encomiums heaped 
on him by his political opponent. Governor 
Winthrop. He was always in high office, 
several times Governor, alternating with Win- 
throp on several occasions. Mr. Dudley 
takes his descent through the Rev. Samuel 
Dudley, the eldest son of Governor Dudley, 
who moved to Exeter, N.H., and there died, 
leaving a large family, some of whose de- 
scendants became pioneers in Maine. Mr. 
Dudley's great-grandfather was one of them. 

On his mother's side Mr. Dudley is de- 
scended from Valentine Prentiss, his great- 
grandfather, a veteran of the Revolutionary 
War, who fought at Bunker Hill, and was re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



warded by a grant of land in the then District 
of Maine, where he afterward settled. 

Mr. Dudley's early years were spent as 
farmers' boys usually spend them, picking 
up what education he could in the district 
school, and roaming the fields and forests 
when not engaged in more serious occupation. 
At this time he lived at St. Albans, Me. 
Later successively he lived at Auburn and 
Richmond, Me., and it was here that he began 
to think more seriously of what education he 
ought to seek. About the year 1858 his par- 
ents moved to Fairhaven, Mass., and here for 
the first time he had the opportunity of begin- 
ning the study of the classics in the high 
school, then taught by Charles P. Rugg, who 
afterward for many years was master of the 
New Bedford High School, and then became a 
member of the legislature from New Bedford 
for a number of years, where he rose to emi- 
nence and influence. It was Mr. Dudley's 
good fortune to continue with Mr. Rugg the 
happy intimacy of pupil and teacher when 
later he became Mr. Rugg's submaster in the 
New Bedford High School on his graduation 
from Harvard in 1867. As a pupil in the 
high school in Fairhaven, Mr. Dudley began 
to prepare himself as best he could for col- 
lege. After a variety of ups and downs in his 
studies, both there and in New Bedford, where 
he afterward moved, teaching a district school 
in winters and engaging in other occupations 
at other times, he succeeded in entering Har- 
vard College in 1863, graduating there- 
from with his class of 1867. After a period 
of three years as submaster in the New Bed- 
ford High School, as previously intimated, 
meanwhile studying at his chosen profession 
at odd moments and as he could in the office 
of Eliot & Stetson, eminent lawyers in Bris- 
tol County, he resigned his position at the 
end of the school year of 1869 and 1870, and 
thereafter gave himself wholly to the study of 
the law at Harvard Law School, where he 
graduated, taking the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1871. After a short apprenticeship 
in the office of James Bailey Richardson, now 
(1898) an Associate Justice of the Superior 
Court, and after admission to the bar in the 
Supreme Judicial Court Ln July, 1871, before 
the Hon. James D. Colt, presiding Justice, 



Mr. Dudley began the serious and active prac- 
tice of the law in Boston, where he has been 
ever since. For a number of years he main- 
tained an office at Harvard Square, Cambridge, 
where he met his clients in the morning and 
evening. 

While yet a teacher, in the New Bedford 
High School, Mr. Dudley was married to 
Laura Nye Howland, eldest daughter of John 
M. Howland, of Fairhaven. They were mar- 
ried April 2, 1869, at Fairhaven, by the Rev. 
Courtland Y. De Normandie. From her 
father Mrs. Dudley takes descent from the 
Pilgrims of the "Mayflower," and from her 
mother, from the Folgers of Nantucket. 

Three children have blessed their married 
life: an only son, Howland, of the class of 
1S95, Harvard University, and 1S98 of the 
Harvard Law School ; two daughters, Laura 
Howland, Radcliffe 1895, and Elizabeth 
Prentiss, a student at Radcliffe. 

Mr. Dudley has devoted himself assiduously 
to his profession, and has never sought politi- 
cal honors or service, though he was a member 
of his city government for a single year in 
1 880. 

He has not hesitated, however, to do his 
share of the duties belonging to a good citi- 
zen in shaping public opinion in political, re- 
ligious, and social life. He has at times 
taken an active part iu all these lines. He is 
one of the original members of the Cambridge 
Club, one of the oldest and most influential 
clubs or social organizations in the country. 
Cambridge is well known all over the world 
for its famous educational institutions and as 
the home of Harvard University; but it is 
only less known for the purity and thorough- 
ness of its city polity and politics. For this, 
to a very large degree, it is indebted to the 
Cambridge Club, As a social organization 
the Cambridge Club has become unique in 
this regard; and its one hundred men, as a 
picked and representative body of citizens of 
Cambridge, have had much to do in devising 
and shaping that influence in civic and polit- 
ical life in Cambridge which has finally come 
to be designated by its friends and admirers 
as the "Canibridge idea." 

For many years Mr. Dudley has worshipped 
at the Third Universalist Church in Cam- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bridge, is a member of the Universalist Club 
in Boston, and for a term of two years was its 
president. He has taken an active interest in 
the affairs of his denomination, and borne his 
part in the responsibilities of church and de- 
nominational management. 

He is still in the active practice of his pro- 
fession at 95 Milk Street, Boston, in the same 
office occupied by him for nearly twenty years. 



§AMES THEODORE ALLEN, associ- 
ate principal of the English and Class- 
ical School at Newton, Mass., with 
which he has been connected some 
thirty-seven years, was born in Medfield, Nor- 
folk County, Mass., August 29, 1831. His 
parents were Ellis and Lucy (Lane) Allen. 
His immigrant ancestor, James Allen, who 
was born in England, located in Dedham, 
Mass., in 1637, and in 1649 made a settle- 
ment on the Charles River, near Medfield. 
He was the first of thirteen proprietors who 
held grants of land in and about Medfield. 
James Allen married Ann Gould in 1638. 
Eight generations of Aliens have been born 
on the old place in Medfield, which is still 
in the possession of the family. 

Phineas Allen, James T. Allen's grand- 
father, who was a native of Medfield, was a 
Revolutionary soldier. He died in 1-836. 
His wife was Ruth Smith, of Walpol^. 
Their son, Ellis Allen, the father named 
above, was born in Medfield in September, 
1792, and spent his life there, dying in 1875, 
a well-to-do farmer. He was married in 1814 
to Lucy Lane, who was born in 1793, and 
died in 1889. They had a family of eight 
children, of whom four sons and a daughter 
are living. 

James Theodore Allen graduated from the 
Bridgewater State Normal School in 1850. 
He taught two winters before he began his 
course of study there; during the winter of 
1847 taking charge of a school in Easton, in 
1849 teaching at South Natick, and from 1851 
to 1853 in Provincetown, Mass. In April, 
1853, he entered the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, Troy, N.Y. ; and, graduating in 
185s, he was immediately appointed professor 
of English at the Institute, and rector of the 



training-school connected with it. Three 
years later he resigned, in order to make a 
special study of the languages; and, his health 
failing, he travelled in Europe in 1859-60, 
visiting Germany, Sweden, Norway, Den- 
mark, France, the Netherlands, Greece, Tur- 
key, and Egypt and the Holy Land. In i860 
he became connected with the English and 
Classical School at West Newton, Mass. In 
1872-74 he again visited Europe, and studied 
Latin, Greek, and German in Germany, this 
special training making him a language teacher 
of unusual excellence. He teaches mathemat- 
ics and the higher classics, fitting pupils for 
Harvard. Mr. Allen is a member of the 
American Institute of Instruction and of the 
Massachusetts Teachers' Association. He is 
interested in the national movement of spell- 
ing reform. 

He was married in August, i860, to Caro- 
line A., daughter of Dr. E. A. Kittredge, of 
Lynn, Mass., and their union has been 
blessed by four children: Edward E., born in 
1861 ; Frederick C, born in 1865; Jennie 
Clark, born in 1866; and Annie K., born in 
1873. Edward E. Allen was fitted for college 
at the Allen School, and was graduated at 
Harvard in 1884. He has also studied in 
Germany. He is now principal of the Penn- 
sylvania Institute for the Blind in Philadel- 
phia. He married Miss Catherine Gibbs, of 
Westfield, Mass. Frederick C. Allen was 
educated at the Allen School and the Agri- 
cultural College at Amherst, Mass., and is 
now cashier for George H. Morrill & Co., of 
New York City. He married Miss Charlotte 
Jukes, of New York. Jennie Clark Allen, 
after attending the Allen School, studied four 
years in Germany. She is now teacher of 
instrumental music in the Allen School. 
Annie K. Allen, who was born in Leipzig, 
Germany, was educated in the Allen School 
and at Smith College, graduating from the 
latter institution in the class of 1895. She 
is with her parents. The Allen School, 
which was founded by Nathaniel T. Allen, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume, was the first in New England to in- 
troduce gymnastics and the first in the coun- 
try to introduce the kindergarten system. Dr. 
Dio Lewis was the earliest instructor in gym- 




JAMES T. ALLEN 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



nasties, and Miss Louise Pollock, now prin- 
cipal of the National Froebel Kindergarten 
Normal Institute at Washington, D. C, the 
first teacher of kindergarten work. The school 
is strictly non-sectarian. 

Mr. Allen was treasurer of the Republican 
Ward and City Committee for eight years, and 
Alderman from Ward Three in 1896-97, hav- 
ing been elected in 1895. He is a member of 
the Republican Club of Massachusetts, the 
Massachusetts Schoolmasters' Club, and the 
Newton Republican Club; and he belongs, 
also, to the Home Market Club and the Web- 
ster Historical Society of Boston. 



W: 



XLIAM HENRY WHITNEY, a 
well-known civil engineer of Bos- 
ton, resident in Cambridge, was 
born in Cambridge, Mass., January 3, 1843, 
son of Charles and Caroline Fuller Whit- 
ney. He comes of an old New England fam- 
ily, being a descendant in the eighth genera- 
tion of John' and Elinor Whitney, of Ipswich, 
England, who came to America, sailing from 
London in 1635, and settled in Watertown, 
Massachusetts Colony. They were the par- 
ents of nine children — Mary, John, Richard, 
Nathaniel, Thomas, Jonathan, Joshua, Caleb, 
and Benjamin. John,= the ne.xt in line of de- 
scent, was fifteen years old (or, as some au- 
thorities say, eleven) when he accompanied 
his parents to this country. He was their 
eldest son, and had attended the Merchant 
Tailors' School in London for four years be- 
fore making the voyage to New England. He 
and his brothers, Richard and Thomas, were 
subsequently admitted freemen of Watertown. 
In 1642 he married Ruth Reynolds, and the 
following year he established a home of his 
own on a three-acre lot located not far from 
his father's farm. In common with most of 
the pioneer settlers he, with his father and 
seven brothers, spent much time in the work 
of felling the forest and clearing their farm. 
Their arduous labor, however, was not unre- 
lieved by healthful recreation. Fish and 
game abounded, and rod and gun were in fre- 
quent requisition to keep the larder well sup- 
plied and equal to the demands of the large 
family. There was also a county and town 



bounty for wolves, foxes, and blackbirds. 
The duty of bearing and practising the use of 
arms was further emphasized by the liability 
at any time to an attack from hostile savages. 
In such warfare Watertown men had frequent 
and stern experience. In April, 1676, John 
Whitney was called from his farm and im- 
pressed by colony order to join Captain Hugh 
Mason's command of forty men to go to the 
relief of the Sudbury garrison houses, then in- 
vested by a band of a thousand Indians. At 
that time he was Selectman, in which ofifice he 
served again after the interval of a year. He 
had ten children — John, Ruth, Nathaniel, 
Samuel, Mary, Joseph, Sarah, Elizabeth, 
Hannah, and Benjamin. Benjamin Whit- 
ney,^ born in 1660, youngest son of John and 
Ruth (Reynolds) Whitney, by his father's 
will, probated in 1692, received a portion of 
the estate, to which he added by purchase sev- 
eral acres adjoining. He married March 30, 
1687, Abigail Hagar, by whom he had two 
daughters and four sons; namely, Abigail, 
Benjamin, Ruth, John, David, and Daniel. 
All of the sons settled in Watertown or 
Waltham. Benjamin Whitney, with five 
other Watertown Whitneys, served in the 
Narragansett Indian War in 1676, at which 
time he was but sixteen years old, and also in 
Sir William Phipps's expedition against Can- 
ada in 1690. The date of his death has not 
been ascertained. 

John Whitney, •* the eldest son of Benjamin, 
was a blacksmith by occupation. He married 
about 1729, when he was thirty-five years old, 
and by his wife, Susan, had ten children; 
namely, Susannah, John, Jonathan, Amos, 
Abraham, Moses, Ezekiel, Stephen, Aaron, 
and Ruth. Four of his sons served in the 
Revolutionary War in the Watertown com- 
pany. He died in 1776. 

Abraham Whitney, s fifth child of John and 
Susan, was born in October, 1735. He mar- 
ried July 10, 1766, Elizabeth, daughter of Jo- 
seph Whitney, and there were four children — 
Abraham, Elizabeth, Lois (born 1770 or 
1 77 1), and Joshua. Lois was about twenty- 
one months old when their mother died; and 
the father, left with four young children, mar- 
ried soon after (December 3, 1772) Mary 
Mead, a daughter of Joshua and Lucy Mead, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Waltham, and great-grandmother of the 
subject of this sketch. By her he had nine 
children — Moses, Amos, Esther, Elisha, 
Maria, Lydia, Susanna, Lucy, and Mary. 
When the Revolutionary War broke out, Abra- 
ham Whitney was about forty years old and 
the father of three or four young children. 
He responded promptly to the call of patriot- 
ism, and made haste to join the Sons of Lib- 
erty and the minute-men. Near midnight 
on April i8, 1775, he was passing through 
Charlestown on horseback when he met a 
stranger, possibly Paul Revere himself, riding 
rapidly with the news of the British advance 
on Lexington. With courage and prompt- 
ness he at once put spurs to his horse, and 
rode from town to town and from farm to farm, 
calling upon the people to "up and to arm." 
He alarmed Watertown and other Middlesex 
villages, and, it is highly probable, took an 
active part in the repulse of the British 
troops. Subsequently he was among the 
patriotic soldiers on the Heights of Dorches- 
ter, and witnessed the evacuation of Boston 
by the British. It is also probable that he 
served at Saratoga, and saw the surrender of 
Burgoyne, which occurred the year after his 
father's death. 

Amos Whitney,*^ son of Abraham and Mary 
Mead Whitney, was born in 1786. He was a 
paper manufacturer and a member of the firm 
of Kimball & Whitney in Weston. He re- 
sided on Main Street in Waltham. On Janu- 
ary 17, 181 1, he married Martha Priest, who 
was baptized July 4, 1784, and who was a 
daughter of James and Abigail (Lawrence) 
Priest. By her he had four children — 
Charles, Amos, James, and Walter. The 
mother died in i860, and Amos, the father, 
on June 10, 1824. 

Charles Whitney, ^ son of Amos and Martha 
and father of William Henry, the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Waltham, February 
II, 1812. He was a blacksmith by trade, and 
in later life was foreman in the car shops of 
Davenport & Bridges in Cambridge. He was 
a respected citizen and a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. His death 
occurred July 29, 1850. His wife, whose 
name in maidenhood was Caroline Fuller 
Stimson, was born at Needham, Mass., Au- 



gust 20, 1 8 16, daughter of Jeremiah and Eliz- 
abeth (Fuller) Stimson. They had five chil- 
dren, namely: Charles Edward, born January 
5, 1840, and drowned in the Charles River in 
sight of his home, April 5, i860; William 
Henry, whose name begins this sketch and 
the date of whose nativity has been already 
given; Clara Maria, who was born January 4, 
184S, and died September 29, 1847; Ella 
Caroline, born March 15, 1847, an artist and 
teacher in the Cambridge Training School; 
and Frank Erving, born October 28, 1850, a 
machinist and inventor, who married October 
7, 1880, Isabell E. Billman. 

William Henry Whitney,^ after graduating 
from the Cambridge High School, pursued a 
brief course of study at the Lawrence Scien- 
tific School of Harvard University. He then 
began to study civil engineering in the office 
of Stephen P. and J. Franklin Fuller, of Bos- 
ton. But a year later, on July 14, 1862, he 
enlisted for three years in the United States 
service, and was appointed First Sergeant, 
Company A, Thirty-eighth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He was promoted to Second 
Lieutenant, beginning service as such Febru- 
ary 10, 1863, and to a Captaincy, August 8, 
1864. He received a commission from the 
President as Brevet Major, July 29, 1868, to 
rank as such from March 13, 1865, "for gal- 
lantry in action " at Winchester, Va. , Septem- 
ber 19, 1864. He was honorably discharged 
for disability Deceniber 20, 1864, the same 
resulting from wounds received in action. 
His first service during the war was on picket 
duty at Baltimore. At Antietam he per- 
formed outpost duty. Subsequently he took 
part in General Banks's expedition to the 
Lower Mississippi and New Orleans; the ad- 
vance on Port Hudson (March 8, 1863); the 
Opelousas County and Teche Bayou cam- 
paigns; battle of Bisland; the operations at 
Alexandria, La., and in the Red River 
County; the siege and capture of Port Hud- 
son; the Red River expedition; battles of 
Cane River and Mansura Plains; and (with 
the Army of the Potomac) the Shenandoah 
Valley campaign under Sheridan, and the 
battle of Winchester, Va., September 19, 
1864. In this last-named battle he was left 
with two wounds, at the morning repulse, a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



prisoner in the Confederate line of battle, but 
was rescued in the afternoon victory. Mr. 
Whitney drew a pension for a few months, but 
subsequently surrendered it, and has never 
asked for a renewal. 

His wounds not being serious, his recovery 
was speedy; and in March, 1865, five months 
after his last battle, he resumed his old posi- 
tion in the office of S. P. and J. F. Fuller, 
with whom he remained five years acquiring 
the profession of a civil engineer. In 1869, 
1870, and 1 87 1, he was employed in the city 
engineer's office in Boston, and the year fol- 
lowing he entered into a copartnership with J. 
Franklin Fuller. In a few years he took the 
whole responsibility of the business, and in 
1888 changed the style of Fuller & Whitney to 
William H. Whitney, which it has since re- 
mained. It is largely local in character, and 
includes to a considerable extent the improve- 
ment of Back Bay lands. Mr. Whitney's 
office was for twenty-two years at 39 Court 
Street, but is now at 15 Court Square, Boston. 
In September, 1881, he received a bronze 
medal at the Massachusetts Charitable Me- 
chanics' Association exhibition for sun or blue 
prints. He developed and improved a French 
process, and used it in illustrating the growth 
of Back Bay lands. He issued to subscribers 
monthly schedules and maps, showing the 
changes in ownership, increase of values and 
improvements by filling and other public 
works. He is the author of several papers, 
pamphlets, and other works, of a scientific 
and genealogical character, including the fol- 
lowing: in Cambridge, public documents, 
1879, Sewer Assessments Report; Public 
Gas Supply Report; The Back Bay (Boston), 
1814-90, a set of plans (blue prints), with 
Explanatory Schedules and Statements of 
History and Growth, published from i88i to 
1890, for a part of the time monthly; Union 
and Confederate Campaigns in the Lower 
Shenandoah Valley, illustrated (blue prints of 
maps and text), 1883; "The Men of Cam- 
bridge," a paper read before the Cambridge 
Club, April 20, 1896, at the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of the city's incorporation; "Who car- 
ried the Alarm to Watertown, April 18, 
1775?" a four-page leaflet; and other papers 
relating to the Whitney history and gene- 



alogy, read before the Whitney descendants' 
reunion of 1897. 

Mr. Whitney is a member of the New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society of Boston. 
He also belongs to the Watertown Historical 
Society, the Cambridge Club, Colonial Club, 
the Loyal Legion, and to G. A. R. Post 
No. 30, of Cambridge. He has voted uni- 
formly with the Republican party, with the 
exception of one vote for President Cleve- 
land. In 1 88 1 he was a candidate for Rep- 
resentative to the General Court, but was 
defeated by a small majority. In 1879 ^i^ 
served as Alderman in Cambridge; and he 
was a member of the Board of Health in that 
city from 1886 to 1S93, of which board he was 
also a member and chairman in 1896. At 
the age of fourteen years he joined the First 
Baptist Church in Cambridge, and in 1870 
was engaged with others in starting the Sun- 
day-school, which afterward grew into the 
church at first called the Charles River Bap- 
tist, and now the Immanuel, in Cambridge. 
He became a member of the Brookline Bap- 
tist Church in 1888. While a member, with 
delegates from other churches he formed the 
Sunday-school and church known as the 
Centre Street Baptist Church of Boston. He 
was chosen Deacon of the Brookline church in 
1890, and now holds that office. 

He was married February 18, 1868, to 
Emma Sargent Barbour, daughter of John Na- 
thaniel and Susan (Sargent) Barbour, of Cam- 
bridge, and has four children: Clara Mabel, 
born February 22, 1871; Chester, born June 
29, 1874; Charles Fuller, born January 22, 
1879; ^""^ Alice Emma, born August 4, 
1880. 



']ClLLIOT W. KEYES, a leading druggist 
R and apothecary of Auburndale, was 
'■^~— — ^ born in Weston, Mass., May 18, 
1863, son of James E. and Addie L. (Weston) 
Keyes. The first ancestor of the family in 
America emigrated from England quite early 
in the Colonial period, and settled in Massa- 
chusetts. James E. Keyes, who is a native 
of New Hampshire, born in 1833, has spent 
the greater part of his life in Massachusetts. 
For twenty-five years he was superintendent 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of a lumber yard in Foxboro, where he now 
resides. He has been married three times. 
His wife, Addie L., whose only child is 
Elliot W., and who died in 1863, was a 
daughter of Eri and Emily (Fisk) Weston. 
The Fisk family is one of the oldest and best 
known in the town of Weston. By his third 
union James E. Keyes has one son, Walter 
A. Keyes, who graduated from the Foxboro 
High School in 1885, and from the Univer- 
sity of New York City with the class of 1890, 
and is now a professor at Trinity School, 
New York. 

Elliot W. Keyes graduated from the Fox- 
boro High School in 1882. At the age of 
twenty he entered the drug store of Doolittle 
& Smith, Boston. A short time later he 
came to Auburndale as clerk for C. Sargent 
Bird, with whom he had been three years, 
when he purchased the business. This he has 
since carried on with a varied and complete 
stock, consisting of a select line of goods be- 
longing to medical merchandise, besides fancy 
articles, soaps, perfumes, and toilet requisites 
of a superior quality; while he gives physi- 
cians' prescriptions prompt and careful atten- 
tion. Mr. Keyes is financially interested in a 
Boston concern, conducted under the firm 
name of Thomas E. Mepham & Co., manufact- 
urers of a compound for removing crystalliza- 
tions from the interior of steam boliers. 

Mr. Keyes is a member of Newton Lodge, 
No. 92, I. O. O. F., of West Newton; the 
Recorder of Auburndale Lodge, No. iii, An- 
cient Order of United Workmen; and con- 
nected with the Druggists' Alliance of Bos- 
ton and the Massachusetts State Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist church. In May, 1891, he married Ger- 
trude A. Davenport, daughter of Ralph and 
Evelyn R. (Gilbert) Davenport. His children 
are: Freemont Weston, born in 1892; and 
Ralph Elliot, born in 1895. 



iHARLES ESTY, a well-known market 
gardener of Newton, was born in 
1834 on the old Richard estate in 
Newton, Oak Hill, son of Amos 
and Harriet (Spare) Esty. The father, a na- 
tive of Randolph, born in 1802, followed the 



trade of shoemaker for a time. In later years 
he became foreman at the Amory Farm in 
Milton.' He died in 1887, at the advanced 
age of eighty-five years. His wife, Harriet, 
was a daughter of James Spare, of Boston, and 
a grand-daughter of Hezekiah Barber, who was 
at one time the proprietor of a hotel that for- 
merly stood on the site of the Adams House, 
Boston. Amos and Harriet Esty were the 
parents of three children; namely, Charles, 
Artemas, and Amos. The last two, who 
were twins, are now deceased. 

Charles Esty was educated in the Newton 
schools. He has always worked on a farm, 
and now makes a specialty of market garden- 
ing, selling principally in Boston. In 1865 
he was united in marriage with Emeline, 
daughter of James and Mary Clement, of Ber- 
wick, Me. Three sons have been born to 
them; namely, Herman Clement, Frederic S., 
and James P. Herman Clement, born Octo- 
ber 3, 1866, was educated in the Newton 
schoo-ls. Frederic S., born October 27, 1870, 
was educated in the Newton graded and high 
schools, and is now a member of the Ward 
and City Republican Committees. James P., 
born August i, 1874, completed the course of 
the Newton High School, and has passed the 
examination for admission to the Boston In- 
stitute of Technology. All three sons are at 
home and engaged with their father in raising 
flowers and market gardening. Mr. Esty is a 
Republican in politics. 



§ASPER H. YETTEN, who is carrying 
on a large and profitable express busi- 
ness in Waltham, was born in Jay, 
Me., July 30, 1S64, son of Simon B. 
and Amanda M. (Park) Yetten. His ances- 
tors, who spelled the name Yeaton, were 
early settlers in Portsmouth. The father was 
a merchant in Jay, Me., and for many years 
was prominent in public affairs, having served 
as Town Clerk for a number of terms,- as well 
as in other positions of trust. In politics he 
was originally a Democrat, but supported the 
Greenback party during its existence. He 
died in Jay, January 22, 1882. 

Jasper H. Yetten began his education in 
the public schools of Jay, and completed it at 




JASPER H. YETTEN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Wilton Academy. His business life was 
begun in a grocery story of Gilbertville, Me., 
where he remained for three years. Then 
going to Quincy, Mass., he became connected 
with W. C. Townsend in the wholesale mar- 
ble and granite business. Four years later he 
was sent to Carara, Italy, in the interest of 
that concern, to select and ship marble for 
sculptors' use. During his two years' ab- 
sence he visited the principal cities of Italy, 
examined the quarries where the soft statuary 
marble is cut out in blocks by convict labor, 
and witnessed the modelling and moulding of 
alabaster statuary at Pisa. He also saw 
Mount Vesuvius in action, made trips to dif- 
ferent points on the Mediterranean and Adri- 
atic Seas, including Venice, and passed through 
the Mont Cenis and St. Gothard Tunnels. 
On his way home he stopped in France, Bel- 
gium, Holland, England, and Scotland, and 
sailed from Glasgow to the United States. 
After his return he spent a year at a commer- 
cial college, and in 1891 he came to Waltham. 
Having started in the express business with 
four men and six horses, he now has a force 
of thirty men and forty horses, and has been 
very successful. In 1897 he purchased the 
Hall estate, known as Hall Place, off Newton 
Street. On this he has since erected a large 
four-story storage building, with stables for 
the accommodation of fifty horses. 

Mr. Yetten is a member of Governor Gore 
Lodge, No. 198, I. O. O. F. Politically, he 
is a Republican; and he attends the Baptist 
church. On October 19, 1892, he was joined 
in marriage with Carrie Carlton, daughter of 
Andrew Carlton, of Waltham. His children 
are Le Baron and Lucile. 



ANIEL PROCTOR BYAM, of 
South Chelmsford, a Grand Army 
veteran and a successful dairy 
farmer, was born in his present 
November 8, 1 841, son of Marcus 
and Mary (Proctor) Byam. The 
have been settled in Chelmsford for 
nearly two hundred and fifty years. The pio- 
neer of the family, George Byam, who was in 
Wenham, Mass., in 1640, settled in 1653 in 
Chelmsford. The line of descent is traced 



home, 
Daniel 
Byams 



through George's son Abraham, who married 
Experience Alvord, and their son Isaac, to 
Solomon, who was Daniel P. Byam's grand- 
father. Solomon married Abi Adams, and 
reared seven sons and six daughters, all of 
whom married and had families. Three of the 
sons — Marcus D., Stillman, and S. Edwin — 
had adjoining farms in South Chelmsford. 

Marcus Daniel Byam was born in Chelms- 
ford in 1806. He learned the blacksmith's 
trade of Phineas Chamberlain in Westford, 
and afterward conducted a forge in Chelms- 
ford for forty years, besides managing a large 
farm. While a popular blacksmith, he was a 
stanch Republican; and as he was always 
ready to back his opinions his forge was the 
scene of many a spirited argument. He was 
a supporter of the Baptist church, and was ac- 
tive in starting the subscription for the bell. 
At his death, which happened March 22, 
1878, he was seventy-two years old. The 
first of his two marriages was contracted with 
Rebecca Chamberlain, a sister of Parker 
Chamberlain, who owned the house in 
Chelmsford now occupied by Frank C. Byam. 
She left two children, namely: Laura J., un- 
married, who lives with her half-brother, 
Daniel P. ; and Lysander M., who resides in 
Somerville, Mass. His second wife, in 
maidenhood Mary Proctor, who made her 
home with her only son, Daniel P., lived to 
be ninety-two years old, and was blind during 
the last twelve years of her life. 

Daniel Proctor Byam attended the high 
school in his native town and a business col- 
lege in Springfield. His school days were 
scarcely ended when the Civil War broke out; 
and in August, 1862, he enlisted for nine 
months in the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment. 
During the greater part of his term of service 
he was on provost guard in Suffolk, Va., and 
he took part in one battle, the engagement at 
Carrsville. Receiving his first discharge in 
June, 1863, he enlisted again in March, 1864, 
joining the signal corps of the regular United 
States army. For some time he was in the 
camp of instruction at Georgetown, D.C. 
Thence he started on May 19 of the same year 
for New Orleans, arriving there in July. 
From that time until March, 1865, he was 
drilling. From New Orleans he set out for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mobile, Ala., by way of Pensacola, Fla. ; and 
he was engaged in a cavalry raid in Florida 
and Alabama with General Steele's division. 
The cavalry made a circuit of five hundred 
miles around Mobile, destroying railroads and 
other means of communication. At Meridian, 
Miss., he joined General Canby's command, 
which moved on to Mobile, and there he was 
engaged in signal work when Mobile capitu- 
lated. They followed up the rebels so closely 
that at one time he spent the night in a sig- 
nal station left by a rebel corps the day be- 
fore. He was next sent to Montgomery, Ala., 
and Selma; and after Lee's surrender he was 
in Brownsville, Tex., General Canby's di- 
vision having been sent to watch the French 
and Austrian troops supporting Maximilian. 
In October, 1865, he returned to New Or- 
leans, from which place he travelled to Wash- 
ington in charge of signal stores. These 
being turned over to the department at Wash- 
ington, he received his final discharge Novem- 
ber 10, 1864. Since that time he has been 
engaged in farming, making a specialty of 
dairy products. In the winter he makes sleds 
in his father's old shop. He also has con- 
siderable business as an undertaker. 

Mr. Byam was married in 1874 to Mary P., 
daughter of Andrew Wetherbee, a respected 
citizen of Stow, Mass. Ednah F., the elder 
of his two children, is a stenographer in the 
office of the Boston & Maine Railroad in 
Lowell. The younger, Alta B., is attending 
school. Mr. Byam, who is a Republican, has 
held several town offices, and he was on the 
School Committee for four years. He is a 
member of Pentucket Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of Lowell; of Oberlin Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
of Lowell; a comrade of James A. Garfield 
Post, No. 120, G. A. R. ; and he attends and 
supports the Baptist church. 



ARREN ALVAH SHERBURNE, 
of Tyngsboro, a manufacturer of 
cider, vinegar, and lumber, was 
born in Pelham, N. H., March 4, 1850. He 
is a son of Warren and Mehitable (Ames) 
Sherburne, and is connected with some of the 
oldest families in this vicinity. His grand- 
father, William Sherburne, was probably born 



in the adjoining town of Pelham, where the 
Sherburnes settled in 1751. Soon after mar- 
riage William moved to Tyngsboro, settling 
on the east side of the Merrimac River, about 
a half-mile from where his grandson, Warren 
A., now lives. This farm is a part of the 
original tract claimed by Joseph Perham and 
Joseph Butterfield in 171 1. William Sher- 
burne died November 29, 1876, in his ninety- 
second year. He married Betsey, daughter of 
William Perham. She died December 14, 
1844. Their children were: William, War- 
ren, Betsey, Sarah, William (second), Ruth, 
James, and Harriet. The first William died 
in infancy; Betsey, who died March 28, 1855, 
successively married Stephen Ricker and Sul- 
livan Richardson; Sarah is the widow of Cor- 
nelius W. Blanchard, and resides in Tyngs- 
boro village; Ruth, who died June 19, 1893, 
was the wife of David Ayers, of Methuen, 
Mass.; James resided in Goffstown, N.H., 
and died in 1868; and Harriet, who died in 
the seventies, was the wife of Mial Davis, 
of Burlington, Vt. William (second), with 
whom his parents spent their last days, had a 
fine farm of one hundred acres in Tyngsboro. 
A stanch Republican, he held some office in 
the town most of the time, was Selectman for 
several years, and died in Tyngsboro, October 
14, 1892. He married Rhoda, daughter of 
Josiah and Lydia Barker Griffin and a native 
of Methuen, Mass. She is living on the 
homestead. 

Warren Sherburne, the father of Warren 
A., was born in Pelham, February 6, 18 17. 
He was engaged in farming for a number of 
years in his native town, and spent the last 
three years of his life in Tyngsboro with his 
sons. A member of the Democratic party, he 
was two years in the New Hampshire legis- 
lature at the time of the war, and he served as 
Selectman of Pelham for some time. Hold- 
ing decided opinions, he enjoyed an argu- 
ment. He was a constant attendant at 
church. He was helping in the mill-yard 
rolling logs when stricken with paralysis; and 
he died from the shock, March 29, 1897. 
The event was unexpected, as he was a well- 
preserved, active man, though he was a little 
over eighty years of age. His wife died in 
1875. 



^><3P 



X 




GEORGE Z. BLODGETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Warren A. Sherburne remained on the 
home farm until he attained his majority. 
He then went to work as a carpenter and 
painter, and was so employed for some thir- 
teen years in Pelham and Tyngsboro, making 
his home in Pelham. In 1885 he purchased 
the old Butterfield place, with its mill build- 
ings and dwelling-house. In the mill, which 
was some eighty years old, and which was 
equipped with an upright saw, he fitted up a 
circular saw, and made other improvements. 
There is also on the place a wheelwright and 
blacksmith shop and a cider-mill. In ten 
years Mr. Sherburne has built up a good busi- 
ness. He made about four thousand barrels 
of cider in 1S95, and he turns out from two 
hundred thousand to five hundred thousand 
feet of lumber annually. The old mill was 
built by a Perham, and the stone house was 
erected by Colonel James Butterfield in 1838. 
The Colonel's son James, now of Andover, 
Mass., was the last Butterfield owner of the 
property. 

Mr. Sherburne was married in June, 1874, 
to Miss Francena L. Davis, of Chelmsford, 
daughter of Henry P. and Persis (Grififin) 
Davis. The latter respectively were natives 
of Chelmsford and Lowell. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sherburne have six children — Raymond War- 
ren, Dora Blanche, Norman Russell, Ada 
Louise, Maxwell Gardner, and Ruth Evelyn, 
Mr. Sherburne is independent in politics, yet 
he has attended a number of party conven- 
tions. He was elected to the Board of Select- 
men in his first year here, and he has been re- 
elected annually since, serving as chairman of 
the board seven years. He has also served as 
Assessor, as Overseer of the Poor, and on the 
Board of Health and the School Committee. 
Mrs. Sherburne is a member of the Baptist 
Church of Chelmsford. 



rmo 



EORGE ZEBULON BLODGETT 

\ |ST was for more than seventy years an 
esteemed resident of Dunstable. A 
son of Zebulonand Prudence (Kendall) Blodg- 
ett, he was born July 31, 1826, on the farm 
where his family now reside. The old home- 
stead was one of the first farms settled in 
Dunstable, and the family traditions tell of 



the wolves that were numerous at the time. 
It has descended uninterruptedly from father 
to son since it came into the possession of 
the Blodgett family as virgin land from the 
Indians. The present house comprises the 
part built by one of the early Blodgetts and 
the numerous additions it has since received. 

Mr. Blodgett's great-grandparents were Jo- 
siah and Jemima Blodgett. Their son. Lieu- 
tenant Zebulon Blodgett, born January 29, 
1753, died March 21, 1813. Lieutenant 
Blodgett married Mary Richardson, who, born 
August 14, 1765, died June 27, 1839. They 
had two children' — Zebulon (second) and 
Mary. Mary married Frank Richardson, and 
lived in Chelmsford. Zebulon (second), born 
on the farm, November 2, 1797, died June 5, 
1857. His wife. Prudence Kendall Blodg- 
ett, was born May 26, 1802, and died May 
31, 1882. A singular coincidence was her 
birth and death on the last Wednesday of 
May, the old-time election day. Her chil- 
dren were: Mary Richardson, George Zebulon, 
Prudence Emeline, and Sarah Ann. Mary 
Richardson married Walter Parkhurst, of 
Dunstable, who was killed three years ago by 
being thrown from his team, and now resides 
in Lowell, the only survivor of her family. 
Prudence Emeline married James S. Roby, of 
Nashua, N. H., and died in September, 1859. 
Sarah Ann, who was born in 1834, married 
Alfred Bennet, of Lowell, and died Novem- 
ber 28, 1896. 

George Zebulon Blodgett was married on 
January 29, 1861, to Miss Mary Emeline 
Pierce. She was born September 21, 1838, 
daughter of Thomas Rainsford Pierce, of Gro- 
ton. Her children were: Mary, John Zebu- 
lon, William Fred, and Erwin W. Mary is 
now Mrs. Van B. Staples, of Manchester, 
N.H. Erwin W. Blodgett died March 28, 
189S. The father died February 25, 1897, 
survived by his wife, who for thirty-six years 
was his constant companion and helper. He 
was a charter member of the Universalist 
Parish and a man ever ready to assist and sup- 
port the church in all its religious and benev- 
olent enterprises. Upright, loyal, and true, 
his life was a good exemplification of the Uni- 
versalist principles of charity and good will to 
all men. He was also a member of the Mid- 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dlesex North Agricultural Society and a fre- 
quent exhibitor at its annual fairs. Of a me- 
chanical turn, he was constantly making con- 
trivances for his buildings or implements to 
facilitate his work. In politics he was a Re- 
publican, but never an aspirant to public 
office, although he was sent as delegate to 
various conventions, and always took a deep 
interest in town affairs. There was never any 
doubt as to which side of a question Mr. Blodg- 
ett favored. He was firm in his adherence 
to what he believed to be the right, and was 
willing that his attitude on any subject 
should be known by all men. 



"ClDWARD A. ELLIS, the popular and 
PI efficient Postmaster of Newton Centre, 
'^' ^ - -" was born in Boston on March 21, 
1844, son of Warren and Sarah (Pettee) Ellis. 
His paternal grandfather, Timothy Ellis, a 
farmer by occupation, was a Captain in the 
Revolutionary War, and fought at the battle 
of Bunker Hill. Warren Ellis, a native of 
Reading, Vt., born in 1801, was engaged in 
the pork packing business in Boston, to which 
city he came when a young man, and was for 
many years located at the Quincy Market. 
He died at the age of eighty-five years. His 
wife, Sarah, born at Sharon, Mass., was a 
daughter of Daniel Pettee, of that place. She 
died in 1862, at the age of fifty-four years. 
Of their seven children four are now living, 
namely: Charles W., a business man of New 
York City; George H., who resides in New- 
ton, and is engaged in the ice business; Ed- 
ward A., the subject of this biography; and 
Emma D., who is a teacher of instrumental 
music, residing in Boston. 

Edward A. Ellis, who came to Newton with 
his parents when nine years of age, attended 
the public schools here for a time, and subse- 
quently fitted for college at a private school 
taught by John W. Hunt. Afterward he 
studied for a time at Yale University, but 
owing to poor health was unable to complete 
the course. At the age of eighteen he went 
into his father's store in Boston, and re- 
mained thereuntil 1873. Going West in that 
year, he was there engaged in the pork pack- 
ing business until 1891. For a year he was 



the representative of a New York firm, and he 
spent some time in the railroad business. In 
1 89 1 he received the appointment of Postmas- 
ter of Newton Centre, under President Harri- 
son's administration, and in 1896 he was re- 
appointed by President Cleveland. 

Mr. Ellis was a member of Dalhousie 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of New- 
tonville, and of the Newton Club. In pol- 
itics he is Republican. He is a member of 
the First Congregational Church at Newton 
Centre. In 1867 he was united in marriage 
with Alice, daughter of Josiah H. Coggshall, 
of New Bedford. Mr. Coggshall was of the 
seventh generation descended from Governor 
Coggshall, the founder of the Rhode Island 
Colony, and he was grandson of John Coggs- 
hall, who served in the Revolutionary War. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are: Lill- 
ian E. and Alice E. The former, who was 
born in 1872, is a graduate of the Newton 
High School, and resides at home. Alice, 
who was born in 1875, graduated from the 
high school in 1893. 



KEONARD JARVIS MANSFIELD, a 
popular and highly respected resident 
^ of South Chelmsford, was born near 
his present home, October 29, 18 19. 
His parents were Joel and Rebecca (Cogswell) 
Mansfield. The Mansfield family, which is 
of English origin, first settled in Lynn, Mass. 
John Mansfield was the first to locate in 
Chelmsford; and a part of his farm is still 
owned by his descendants, the land being in 
the family for over one hundred years. He 
also owned land in Westford and Carlisle, 
Mass., and in New Hampshire. He was mar- 
ried twice, and had several children. Two of 
his sons, William and Willard, settled in 
New Hampshire on land purchased by him; 
and another son, Asa, settled on his land in 
Carlisle. His son Asaph died young. His 
son Joel was the father of Leonard J. Two of 
John's sisters were in this locality for some 
time. One married a Snow for her second 
husband, and settled in Westford. The other 
moved away. 

Joel Mansfield, who was the only represent- 
ative of the family left in Chelmsford, culti- 




LEONARD J. MANSFIELD, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



vated the home farm here, an estate of some 
seventy acres, and died at the homestead when 
thirty-seven years old. His widow, who was 
a native of Littleton, N. H., moved to "the 
Centre," where she died at the age of seventy- 
six. They were the parents of the following 
children: George W., who died at the age of 
twenty-one; Jermahia C, who resided near 
the original homestead; Asaph, now residing 
in Winchester, N. H. ; Leonard J., the subject 
of this sketch; Mary, who died at the age of 
twenty; and Joel, who died in Waltham in 
1895. 

Leonard Jarvis Mansfield left home at the 
age of fourteen, and went to Baltimore with 
an uncle. There he was employed in a store 
two years. Returning then to his native town, 
he was engaged in farming, at first for his 
mother, then for himself, until attacked by the 
gold fever, which was then epidemic. In the 
spring of 1850, with his brother Asaph and 
two others, he started for California, embark- 
ing from New York in a steamship. They 
went through the Strait of Magellan and were 
seven and a half months on the way. Mr. 
Mansfield remained twelve years in California, 
working in a number of the old northern mines, 
but did not accumulate a fortune. He returned 
in 1862, crossing the Isthmus when sixty thou- 
sand stand of arms from California were being 
conveyed by the same route. He was two days 
on the Isthmus, and contracted the fever there 
prevalent among all but the natives. On his 
return to Chelmsford he resumed work on the 
farm, where he still follows agriculture. 

Mr. Mansfield was married when he was' 
twenty-two years old to Miss Mary E. Reed, 
of Bedford, Mass., who died in 1894. She 
had four children. Mary B. , the eldest, who 
was the wife of Osgood Robbins, died at the 
age of thirty. Elizabeth, who was unmarried, 
died at the age of forty-three. Leonard, who 
is a farmer and butcher, and lives on the farm 
adjoining his father's, married Miss Edith 
Scoboria. The youngest, Helen Marion, is the 
wife of Orrin Spaulding, of South Chelmsford. 
In 1895 Mr. Mansfield contracted a second 
marriage, uniting him and Mrs. Sarah Eliza- 
beth Dole Martin. Born in Ireland, she came 
to the United States at the age of thir- 
teen. She was the widow of Samuel Martin, 



to whom she was married in Rhode Island, 
and by him had six children. Of these, 
James Andrew, Robert John, and Mary J. 
are living in Rhode Island. Mary J. is the 
wife of Cornelius Frew. Mr. Mansfield cast 
his first vote with the Republicans. In Cali- 
fornia he voted for Fremont, and was hissed 
by his companions; but, when Lincoln was 
nominated, the Republicans carried the pre- 
cinct. He voted for Horace Greeley when, it 
has been affirmed, the famous editor of the 
New York Tribune made the great mistake of 
his life; and he cast his last Presidential vote 
for Major McKinley. He has served accept- 
ably as Selectman and Assessor of South 
Chelmsford. Both he and Mrs. Mansfield are 
members of the South Chelmsford Baptist 
church. They are pleasant, hospitable people, 
and have a great many friends. 



§-OSEPH BRADFORD EMERSON was 
a lifelong and esteemed resident of 
Chelmsford Centre. Born here, March 
15, 1833, he was a son of Bryant and 
Hannah (Bradford) Emerson. The present 
Emerson dwelling, in which his birth occurred, 
is said to be one of the oldest here. As it now 
stands, it is the composite erection of three 
different periods, the last part having been 
built by Bryant Emerson at least seventy-five 
years ago. 

Owen Emerson, the father of Bryant, either 
was born here or came here when quite young. 
A shoemaker by trade, he worked thereat in a 
little shop on the farm when farm duties did 
not require his attention. The maiden name 
of his wife was Mary Spaulding. Their son 
Bryant, who was also born in the house and 
spent his life here, married Miss Hannah 
Bradford, of Salem, N.H. The children of 
Bryant and Hannah Emerson were: John 
Bryant Emerson, who went to California, but 
died of fever just as he reached port, aged 
twenty-one; Joseph B., the subject of this 
biography; Rufus Webster, who lives in Box- 
ford, Mass. ; Hannah Elizabeth, who died in 
childhood; Burt, who lives in Gloucester, 
Mass. ; and Henry Harrison and James Pitts 
Emerson, both residents of Chelmsford. 
The father died here in 1846, aged forty, sur- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



vived by his wife, who died at Gloucester, 
Mass., aged seventy-eight years. 

Joseph Bradford Emerson was thirteen years 
of age when bereft of his father's care. He 
soon toolc charge of the farm, and gave early 
evidence of the marked business ability that 
he afterward developed. At the age of nine- 
teen he left his boyhood home, and went to 
Rock Island, 111., in com.pany with George 
Parkhurst. This proved an unsuccessful vent- 
ure for him, and he suffered much from ma- 
laria. About four years later he returned to 
the homestead, and lived there until his mar- 
riage. He subsequently lived for two years 
in Londonderry, N.H., after which, in 1866, 
he again returned to the homestead, and re- 
sided there for the rest of his life. He did a 
large speculative business in wood, cattle, 
etc., and kept a large dairy. Among the en- 
terprises in which he was interested was the 
Lowell Creamery. His judgment in business 
matters is said to have been very reliable. 
Nor was it exercised wholly for personal ends, 
as persons in need, young men especially, 
often received the benefit of his experience 
and assistance. He was cautious and con- 
servative about entering into new business, 
but whatever he undertook was speedily 
pushed. He was, in fact, too energetic, to 
the neglect of his health. He died February 
I, 1886, in the fifty-third year of his age. 

On September 9, i860, Mr. Emerson mar- 
ried Miss Sarah Parkhurst Byam, daughter of 
Henry and Relief (Spaulding) Byam. She 
was born at the old home, now owned and oc- 
cupied by Charles Wellington Byam. They 
had four children, namely: Fred Lincoln, 
now a milk dealer in Lowell; Walter Bryant, 
who resides here; Agnes Bradford, who died 
when three and one-half years old ; and Edith 
Williams, a teacher in Somerville, Mass. 
Walter Bryant Emerson has been twice mar- 
ried. On the first occasion, December 6, 
1885, he was united to Miss Addie L. Fulton, 
of Maine, who died January 10, 1887, leaving 
one son, Breck. On October 24, 1893, he 
formed a second union with Miss Addie V. de 
Chautal. Her father was in business in Mon- 
treal, Canada. There are no children by this 
union. Mrs. Emerson resides with her son 
on the old homestead, now reduced by sales 



from three hundred acres, its original extent, 
to twelve acres. Mr. Emerson was for nine 
years the chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
and a member of the board for a much longer 
period. While not a politician in the ac- 
cepted sense of the word, he took an interest 
in public affairs. In all his relations he was 
a man of integrity. Inclined to the Unitarian 
belief, he was an attendant of the church of 
that denomination, contributing toward its 
support and exemplifying in his life the prin- 
ciples taught. 



DWARD SIMS LANG SWALLOW, 
prominent resident and native of 
Tyngsboro, was born in the brick 
house nearly opposite his present home, Janu- 
ary 19, 1840. His father, Bera Swallow, was 
born in Dunstable, Mass., April 10, 1806, son 
of Asa and Susannah (Ludlow) Swallow. 
When he was sixteen or seventeen years of 
age Bera was bound out to Jerry Kendall, of 
Tyngsboro, to learn the carpenter's trade. At 
the expiration of his apprenticeship he settled 
here permanently. He followed his trade for 
a number of years, finding lucrative employ- 
ment in Chelmsford when the mills were 
building. At his death on June 5, 1863, he 
was fifty-eight years old. His wife, Cather- 
ine, was a daughter of John and Hannah (Ball) 
Kendall. John Kendall and his brothers, 
Jerry and Moses, built homes and lived near 
each other in Tyngsboro. Miss Martha Ken- 
dall, a daughter of Jerry Kendall, is still liv- 
ing in the house he built. Mrs. Catherine 
Swallow inherited her father's part of the 
property, which became the home of her fam- 
ily. She died August 23, 1868. Her chil- 
dren were: Alvina, Almira M., Edward S. L., 
and Eugene. Almira M. died at the age of 
seventeen. Eugene Swallow, who was a soap, 
manufacturer, died in Montreal at the age of 
thirty-seven. Alvina, who was the wife of 
the Hon. Stillman Davis, of Nashua, died at 
the age of fifty-seven, and her husband 
breathed his last within an hour after that 
event. Mr. Davis was Grand Chancellor of 
the Knights of Pythias. The funeral of Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis, which took place in May, 
1887, starting from the First Baptist Church, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was the largest ever seen in Nashua. They 
left two children: Eugene S., now of Tren- 
ton, N.J. ; and Elmer Frank, of Nashua. 

Having entered the saw-mill of Job Upton 
when he was seventeen years old, Edward 
S. L. Swallow was employed there some thirty 
years, rising to the position of superintend- 
ent. A capable workman, conscientious and 
careful of his employer's interests, he had 
close and friendly relations with Mr. Upton. 
Mr. Swallow is named from an old physician, 
an intimate friend of the family. A treas- 
ured souvenir of his is a silver cup given by 
the Doctor's widow, inscribed: "Edward 
S. L. Swallow. Presented by Mrs. Rebekah 
B. Barnett, June 25, 1840." Accompanying 
the cup was a gift of fifty dollars in cash, 
which, having been deposited in the bank at 
the time, had increased to nearly three hun- 
dred dollars at Mr. Swallow's majority. 

Mr. Swallow was married June 6, 1888, to 
Sarah Rebecca, daughter of Daniel Poor and 
Rebecca (Parham) Coburn. She comes of an 
old family which spelled the name originally 
Colburn. Robert and Edward Col burn sailed 
for this country in the ship "Defence" of 
London on July 17, 1635. They settled first 
in Ipswich, where Edward was living in 1668. 
In 1 70 1 the latter obtained the deed for six- 
teen hundred acres of land in Dracut, a pur- 
chase which cost him two hundred pounds. 
At one time Edward Colburn, his sons, and 
the Varnums owned the greater part of Dra- 
cut. The line of descent beginning with Ed- 
ward includes John,^ Captain Peter Coburn, 
Sr.,-* and Captain Peter Coburn, Jr.' Captain 
Peter Coburn, Sr., the great-grandfather of 
Mrs. Swallow, commanded a company in the 
Revolutionary army. Daniel Poor Coburn, a 
farmer of Tyngsboro, spent his last days on 
the Parham farm, which his wife inherited. 
His other children were: John Parham, born 
March 20, 1833; Lucia, born December 12, 
1835, who died ten days later; Peter, born 
October 10, 1837, who died November 2 of 
the same year; Daniel A., born in 1839, who 
lived but two years and six months ;_ and Eliz- 
abeth, born November 21, 1845, who died No- 
vember 24, 1869. Miss Elizabeth Coburn 
graduated at the age of twenty-two from An- 
dover Academy, Andover, with high rank in 



her class. An earnest and devoted Christian, 
she united with the Congregational church in 
Dracut on May 5, 1867. After graduating 
she and her sister, Mrs. Swallow, secured the 
services of the Rev. Henry F. Durant; and in 
April, 1868, an evangelical church was organ- 
ized, and a church building was dedicated in 
October of the same year. As her health was 
generally good, her death was comparatively 
unexpected. Stricken with typhoid fever, she 
died after an illness of seventeen days. Mrs. 
Swallow is a member of the W. C. T. U., and 
has served as its vice-president. She also be- 
longs to the Ralston Health Club of Washing- 
ton. One of the original members of the 
evangelical church at the village, which she 
joined in 1868, she is still connected with it; 
and she taught one class in the Sunday-school 
for twelve years. 



"ON. DANIEL RUSSELL, of Mel- 
rose, Mass., who has been a resident 
of this town since 1852, was born 
in Providence, R.I. , July 16, 1824. 
A son of Daniel Russell, he comes of patri- 
otic Revolutionary stock. His grandfather, 
Calvin Walker, who was for many years a 
farmer in Seekonk, Mass., served in the Revo- 
lutionary army as a brave and faithful soldier. 
Daniel Russell, a shoemaker by trade, who 
was born in New Hampshire in 1789, died in 
1843. He married Mary W. Walker, who was 
born in Seekonk, Mass., daughter of Calvin 
Walker. Of their ten children who attained 
maturity, Daniel is the only survivor. 

Having acquired his education in the public 
schools of Providence, R.I., Daniel Russell 
worked at shoemaking with his father for two 
years. At the age of seventeen he left home 
to learn carriage painting. To this trade he 
served an apprenticeship of four years, receiv- 
ing, in addition to his board, twenty-five dol- 
lars for the first year, thirty dollars for the 
second, thirty-five dollars for the third, and 
forty dollars for the last year. He subse- 
quently spent four years at journey work in 
Middleboro, Mass., and Providence, R.I. In 
1847 he sold small wares by sample in Boston 
and vicinity, and in 1849 he became an agent 
and book-keeper for the Hon. Nathan Porter, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Providence, R.I. Two years later, continu- 
ing his residence in Providence, he accepted a 
position as book-keeper and salesman with 
Cyrus Handy, clothier, with whom he re- 
mained until 1852. Returning then to Bos- 
ton, Mr. Russell was in the employ of Edward 
Locke & Co., clothing dealers, for three years, 
having his residence in Melrose, where he has 
since made his home. In 1855 he became 
connected with the late Isaac Fenno & Co., 
and in 1861 was made a member of the firm. 
Retiring therefrom in 1869, he has since de- 
voted himself to his public and private inter- 
ests. He is the president of the Melrose 
Savings Bank, a director of the Melrose and 
Maiden Gas Light Company and of the Put- 
nam Woollen Company, of Putnam, Conn. 

Mr. Russell served the town for three years 
as a Selectman, and is now one of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners. In 1878 he was elected 
to the State legislature from the Sixth Middle- 
sex Senatorial District, and he served on the 
Committee on Agriculture and as chairman 
of the Committee on Insurance. Re-elected 
in 1879 to the same body, he served as chair- 
man of the Committee on Insurance and as a 
member of the Committee on Railways and on 
Agriculture. In 18S0 he was a delegate to 
the Republican National Convention at Chi- 
cago. An active member of the Universal ist 
church, he has held many of its offices. He 
was largely instrumental in building the so- 
ciety's present fine place of worship, and on 
its completion he presented the society with 
an organ. He has also given to the town a 
large clock for the Town Hall and substantial 
aid to the fire department, in which he has 
taken a warm interest. Made a Mason at 
Wyoming Lodge on April 24, 1858, he is a 
charter member of Waverley Chapter, R. A. M. ; 
was knighted in the Boston Commandery; and 
became a charter member of the Hugh de 
Payens Commandery in Melrose. In the 
thirty-five or more years that he has labored in 
Masonic circles he has been the organist of 
the different lodges with which he has had 
membership. When the Masonic Hall in 
Melrose was burned, he assisted in building 
the new temple by giving liberally toward its 
construction, and afterward he presented the 
temple with a handsome organ. 



Since his retirement from active pursuits 
Mr. Russell devotes much of his time to 
music. In his home he has a great variety of 
musical instruments, including a piano and an 
organ furnished with electrical attachments. 
On October 21, 1850, he married Mary, 
daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Kimball) 
Lynde. They have two children: William 
Clifton, born May 14, 1858; and Daniel 
Blake, born June ii,- 1862. 



T^OBURN S. SMITH, of North Biller- 
I V]-^ ica, who has an honorable record as a 
^U^^ Grand Army man, and is one of the 
few survivors of the mine explosion 
before Petersburg, was born in Rockland, Me., 
December 20, 1843, son of Elkanah S. and 
Amelia R. (Butler) Smith. Both parents 
were natives of the Pine Tree State. The 
father, who was a mechanic, was Postmaster 
at Rockland for seven years. He served as 
Selectman during the town government and 
as Alderman under the city charter. An in- 
valid when his son Coburn was seventeen years 
old, he purchased a farm in North Billerica in 
the spring of 1861, and there he spent the 
latter part of his life. 

Coburn S. Smith's early days were spent in 
Rockland. At the age of fourteen he went to 
sea, shipping on a coasting schooner; and he 
was employed as a sailor before the mast for 
two seasons and one winter, his wages averag- 
ing seventeen dollars a month. At fifteen he 
was able to do a man's work and received a 
man's pay, and at sixteen he was fully matured 
and had a heavy beard. Though his parents 
did not demand his wages, he divided them 
with the family; and when his father became 
a confirmed invalid he assumed the manage- 
ment of the farm in North Billerica. In the 
fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Forty- 
seventh Massachusetts Regiment, in which 
there were but four Billerica men — Samuel 
Osgood, Leonard Blood, Orlando Manning, 
and Coburn S. Smith. In this regiment he 
was under General Banks's command, and was 
on guard duty in New Orleans, part of the 
time at the Marine Hospital. Discharged 
September i, 1863, he enlisted again January 
I, 1864, a veteran in Company D, Fifty-ninth 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Massachusetts Regiment. He was promoted 
to the rank of Sergeant at Readville, Mass., 
and was made Orderly August i, 1864, in 
front of Petersburg. He served under Major 
Ezra Gould. On May i, 1864, the Fifty- 
ninth reached the front, and on the 5th and 
6th of the same month they participated in 
the terrible battle of the Wilderness. Fol- 
lowing that came Spottsylvania Court House. 
Afterward they were at North Anna, Cold 
Harbor, Petersburg, the Weldon Railroad, 
Poplar Spring Church, Hatch's River, and 
Fort Steadman. In a number of battles Mr. 
Smith had charge of the company in the com- 
manding officer's absence; and on March 25, 
1865, he was commissioned First Lieutenant 
by Governor John A. Andrew, of Massachu- 
setts. Company D was the color company of 
the regiment. At the mine explosion before 
Petersburg twenty-four men of this company 
went into the crater, and seven came out alive 
— two corporals, four privates, and Lieutenant 
Smith. The company was for weeks in the 
trenches before Petersburg, and occupied Fort 
Steadman on March 25. Outflanked there by 
the rebels, they escaped to Fort Haskell, 
whence an almost unceasing fire was poured 
upon the Confederates at Fort Steadman. On 
Monday, April 2, the company marched over 
the rebel works into Petersburg, it being a part 
of the First Regiment and Brigade that did so. 
From that time until Lee's surrender they 
were on guard duty along the railroad lines. 
Of the one hundred and one men forming the 
company on going out, but seven returned. 
On July I, 1865, the Fifty-ninth Regiment 
was consolidated with the Fifty-seventh. 
Lieutenant Smith was discharged July 30, 
1865, at Delancy Court House, D.C. He 
suffered no serious injury, though constantly 
in active service with the company and on one 
occasion in charge of a force building fortifi- 
cations, much of the time under fire. At the 
Grand Army reunion in Boston, March 25, 
1897, he met one of his old comrades, Will- 
iam S. Triol, who was in the same company 
throughout the service and had not seen his 
companions in arms for thirty-two years. 
After receiving his discharge from the army. 
Lieutenant Smith returned to his farm in Bil- 
lerica; and with the exception of four years, 



when he was engaged in carpenter work, the 
time since then has been devoted by him to 
general farming. In 1882 he moved to his 
present home. 

On March 26, 1868, Lieutenant Smith was 
married to Sarah M., daughter of Elijah and 
Melinda (Grant) Corliss. Mr. Corliss was 
from Derry, N.H., and his wife from Arling- 
ton, Mass. They settled in Billerica when 
their daughter was five years old. Mr. Corliss 
died some time since in Lowell. Mrs. Corliss 
lives with her daughter, Mrs. Smith. Mr. 
Smith's children are: Fred C. and Oscar P. 
(twins), and Arthur C. All live at home. 
Fred C. assists about the farm ; Oscar P. is a 
plumber and tinsmith; and Arthur C. is at- 
tending school. Mr. Smith, who is a Repub- 
lican, has served as delegate to several con- 
ventions, and has filled most of the town 
offices. He was Selectman from 1880 to 
1892, chairman of the board for one year, and 
Assessor and Overseer of the Poor for eighteen 
years. He is still Overseer of the Poor and a 
member of the Board of Health. He is an 
esteemed member of Thomas Talbot Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; has passed all the chairs in 
Shawsheen Lodge, No. 64, of Odd Fellows, 
and attended the Grand Lodge; a member of 
Danforth Lodge, K. of P. ; one of the original 
members of J. Gushing Edwards Post, No. 
102, G. A. R., of Billerica, which surren- 
dered its charter; and he now belongs to Ladd 
& Whitney Post, No. 185, of Lowell. Both 
he and Mrs. Smith attend the Unitarian church 
at Billerica Centre. Mr. Smith now owns a 
handsome new house, which has just been 
completed, near the old homestead. 



fESSE BUELL BUTTERFIELD, an 
influential and prominent citizen of 
Tyngsboro, was born February 13, 
1840, on the farm where he now re- 
sides. A son of Cyrus and Clarissa (Dwinell) 
Butterfield, he is descended from Benjamin 
Butterfield, an Englishman who came to 
America between 1630 and 1633, settling first 
in Woburn, Mass, and then moving to Chelms- 
ford. Benjamin's son, Nathaniel, had a son 
Joseph, who was the great-great-grandfather 
of Jesse Buell Butterfield. Joseph was born 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in Chelmsford, June 6, 1680. In 171 1 he and 
Joseph Perham settled where the Butterfield 
and Perham farms now are. He was a Lieu- 
tenant in the Colonial forces; and his com- 
mission and sword are now in the possession 
of his great-great-grandson, Jesse B. His 
son. Captain Reuben, born in 1727, raised 
a company to serve in the Revolutionary War, 
and was in the battle of Trenton. The Cap- 
tain's son Reuben was killed in the service, 
and the Captain died in 18 16. The maiden 
name of Captain Butterfield'.s wife was Mary 
Richardson. Their son James, born in 1762, 
passed his life on the old homestead, and died 
in 1856, aged ninety-four years, si.x months, 
and six days. James married Miss Nabby 
Wilson, who bore him four sons — James, 
Luther, David, and Cyrus. 

Deacon Cyrus Butterfield was born on the 
home farm. May 12, 1804. In early life he 
worked in the quarries in this vicinity. The 
present dwelling-house was built by him in 
1855, of stone furnished by the large bowlders 
on the farm. Successively a Whig and a 
Republican, he served as Selectman, Overseer 
of the Poor, and Assessor; and in i86i he was 
in the legislature. At his death he had been 
Deacon of the Unitarian church of the village 
for many years. Having lived eighty-five 
years and four months, he passed away quietly 
in the night, in his bed. He married Clarissa 
P. Dwinell, of Derry, N.H., who died De- 
cember 24, 1888. Their family consisted of 
Cyrus Franklin, who died in 1848; Alden 
Melbourne, who was a clerk in the House of 
Correction, and died in Cambridge, July 10, 
1881, aged forty-nine; Clarissa Abigail, 
who lives in the village; Araminta, who died 
in infancy; Henry Clinton, also deceased, 
who married Anne Wentworth ; Jesse Buell, 
the subject of this sketch; George Washing- 
ton, born in 1841, who was a soldier in Com- 
pany E, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, and died at Little Washington, N.C., 
in 1862; and Rebecca Russell, unmarried, 
who lives with her sister, Clarissa A. 

Jesse Buell Butterfield passed his boyhood 
on the farm. At the age of twenty-four he 
went to work in a shoe factory in Marlboro. 
He had been employed here two years when 
he returned to the homestead. The original 



estate comprised about si.x hundred acres, and 
was devoted to raising vegetables. It now 
covers about one hundred acres, and is largely 
a dairy farm. In 1887 Mr. Butterfield visited 
Holland, and purchased for his brother-in- 
law, John A. Fry, of Marlboro, Mass., the 
thoroughbred Holsteins forming the famous 
Hillside Herd. Mr. Butterfield bought sixty 
head for the herd, and took some to board 
himself. He now has a herd numbering 
twenty-five, some of which he imported, and 
has found them very satisfactory for dairy 
uses. An active Republican, he served for 
nine years on the Board of Selectmen, eight 
years as chairman. While he was chairman, 
the Lawrence Fund of seven thousand dollars, 
donated to his native town by Daniel Law- 
rence, the famous manufacturer of Medford 
rum, was received by the board, and invested 
in Boston water bonds, assigning the interest 
to the support of the poor of the town. He 
has attended various conventions, keeping in 
active touch with his party, and was in the 
State legislature in 1883. While in the 
House he served on the Committee on Roads 
and Bridges, and secured the passage of the 
law binding the county to maintain the Tyngs- 
boro Bridge. 

Mr. Butterfield was married November i, 

1866, to Harriet Eliza, who was born June 
15, 1844, daughter of Otis and Lovina (Rice) 
Russell, of Marlboro. Mr. and Mrs. Butter- 
field have been blessed with the following 
children: Cyrus Frank, born December 12, 

1867, now a clerk of the Appleton Bank, 
Lowell; Wallace Percy, born November 13, 
1 871, a clerk in the Lowell Institution for 
Savings; Lovina Rice, born November i, 
1878, a student in the Lowell High School. 
These children are the sixth generation of 
Butterfields on the home farm. Wallace 
Percy, who is a graduate of the Lowell High 
School, is chairman of the Tyngsboro Re- 
publican committee, an active Mason, and a 
Knight Templar. 



/^_EORGE F. COLSON, a prosperous 

V f^T and well-known farmer of North 

Billerica, was born September 18, 

1839, ^t his present residence in the village, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



son of Israel A. and Rachel (Farmer) Colson. 
The father, who was born in Uxbridge, Mass., 
came to Billerica when about twenty years 
old, and went to work as an apprentice to 
Daniel Wilson, a carpenter, whose saw-mill 
then occupied the site of the Talbot Mills. 
He subsequently followed the trade for some 
years, building locks on the old Middlesex 
Canal, becoming the superintendent of that 
branch of the work, and remaining with the 
company until about 1852, when the canal was 
abandoned. From that time until his death, 
having purchased the farm that his son now 
owns, he gave his attention to farming. Suc- 
cessful in various undertakings, he acquired a 
fair amount of property. At his death, which 
occurred January 4, 1889, his age was eighty- 
five years and five months. He served his 
town as Selectman for about five years. His 
marriage with Rachel Farmer was performed 
March 28, 1832, when he was about twenty- 
eight years old. She was a daughter of 
Oliver and Hannah (Sprake or Sprague) 
Farmer, and a descendant of Nicholas Sprake, 
as the name was spelled up to 1780. In 1721 
Nicholas Sprake married Elizabeth Birge, of 
Chelmsford, Mass., and settled on the farm 
now known as the Colson place. Their son 
Nicholas and his wife, Hannah, were the par- 
ents of Mrs. Hannah Farmer. Oliver Farmer 
built the present house with brick obtained 
in Boston for wood hauled to that city. Ra- 
chel Farmer Colson, who was a very capable 
and intelligent woman, died October 15, 
1883, aged seventy-nine. She had the fol- 
lowing children: Caroline A., who died in 
1857, aged twenty-five, unmarried; Mary E., 
who was the wife of Julius C. Jockow, of 
I^owell, and died in 1888, leaving one daugh- 
ter; Cairre A., who married Cyrus W. Irish, 
the principal of the Lowell High School, and 
has a daughter named Elizabeth; and George 
F., the subject of this sketch. 

George F. Colson passed his boyhood in 
North Billerica, receiving his education in 
the common school and at Howe High School 
at the Centre. He continued to live with 
his parents until their death. The home- 
stead, which he now owns, is a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, a large part of which, 
from its location in the village, is adapted for 



building lots. It is conducted as a dairy 
farm, and for about fifty years has supplied 
the village people of North Billerica with 
milk. 

On November 22, 1882, Mr. Colson was 
united in marriage with Miss Clara E. Proc- 
tor, of Lowell. She is a daughter of James 
Henry and Eliza (Brown) Proctor, both of 
whom are deceased. Her father was born in 
Unity, Vt., and her mother in Franklin, N.H. 
They came to Lowell thirty years ago, where 
he found employment at his trade of machin- 
ist. Mrs. Colson was born in Lowell, and 
received her education there. Having learned 
telegraphy, she worked in the telegraph office 
of the Boston & Maine Railroad station four 
years. Two children have been born of her 
union with Mr. Colson: George Ralph, now 
aged thirteen ; and James Israel, aged eleven 
years. Mr. Colson has served nine years con- 
tinuously on the Board of Selectmen and 
eight years as Assessor and Overseer of the 
Poor. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Baptist church, he of the church at the 
Centre, and she of a Lowell church, while they 
work with the North Billerica church. 



SOHN HUDSON BACON, a retired 
manufacturer of Winchester, was born 
in Boston in 181 1, son of Robert and 
Mary (Crocker) Bacon. His parents 
were natives of Barnstable, Mass., where his 
father was born in 1778. His paternal grand- 
father, Samuel Bacon, who at the time of the 
Revolution was captain of a sloop engaged in 
the West India trade, died on board of a 
prison ship. A number of the Bacons fought 
in the war for independence. 

Robert Bacon was apprenticed in Boston to 
learn the trade of making felt, and after mas- 
tering it he engaged in business in that part of 
Medford which is now Winchester. He re- 
sided in North Street, Boston, on the site of 
what is now known as Oak Hall, until 1825, 
when he removed with his family to Medford, 
where he erected the homestead dwelling in 
1830. He was prominent in political affairs, 
attending party conventions, and was a leading 
spirit among the citizens of his day. Robert 
Bacon died in 1861, his wife having passed 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



away some years previously, at the age of fifty- 
six. She was the mother of six sons and four 
daughters; namely, Caleb N., Samuel, Robert, 
Thomas C, Henry, John Hudson, Mary, Ann, 
Jane, and Harriet. Of these the present sur- 
vivors are: John H., the subject of this 
sketch ; Ann, now eighty-one years old, who 
lives at the old homestead in Winchester; and 
Harriet, residing in Brooklyn, N.Y., the 
widow of Dr. Thomas L. Smith, late of the 
United States navy. It is a source of touch 
grief to Miss Ann Bacon that the land in front 
of her house has been included within the 
Metropolitan Park System. Robert Bacon, the 
father, was originally a member of the Old 
South Church, Boston, but later became a con- 
vert to Universalism, and joined Father Mur- 
ray's church. His son Henry, father of the 
well-known artist, was one of the leading 
clergymen of the Universalist faith a half- 
century ago. For nineteen years he edited the 
Ladies' Repository, a literary and religious 
monthly published in Boston. His last pas- 
torate was in Philadelphia, where he died in 
1856. 

John Hudson Bacon attended the Hancock 
School, Boston, until he was fourteen years 
old, when he began to learn the felt-maker's 
trade; and at nineteen he was foreman of his 
father's factory. In 1833 he established him- 
self in business, and at the time of his mar- 
riage was realizing four thousand dollars a 
year in profits. During his connection with 
the felt manufacturing industry he invented 
some valuable improvements in the way of 
machinery. He continued in business until 
1882, when he retired. He owned at one 
time one hundred acres of land, extending 
from Church Street to the railroad and to the 
Middlesex Canal ; and he constructed a road 
along its borders from Symmes Corner. He 
sold ten acres to the town of Medford for a 
water-works site, and a large portion has been 
taken by the Park Commissioners. Several of 
the buildings that he erected upon his land 
have been destroyed by fire, and it was at one 
time flooded, the whole causing him a heavy 
loss. Hehas travelled quite extensively, hav- 
ing visited China, Japan, and other foreign 
countries, besides making three trips to the 
Pacific coast. He is known far and near for 



his generous hospitality. To use his own 
words, he has " always kept open house, barn, 
and factory." In religion he is a Univer- 
salist. 

At the age of twenty-two years Mr. Bacon 
was united in marriage with Sarah Ann Tir- 
rell, of Boston, who was then seventeen. Her 
parents were Edward Church Tirrell and his 
wife, Miriam Tirrell. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bacon were born, in the early years of their 
wedded life, five children — John H., Jr., 
Charles N., Edward T. , Alonzo P., and 
Syrena L. John H., Jr., the eldest of the 
four sons, was at one time in the employ of 
the Concord Railroad Company, and was later 
with Fisk & Gould in New York City. He is 
no longer living. Alonzo P., who volunteered 
as a private in the Civil War and returned as 
a Captain, is now engaged in the mining busi- 
ness in California. Charles N. succeeded his 
father in business, and is a manufacturer of 
felting and wool wadding in Boston. Ed- 
ward, who is now residing at the parental 
home, was at one time engaged in the shipping 
business, and visited China, Australia, and 
other remote parts of the world. Mrs. Bacon, 
now an octogenarian, is very bright and active 
for one of her years. 



EONARD THOMPSON, retired mer- 
chant of Woburn, Mass., a man justly 
revered for his personal worth and 
for his generous benefactions to his 
native city, was born on November 21, 1817, 
son of Leonard and Hannah Wright (VVyman) 
Thompson. He is a descendant in the eighth 
generation of James Thompson, one of the 
first settlers of Woburn, who was born in Eng- 
land in 1593. 

James's son Jonathan, who was born in 
England, married on November 28, 1655, 
Susannah Blodgett. Their son Jonathan, Jr., 
who was born September 28, 1663, married 
Frances Whitmore, and became the father of 
Samuel Thompson, who was born September 
8, 1705, and died May 13, 1748. Samuel's 
wife was Ruth Wright. Their eldest son, 
known as Samuel Thompson, Esq., was born 
in Woburn, October 30, 1731, and died Au- 
gust 17, 1820. He served in the French and 




LEONARD THOMPSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Indian War in 1758, and at the age of twenty- 
seven years was commissioned Lieutenant. In 
April, 177s, he took part in the Concord 
fight. Pie had three wives. His first wife, 
Abigail Tidd, to whom he was married on 
May 15, 1753, died in 1768. His second 
wife was Lydia Jones, of Concord. They 
were married February 26, 1770, and she died 
October 19, 1788. For his third wife he 
married October 22, 1789, Esther, widow of 
Jesse Wyman and daughter of Rev. Joseph 
Burbeen, of Woburn. 

Leonard Thompson, first, son of Samuel, 
Esq., and grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Woburn on December i, 
1764, and died September 7, 18 19. His 
wife, Esther Wyman, of Woburn, died on 
October 2, 1846. 

Leonard Thompson, second, was born in 
that part of the old town of Woburn that is 
now Burlington on May 12, 1788, and died 
on December 28, 1880. He was a charter 
member and the oldest member of the New 
England Historical and Genealogical Society. 
His business was shoe manufacturing. He 
was chairman of the Board of Selectmen, As- 
sessors, and Overseers of the Poor of Woburn, 
for several years; and he also served in the 
legislature. He was commissioned by Gov- 
ernors Strong and Brooks as a Captain, Major, 
and Lieutenant Colonel in the Massachusetts 
militia. He was a Justice of the Peace for 
more than thirty years. He settled many 
estates as executor and administrator, and held 
property in trust as guardian. His first wife 
was Hannah, the daughter of Daniel Wyman, 
of Woburn. She died on April 17, 1834, 
leaving two sons: Waldo, born in 181 3; and 
Leonard, third, the special subject of this 
sketch. He afterward married for his second 
wife Anna B. , daughter of the Rev. Samuel 
Mead, formerly pastor of the Congregational 
Church of West Amesbury, now Merrimac. 

Leonard Thompson, third of the name, the 
first mentioned above, completed his educa- 
tion at Warren Academy, which was opened 
in 1829 and offered a thorough course of prac- 
tical studies. After this he learned the shoe- 
making trade of his father. In 1837 he be- 
came clerk in an auction store in Boston; and 
later he was employed in shoe stores in Hal- 



lowell. Me., and in Hartford, Conn. In 1842 
he returned to Woburn, and opened a store for 
the sale of shoemakers' tools, hats, boots and 
shoes. He carried on this business success- 
fully until 1850, when he disposed of his in- 
terest, and, in company with another, started 
a general country store, in which he continued 
for a year. He was then out of business for 
a year, and in 1852 purchased a hardware and 
stove store, and continued in that business 
until 1894, when, upon his retirement, his 
son, L. Waldo Thompson, took charge of it. 

For a long series of years Mr. Thompson 
has filled various offices in town. In April, 
1875, he was elected a member of the School 
Board for two years. In 1877 he was again 
elected for three years, and in 1880 for three 
years more. He is a corporate trustee of the 
Woburn Public Library, in 1865 he was 
chosen a member of the Library Committee, 
and he has been chosen each year until the 
present time, inclusive. In 1880 and 1881 he 
was Town Treasurer; and he was re-elected in 
1882, but did not again serve. In 1876 he 
was appointed Commissioner of the Sinking 
Fund for three years; and in 1877 and 1878 
he served as Representative of the town to the 
General Court, where during the first term 
he was a member of the Committee on Public 
Lands. Plis commission as Justice of the 
Peace has been renewed four times. 

On May 26, 1847, Mr. Thompson was mar- 
ried at Lincoln, Mass., to Maria Laurens, 
daughter of Cyrus and Tryphena (Brooks) 
Smith. Mrs. Thompson was a member of the 
first class to graduate from the first State 
Normal School in Massachusetts, then located 
at Lexington. When she entered the school, 
candidates were examined by the State Board 
of Education, among whose members at that 
time were Horace Mann, Robert Rantoul, and 
Jared Sparks. Previous to her marriage Mrs. 
Thompson taught school six years, and was 
considered one of the first-class teachers of 
the day. 

Of the four children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson, three are living — Louis Waldo, 
Nellie Smith, and Edgar Bradford. The 
eldest, Jennie Lind Thompson, who was mar- 
ried in 1874 to James Burbeck, died in 1884, 
leaving three children. Louis Waldo Thomp- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



son was born in September, 1852, was grad- 
uated at the Woburn High School, and is now 
in the hardware business. He married Helen, 
daughter of Salem T. Brigham. Nellie Smith 
was born in July, 1855. She received her 
education in the public schools of Woburn, 
and married Edward Shaw, since deceased. 
She now resides in Woburn. Edgar Brad- 
ford Thompson was born in March, 1859. He 
pursued advanced courses of study at Warren 
Academy and the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, and is now mechanical engineer 
at St. Paul, Minn., in the employ of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad Company. He was 
formerly for fifteen years with the Chicago & 
North-western Railroad. 

As a member of the New England Histori- 
cal and Genealogical Society, as a founder, 
one of the principal donors, a trustee, and an 
active member of the Rumford Historical As- 
sociation, president of the Thompson Memo- 
rial Association, and a leading promoter of 
the work of preparing the " Memorial " of the 
Thompson family, Mr. Leonard Thompson 
has actively interested himself in preserving 
the memory of former times and past genera- 
tions. He is a member of the Society of 
Colonial Wars and of the American Library 
Association. He has recently published a 
book entitled "Diary of Samuel Thompson," 
which is a valuable and beautifully illustrated 
work, and includes records of his ancestor 
and of the other Woburn men that were 
in the French and Indian War. In 1892, on 
the occasion of the two hundred and fiftieth 
anniversary of the settlement of Woburn, Mr. 
Thompson presented to the city six thousand 
dollars, to be known as the Burbeen Free 
Lecture Fund; and on the evening of the 
fiftieth anniversary of his marriage, May 26, 
1897, he gave an additional five thousand dol- 
lars for the same purpose. He also pre- 
sented to the Public Library the interesting 
historical painting, " The Ordination of the 
Rev. Thomas Carter," Woburn's first minister, 
and the portrait of the Hon. John Cummings, 
both by the well-known artist, Albert Thomp- 
son, of Woburn. 

Mr. Leonard Thompson has travelled exten- 
sively, both in the Old World and in the 
New; and in June, 1897, he went to Europe 



as delegate to the Library Congress. In 1889, 
in company with his son Edgar, he visited the 
Paris Exposition. He also visited Munich, 
where resided in the latter part of last cen- 
tury his distinguished kinsman, Benjamin 
Thompson, better known as Count Rumford, 
who was born in 1753 in the house in North 
Woburn now containing the Rumford Library 
and the relics collected by the Rumford His- 
torical Society. Mr. Thompson is a member 
of the I. O. O. F. He is connected with the 
Orthodox church, and in politics is a lifelong 
Democrat. 



§-OHN PARHAM COBURN, farmer, 
one of the prominent residents of 
Tyngsboro, was born March 20, 1833, 
in his present home. His parents 
were Daniel Poor and Rebecca (Parham) Co- 
burn. His great-grandfather. Captain Peter 
Coburn, who was a resident of Dracut, com- 
manded a company in the Revolutionary army, 
and was engaged at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Captain Peter's son. Captain Peter, Jr., also 
of Dracut, was John P. Coburn 's grandfather. 
Daniel Poor Coburn was born in Dracut. 
In early manhood he was engaged in trade for 
about six years. After his marriage he settled 
on the Parham farm in Tyngsboro, and in 1873 
he built a house for himself near the old one. 
He was a good man, of strong character, and 
possessed the traits characteristic of the Fry 
family, to which his mother belonged. He 
died in October, 1S81, aged eighty-two. His 
wife was a daughter of John and Jemima 
(Blodgett) Parham and a great-grand-daughter 
of Joseph Parham, one of the original settlers 
of Tyngsboro. Joseph Parham, in company 
with Joseph Butterfield, located here in 171 1 ; 
and his son John, the grandfather of Mrs. Re- 
becca Coburn, passed his life here. John 
Parham, Jr., who built the first Coburn house 
in 1803, died in 1837, aged ninety-one. His 
wife, a daughter of Zebulon Blodgett, of Dun- 
stable, Mass., died in 1846, aged eighty-six. 
Besides Rebecca they had two other daugh- 
ters: Sarah, who became Mrs. William 
Parham; and Rachel, the wife of Colonel 
James Butterfield, who built the stone house 
and mill where W. A. Sherburne now lives. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mrs. Rebecca Coburn died in September, 
1882, aged eighty-two years. Her children 
were: John Parham Coburn, the subject of 
this sketch ; Lucia, who was born December 
12, 1835, and lived but ten days; Peter, born 
October 10, 1837, who died November 2 of the 
same year; Daniel A., born March 23, 1839, 
who lived two years and six months; Sarah 
R. , born June 26, 1842, now the wife of Ed- 
ward S. L. Swallow, of Tyngsboro village; 
and Elizabeth, born November 21, 1845, ™ho 
died in November, 1869. Elizabeth Coburn 
graduated from the Female Seminary at An- 
dover in 1867, was fitted for the profession of 
teacher, and was actively interested in church 
work. 

John Parham Coburn grew to manhood on 
the home farm, attending school in Tyngs- 
boro. He has been engaged in general farm- 
ing on the homestead since early manhood, and 
has been very successful. Mr, Coburn, who 
is a Democrat, has decided views on political 
matters, and has the courage of his convic- 
tions. He was a member of the School Com- 
mittee for a number of years, and he served 
efficiently as Superintendent of Schools. 

On March 10, 1S59, he was united in mar- 
riage with Susan Campbell Crowell, who was 
born in Windham, N. H., May 30, 1841. A 
daughter of Jesse and Hannah (Campbell) Cro- 
well, she was a descendant of Lieutenant Sam- 
uel Crowell, who moved from Salem to Haver- 
hill, Mass., in 1730. Samuel had two sons, 
Jonathan and David. David settled in Lon- 
donderry, N.H., and married Elizabeth Emer- 
son, of Windham. Their son, Jesse, Mrs. 
Coburn's father, who located in Windham, 
married Lydia, daughter of Henry Campbell, 
a merchant of Windham, and later her cousin, 
Hannah Campbell. By his first wife there 
were six children, and by his second ten. 
Mrs. Coburn was the youngest of all. She 
died September 23, 18S9, leaving the follow- 
ing children: Daniel Leslie, who studied 
chemistry at the Boston Listitute of Technol- 
ogy, and was for ten years the examiner of 
drugs and chemicals for the port of Boston; 
Alice Catherine, her father's housekeeper; 
Francena Elizabeth, now the wife of Charles 
P. Hartshorn, of Milford, N.H.; and Lillian 
Susan, the wife of George W. Merrill, of 



North Chelmsford. Mr. Coburn subsequently 
married Miss Mary Josephine Wilson. 



W\l Medf 
V» V^ was 



AM CUSHING WAIT, of 
Medford, a Boston lawyer of repute, 
was born in Charlestown, Mass., 
December 18, i860, son of Elijah Smith and 
Eliza Ann (Hadley) Wait. He is a descend- 
ant of Samuel Wayte, of Weathersfield, Eng- 
land, whose son, Captain John Wayte, was the 
family's first American ancestor. Captain 
Wayte, who settled in Maiden, Mass., in 
1638, and was the first Clerk of that town, 
died in 1693. From him the line of descent 
is traced directly to William Gushing Wait, 
the subject of this sketch, who belongs to the 
seventh generation. All the intervening an- 
cestors resided in the vicinity of Boston. 

Elijah Smith Wait, William C. Wait's 
father, was a native of Medford. For many 
years he was employed as book-keeper by the 
well-known Boston firm of Carpenter, Wood- 
ward 81 Morton. In 1876 he moved to Chi- 
cago, where he died in 1895. Eliza Ann 
Hadley Wait, his wife, who is a native of 
Medford and a representative of an old family 
of that locality, is still living in Chicago. 

William Gushing Wait was graduated from 
the Medford High School in 1876 and from 
Harvard University with the class of 1882. 
His legal studies were begun at the Harvard 
Law School, from which he was graduated in 
1885, and the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Laws were conferred upon him by 
Harvard University. He was admitted to the 
Suffolk County bar. May 15, 1S88, and to the 
United States Circuit Court in 1891. He 
gained his first professional experience in the 
office of Nathan Matthews, Jr., who was after- 
ward Mayor of Boston. Later he was asso- 
ciated with Samuel J. Elder, and in 1892 be- 
came a member of the firm of Elder, Wait & 
Whitman. In politics Mr. Wait is a Demo- 
crat, and belongs to the sound-money division 
of that party. He was a member of the 
special committee appointed to draw up the 
charter for the city of Medford in 1892, and 
was a member of Medford's first Board of 
Aldermen. He has served on the town and 
city committees, has been a member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



School Board since 1895, has been a candidate 
for the legislature three times, and has ren- 
dered valuable support to the no-license 
cause in Medford. He has been officially 
connected with the Royal Arcanum, is a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Reform Club, the 
New England Free Trade League, the Appa- 
lachian Mountain Club, the Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts, the Suffolk Bar Association, 
the Twentieth Century Club of Boston, the 
Medford Club, and the Medford Comedy 
Club, the president of the Medford Historical 
Society, a non-resident member of the New 
York Reform Club, and a member of both the 
Harvard Law School Alumni Association and 
the Class of 1S82 Committee. 

On January i, 1889, Mr. Wait married 
Edith F. Wright, daughter of John S. and 
Mary C. (Green) Wright. She is a grand- 
daughter of Elizur Wright and Beriah Green, 
both of whom were famous leaders in the anti- 
slavery cause. Aside from his law practice, 
Mr. Wait has found time to attend to consider- 
able literary work, consisting of some articles 
upon law subjects tor the American and Eng- 
lish Encyclopedia; also some items in regard 
to social subjects for the Tenth Census, and 
much editorial matter contributed to the Med- 
ford Memiry. 



IDWARD AUSTIN MARSH. —In the 
History of Whately, Mass., occurs the 
following: " Marsh, Asa the aged 
and wife, 1 783-1 802, a nail-maker." In 
Sheldon's History of Deerfield is a record of 
" Amos Marsh, from Douglas 1782, of Deer- 
field 1806. He married Elizabeth Jefferson, 
by whom he had thirteen children." 

The following, from a brief outline gene- 
alogy of descendants of John Marsh, of Boston, 
by D. W. Marsh, appears to include the Asa 
and Amos mentioned in above quotations: 
" Asa Marsh,'' born August 31, 1724, at Med- 
field, son of Joseph ^ (probably Joseph- and 
John '), a nail-maker, removed from Douglass 
to Whateley, 1783, married about 1749 
Melissa Wheeler (or Woodstock). Amos, 5 
second son of Asa,'' married about 1777 Eliza- 
beth Jefferson, and had thirteen children." 

The next in line, Amos, son of Amos,' mar- 



ried June 15, 1806, Phila Cooley, of Sunder- 
land, Mass., and lived in that town. One of 
his sons was Austin Lysander, a carpenter, 
who married Maryett Field, daughter of Eras- 
tus Field, of Leverett, Mass., and had three 
children: Helen Laura, who died in i860; 
Edward Austin, born November 11, 1837; 
and Mary Lucy, who married Wesley Morgan, 
of Leverett, where she now lives. The father 
died in early manhood in 1840. The mother 
died in 1842. 

The son continued to live with his grand- 
parents, Amos and Phila Marsh. The grand- 
father was a cripple, having had his back 
broken by being caught by a falling tree; but 
in spite of the fearful injury he lived to the 
age of seventy-eight, dying July 4, 1863. 
Besides the lameness resulting from his injury, 
he had the additional infirmity of severe deaf- 
ness, which in a great measure cut him off 
from communication with his fellow-men. 
Notwithstanding these afflictions, he was uni- 
formly cheerful. At his funeral it was said 
by his pastor, who had seen him daily for 
years, " He was one of the best men I ever 
knew." In his later years he employed him- 
self in his little shop at his trade of cooper, 
and did faithful work. 

The educational privileges early enjoyed by 
the subject of this sketch were those afforded 
in country towns at that time, three months' 
schooling in winter and a similar term in 
summer, till he was about ten years old, when 
he was old enough to earn his board, which he 
did by driving cows to and from pasture and 
doing other light work on a farm. In 1S51 he 
went to live in Springfield, Mass. Here he 
completed his school life when fifteen years 
old, being at that time in the graduating class 
of the grammar school. During the next three 
years he was employed in the agricultural store 
of Allen & Mason in Springfield. In 1856 he 
went into the shops of the Springfield Tool 
Company to learn the machinist's trade. The 
superintendent of the Tool Company was Mr. 
Chester VanHorn, a thorough mechanic and 
something of an inventor also. He interested 
himself in the young apprentice, and put him 
in the way of rapid advancement, also giving 
him an opportunity to do some " piece work," 
which added a little to the regular appren- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tice's pay of fifty cents per clay for the first 
year and seventy-five cents per day during the 
second year. The very first of this special 
money was used for the purchase of a set of 
draughting tools, and Mr. VanHorn in a few 
evening lessons gave him the foundation prin- 
ciples of mechanical drawing. 

When the financial crisis of 1S57 compelled 
the closing of the tool works, young Marsh in 
common with hundreds of others was thereby 
thrown out of work. Mr. VanHorn gave him 
a letter of recommendation as comparing favor- 
ably with journeymen of some years' experi- 
ence, and after a time he found employment 
in a manufactory of steam-pumps, and later 
secured work upon gun-making machines at the 
Ames Manufactory in Chicopee, Mass. On 
the completion of the gun machinery he went 
to work at Colt's Armory in Hartford, Conn., 
but in a few months returned to Chicopee. 
While there he was sent for by his old in- 
structor, Mr. VanHorn, to come to South 
Manchester, Conn., to build some delicate 
machines for the automatic measuring of silk 
for the Cheney Brothers' Silk Works. Here in 
1861 he was transferred to the work of experi- 
menting on magazine rifles under the direction 
of Mr. C. M. Spencer, the inventor. 

On the outbreak of the war of secession he 
heard the call for volunteers for the Union 
army, and in common with thousands of young 
men proposed to enlist, but was advised by 
his friends that he could be more useful to his 
country by making guns than by using them. 
His military ardor, however, found some ex- 
pression in the weekly drill of the Manchester 
Cadets, which was organized as a battalion 
under Major Arthur Cheney. At a later time 
in 1861 he did enlist for thirty days for the 
defence of Washington; but the anticipated 
danger was averted, and the special volunteers 
were not called out. The fact of the existence 
of war did not, however, deter the young man 
from taking a wife, and in June he was mar- 
ried to Olive C. Scamman, daughter of Samuel 
F. and Olive (Moody) Scamman, of Spring- 
field, Mass., both natives of Saco, Me. 

About the close of that year a company was 
formed in Boston for the manufacture of the 
Spencer rifle for government use; and in Jan- 
uary, 1862, Mr. Marsh and his wife took up 



their residence in Boston, where he continued 
his work on guns and tools with Mr. Spencer. 
In the spring of 1863 he was induced to accept 
a similar position in a rifle factory in New 
York City, which was also making guns for 
army use under a contract from the United 
States government. But on the first day of 
the draft riots in New York, July 13, 1863, 
the gun factory was attacked by the rioters, a 
number of whom were shot by the defenders' of 
the factory during the first assault. The 
rioters, being so vigorously repulsed, retired 
for consultation ; and during the cessation of 
hostilities the workmen, who had voluntarily 
remained to defend the factory, were advised 
by those in command to make their escape, in- 
asmuch as it was evident that the force, of per- 
haps fifty, was entirely inadequate to hold the 
position against the thousands of rioters who 
were bent on securing the guns supposed to be 
in the building. Mr. Marsh and the others 
therefore made their escape by climbing 
through the windows of a rear building and 
over the wall of the court into the rear of a 
house on a side street, and so reached a place 
of safety. The mob soon rallied and made a 
second assault, and soon were in possession of 
the building, into which they swarmed; and 
some of them, making their way to the top 
floor, began to throw out the rifles, which were 
in readiness for shipment. While they were 
thus busy, others had applied the torch to the 
lower part of the building, which was soon a 
mass of flame; and many of the mob were 
penned in, and met their death by burning or 
by jumping from the windows. 

Having lost all his tools, and with no prob- 
ability of further employment in the near 
future, Mr. Marsh decided to leave the city at 
the first opportunity. It was impossible to go 
by railroad, as trains did not run. But on the 
next day he was able to find a hackman who 
would undertake to carry him and his wife to 
one of the Sound steamers to leave in the 
evening. It was a peculiar ride from Twenty- 
fourth Street to Peck Slip, in that it was 
through almost deserted streets. Not a store 
or place of business wa.s open. Not an omnibus 
was running on Broadway, which was usually 
thronged and crowded. Very few pedestrians 
even were out. But once in a while might be 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



seen a company of one or two hundred police- 
men marching to the scene of threatened dis- 
turbance; for, unless they appeared in large 
numbers together, they were liable to assault 
by the lawless mob which for some days held 
practical possession of the city. It was, there- 
fore, with no little relief that the outgoing 
steamer was trusted to bear its passengers from 
the threatened city to a place of quiet and 
safety. The riots began on Monday as an op- 
position to the draft, which had been ordered 
by the authorities to secure the quota of sol- 
diers called for by the government ; but after 
the first day's taste of power the mobs aban- 
doned their original scheme, and devoted them- 
selves to plunder, destruction, and pillage. 

Within a few days after leaving New York 
City, Mr. Marsh returned to work for the 
Spencer Rifle Company in Boston, where he 
was put in charge of the machine and tool- 
making department. In the fall of 1864 he 
went to New York City at the urgent desire of 
Mr. John B. Waring (a brother of Colonel 
Waring, the recent Street Commissioner of 
New York), who was just starting a factory for 
making steel pens. In the spring of 1865 he 
went back to Boston, and shortly accepted an 
oft-repeated invitation to enter the employ of 
the American Watch Company at Waltham, 
Mass. He had been in Waltham but a few 
weeks, however, when word came from the 
agent of the Ames Manufacturing Company, of 
Chicopee, Mass., that it was desired to start a 
pen factory in that place. Mr. Marsh was in- 
duced to go to Chicopee and organize and 
equip a complete factory, although it was with 
regret that he severed his connection with the 
watch factory. A year of diligent work in 
Chicopee was sufficient to build a complete set 
of tools and machines and equip a factory for 
pen-making, and quite a stock of pens were 
manufactured. But, when the attempt was 
made to place them on the market, it was 
found that competition was to be very close; 
and it was decided to sell out the entire equip- 
ment if possible. Mr. Marsh therefore with- 
drew, with a gain of experience as a partial 
compensation for loss of time and money. He 
was very shortly recalled to the Waltham 
Watch Factory, where he entered the machine 
department, being first employed in the mak- 



ing and care of the machine-shop tools, and 
subsequently in the draughting-room. 

When returning to Waltham in 1866, it was 
in the hope and purpose of making this town 
his permanent home. He therefore removed 
his membership to the Trinitarian Congrega- 
tional Church, and engaged in church work. 
In a short time he became acquainted with 
Daniel French, Esq., one of the most promi- 
nent and influential members of the church 
and for years active in the public affairs of the 
town. To Mr. French Mr. Marsh feels in- 
debted for encouragement and for inspiration, 
as well as for substantial pecuniary aid, which 
carried him over some very hard places. 

In 1872 the promotion of Mr. Ambrose 
Webster from the position of master mechanic 
to that of assistant superintendent of the watch 
factory, allowed Mr. Marsh to succeed him as 
the head of the machine department of the fac- 
tory, a position which he continued to hold 
under Mr. C. V. Woerd, who, in a reorganiza- 
tion of the factory, was made the mechanical 
superintendent. Mr. Marsh was made master 
mechanic in 1883 (when Mr. Woerd retired 
from the factory), and he held the position 
until 1893. While he was master mechanic, 
Mr. Marsh had a direct personal oversight of 
rebuilding almost the entire factory and 
equipping its power plant. Mr. Woerd was a 
mechanic of much ingenuity, and devised some 
of the first automatic machines used in the 
manufacture of watches; and on his retirement 
Mr. Marsh produced quite a number of ma- 
chines of that character. But the time for the 
extensive use of such machines had not then 
arrived, although enough was accomplished to 
demonstrate their entire practicability. 

The somewhat long term of service with the 
watch company and the opportunity of learn- 
ing much of its growth and progress led to the 
duty of preparing its history being assigned to 
Mr. Marsh. This work appears in the History 
of Middlesex County, together with other 
matter relating to the town and city of 
Waltham, and forms chapter fifty of the third 
volume, Other literary work was undertaken 
as occasion seemed to demand, such as the 
articles on watches for two recently published 
encyclopedias and one dictionary; and Mr. 
Marsh was perhaps the first person to give 




HENRY ROSS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



public lectures on the construction of the 
pocket watch. Several such lectures he gave, 
illustrated by stereopticon views with movable 
mechanical slides. Work of this kind was, 
however, not relished, and was gladly trans- 
ferred to another. In 1893 the assistant 
superintendent of the watch factory retired, 
and Mr. Marsh succeeded to his position, 
which he now occupies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marsh have had three children 
— Clara Edith, Charles French, and Grace 
Ethel. The two daughters are now living; 
but the only son died on December 11, 1876, 
after a brief illness of three days of malignant 
diphtheria. 

Mr. Marsh inherited from his father and 
grandfather a taste for mechanics, and early 
gave evidence of inventive talent. When a 
boy he played in the old cooper shop, and 
learned from his grandfather the use of tools. 
One of his last undertakings before leaving his 
grandfather's home was the building of a 
horseless road carriage, or "hand-car. " This 
vehicle was made entirely of wood, and was 
designed to be operated by two persons, who 
were to propel it by turning a crank. The car 
was completed, and only lacked some leather 
belting to transmit the muscular energy of the 
boys' arms to the pulleys attached to the driv- 
ing-wheels. Poverty prevented the purchase 
of the needful belting, so recourse was had to 
a piece of old rope. But, alas, the art of 
splicing was unknown, and the big knots in 
the rope were an insuperable obstacle to com- 
plete success. Doubtless, the advent of the 
horseless vehicle at that time would have been 
somewhat premature, but the undertaking of 
the boy of forty-five years ago has just been re- 
sumed by the man as an experiment and in the 
hope and expectation of practical use. In 
1884 Mr. Marsh took up his abode in West 
Newton, where he still resides. 



"ENRY ROSS, the superintendent of 
the Newton cemetery and a promi- 
nent resident of Newton, was born 
in Newtonville, April ]8, 1822, 
son of Silas and Nancy (Cook) Ross. Silas 
Ross, a mason by occupation, was born in 
Sterling, Mass., and died at the age of eighty- 



one years. Of his six children, Henry is the 
sole survivor. 

Henry Ross received his early education in 
the public schools of Newton and at Esquire 
Davis's private school in West Newton. At 
the age of fourteen years he began to learn 
the mason's trade with his father. This ac- 
complished, he worked as a journeyman for 
some time. After spending about a year in 
Hopkinton, he returned to bis native town, and 
worked at his trade there until 1842. He was 
then engaged in the florist business with 
Edwin Flukes at Newtonville for four years. 
After this he worked at his trade again until 
1861, when he came to Newtonville. A short 
time later he became superintendent of the 
Newton cemetery, which position he has since 
held. When Mr. Ross received this appoint- 
ment, the cemetery was in a very crude state, 
with only a few of the main avenues laid out, 
and but a small number of lots sold. Under 
his direction and supervision the grounds 
have been systematically laid out, with well- 
drained lawns, fountains, and landscape gar- 
dening, and a chapel and conservatory, the 
gift of Mr. Farlow, added. All the orna- 
mental trees, shrubs, and flowers are raised in 
the cemetery nursery. The burial-ground, 
which contains eighty-six acres, is now one of 
the finest in the State. 

Mr. Ross is an active member of the New- 
ton Horticultural Society, was its president 
for a number of years, and was one of those 
who originally helped to build up the society. 
Formerly a Whig and then a Free Soiler, 
he is now a Republican. He was a strong 
anti-slavery man, and he cast his first vote for 
President in 1844. He was married in Troy, 
N.Y. , to Emily J., daughter of Noah and 
Emily Start, of that city. Of the children 
born to him, Henry Lewis and Lucius Edward 
died in infancy. A daughter, Lucy Ross, 
resides with her parents, and has charge of 
the book-keeping for the cemetery. Another 
daughter, Julia Eliza, also resides at home. 



fHOMAS CHRISTY NEWCOMB, a 
resident of Medford, where he is a 
large real estate owner, and was until 
quite recently proprietor of a retail shoe store, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was born in Boston, November 26, 1823, son 
of Norton Newcomb. He comes of excellent 
English ancestry, being a lineal descendant of 
Francis Newcomb, who came from England to 
Massachusetts in 1635, and settled in what is 
now Ouincy. 

Captain Thomas Newcomb, a descendant of 
Francis in the fifth generation, was born in 
Braintree, Mass., June 15, 1730, and served 
throughout the Revolutionary War, being at 
first a Lieutenant and afterward commander 
of a company. His son Bryant, then a lad of 
fourteen, went with him when he left home on 
hearing of the battle of Lexington. He also 
enlisted and served six years in the war. In 
1785 Captain Newcomb was Justice of the 
Peace in Braintree, where fifteen years later 
his death occurred. 

Remember Newcomb, the grandfather of 
Thomas C, was born December 13, 1767. 
He was an active participant in the second 
war with Great Britain, and died in 18 14 at 
the battle of Plattsburg. His widow, whose 
maiden name was Susannah Brackett, sup- 
ported herself and family afterward by taking 
boarders. She died in 1836. 

Norton Newcomb was born in Braintree, 
Mass., May 13, 1796. For many years of his 
life he was engaged in trade on Hanover 
Street, Boston, being one of the oldest and 
best known boot and shoe dealers of that city. 
He married March 25, 1821, Lydia Christy, 
a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Christy, 
and fifty years later they celebrated their 
golden weclding. . They lived but three years 
after that event, Norton Newcomb passing 
away March 26, 1874, and his wife, June 26 
of the same year. Their children, nine in 
number, were all born and bred in Boston. 

Thomas Christy Newcomb acquired his ed- 
ucation in the Boston schools, and was after- 
ward a clerk in his father's store until he be- 
came of age. At that time he was taken 
into partnership, and the business was con- 
tinued under the firm name of Norton New- 
comb & Son for a dozen years or so. The 
father's interest was then purchased by a 
younger son, and the firm name changed to 
T. C. & C. F. Newcomb, who thenceforward 
carried on a substantial business in one store 
on Hanover Street for forty years. In May, 



1 891, Mr. Newcomb disposed of his interest 
in the business, and, removing to Medford, 
established a shoe store, which he conducted 
until April of the present year, 1898, when he 
retired from active business. He owns much 
realty here, and one of the pleasant thorough- 
fares of the city is named in his honor. 

For three years he served as a member of 
the Primary School Board in Boston, and he 
was elected for a term of five years in Med- 
ford, but on account of his business was 
obliged to resign after serving three years. 
He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, Med- 
ford Council, No. 94; and of the Legion of 
Honor, Governor Brooks Council, No. 824. 
He was also a member of the corporation of 
the Medford Savings Bank. He is a steward 
of the Methodist church, to which he has be- 
longed many years, and for fifteen years was a 
leader in the choir. He was superintendent 
of the Sunday-school connected with it fifteen 
years, and since resigning that position has 
served as a teacher. He has likewise been 
treasurer and trustee of the church, and prom- 
inent in all work of that denomination. 

Mr. Newcomb was married to Phebe Jo- 
sephine, daughter of Colonel Peter Dunbar, 
of Boston, the first Captain of the Boston 
Lancers, on the 9th of April, 1846; and in 
April, 1896, they celebrated their golden 
wedding. Mr. and Mrs. Newcomb have been 
bereft of two daughters, and their only surviv- 
ing child also is a daughter. Miss Newcomb 
resides at home with her parents. 



/[JTeORGE FRANKLIN STONE, who 
Vh'T conducts an extensive greenhouse at 
Newton, was born here, December 
20, 1827, son of Jonathan and Sophia (Mur- 
dock) Stone. The first ancestor of the Stone 
family to come to America was one James 
Stone, an Englishman, who settled in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. His son, Simon, who with his 
wife, Joan, came over in 1634 in the ship 
"Increase," Robert Lee, master, settled in 
Watertown, and bought land in New Cam- 
bridge, now Newton Highlands. Simon's 
son, Simon, Jr., was the father of the Hon. 
Ebenezer Stone, the great-great-grandfather 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of George F. Stone. Ebenezer married Pris- 
cilla Dyke. Their son Silas was the father of 
James Stone, who was grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

James Stone, born in Newton, a cooper by 
trade and a member of the Congregational 
church, served as a teamster during the Revo- 
lutionary War, having charge of the provision 
supplies. He died in 1837, at the advanced 
age of ninety -two years, having been the father 
of twelve children. Jonathan Stone, son of 
James, was born in Newton on the place where 
his son now lives, and for thirty years was a 
leading builder in this section. For several 
years he was Selectman, and he was a promi- 
nent member of the First Congregational 
Church. His wife, Sophia, a daughter of 
Deacon Murdock, of West Newton, was the 
mother of two sons and three daughters, of 
whom two daughters are deceased. The 
others are: Beulah, now Mrs. Horace Cousins, 
of Newton; George F. ; and Daniel. 

George F. Stone lived in West Newton 
until he was six years old. Thefi he came 
with his parents to Newton Centre, where he 
lived for two years. In 1835 he became a 
resident of the farm he now occupies. His 
education was obtained in the Newton public 
schools and in Mr. Rice's private school, 
which stood near the site of the Congrega- 
tional church. Leaving school, he went for a 
time into the market gardening business, and 
from that started a nursery, which he con- 
ducted for ten years. He then engaged in 
the greenhouse business, raising vegetables 
and plants under glass. At the present time 
he makes a specialty of growing carnations, 
violets, and other flowers, and of the culture 
of small fruits. Since he was fifteen years of 
age he has been a member of the First Con- 
gregational Church, and for many years he 
was interested in its Sunday-school. 

Mr. Stone was married on December 13, 
1857, to Roxana, daughter of Deacon Asa 
Cook, of Newton Highlands. The Deacon, 
who was an official member of the First Con- 
gregational Church, was a carriage-maker and 
undertaker. Mr. Stone's children were: 
Hattie R., born October 22, 1862; and 
George R., born February 3, 1869. Hattie, 
who received a thorough education in the 



Newton High School and in private schools, 
died in 1882. George R., who has taken the 
commercial course at Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College in Boston, is now at home 
with his parents. 



ANIEL STONE, son of Jonathan 
and Sophia (Murdock) Stone, was 
born in Newton, December 5, 1814, 
and was educated in public and 
private schools of this town. After learning 
the carpenter's trade, he worked at that for 
twelve years. Then he came back to settle on 
the old farm, and has since been principally 
engaged in market gardening, marketing his 
produce chiefly in Boston. For many years 
he also drove a wagon. 

Mr. Stone signed the total abstinence 
pledge when fourteen years of age, and 
throughout his life since he has been an active 
worker in the temperance cause. In politics 
he is a Republican, having been successively 
a Whig and a Free Soiler. For over sixty 
years he has been a member of the First Con- 
gregational Church, and for four years he was 
Deacon in that body. He has witnessed the 
growth of the church and Sunday-school since 
the time when there were but four churches, a 
few district schools, and a small number of 
private schools in Newton. Now there are 
forty churches and over thirty-five schools. 
He was married in 1843 to Martha A., daugh- 
ter of Thomas Miller. Born in 1818, she 
died in 1892, having been the mother of five 
children. Of these one died in infancy. 
Those living are: James F., George M., Mel- 
zer F. H., and Martha A. James F. , who was 
born in 1849, ^.nd is now at East Lexington, 
with the Goulds Advertiser Company of Bos- 
ton, married Nellie Chase. George M., who 
was born in 1851, is employed in a stationer's 
store on Washington Street, Boston, but lives 
at Newton Highlands. He married Mary E. 
Brickett. Melzer F. H., born in 1853, mar- 
ried Addie Covel, resides at Boston High- 
lands, and is engaged in the Howard Box 
Factory. 

Martha A., born in i860, who married 
Frederick W. Clark, died in 1896, leaving 
one child, William Daniel Clark. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



WINTHROP L. CHENI 
Treasurer of Belmont, 
a leading insurance age 



[ENERY, Town 
Mass. , and 
agent, was born 
in Cambridge, Mass., February 18, 1845, son 
of Winthrop Ward and Louise (Fillebrown) 
Chenery. His paternal grandfather was 
Moses Chenery, whose wife was named Lu- 
cibia. She died at the advanced age of 
ninety-five years, having been the mother of 
five children that lived to reach maturity. 
One of these, Charles H., is now living. He 
married Anna E. Hurd, and they have one 
son, Charles H. Chenery, Jr. 

Winthrop Ward Chenery was born in Water- 
town, Mass. He was for thirty years a suc- 
cessful commission merchant of Boston and a 
very prominent man. He resided in Belmont, 
and was sent to the legislature from the Bel- 
mont, Watertown, and Waltham district. In 
politics he was a Whig and later a Democrat. 
He died in 1876, at 'the age of fifty-seven 
years. His wife, who was the mother of five 
children, died the same year, in her fifty-sec- 
ond year. She was a member of the Unita- 
rian church. 

Winthrop L. Chenery attended the pub- 
lic schools in Watertown and subsequently 
Chauncy Hall School in Boston, preparing for 
college at the last-named institution. He 
then entered Harvard University, at which he 
was graduated in 1867. Subsequent to this 
he followed farming in Belmont for several 
years. Later he engaged in the fire insurance 
business, with which he is at present con- 
nected, conducting a very successful agency. 
In politics an Independent, Mr. Chenery has 
been actively interested in town affairs for 
many years. He has served on the School 
Committee for four years, one of which he 
was chairman. In 1876 he was chosen Town 
Treasurer and Collector, which ofifice he has 
continued to hold up to the present time, and 
he is also Town Clerk. He has been treas- 
urer of the Belmont Savings Bank since its 
organization in 1883, and is a leader in all 
important movements looking to the welfare 
of the town. 

On April 4, 1S71, Mr. Chenery was united 
in marriage with Ruth B. Holt, daughter of 
Benjamin S. Holt, of Belmont. He has two 
children: Winthrop H., born March 8, 1872, 



and now a Senior at Harvard University; and 
Alice T., born on November 25, 1882. 



ILL! AM PRIOR CHUTE, one of 
Woburn's enterprising business 
men, born in 1856, is a native of 
Bridgetown, N.S. His grandfather, Hanley 
Chute, who went to Nova Scotia from the 
State of Maine, became a large land-owner. 
His parents were Seth and Lavinia (Cogswell) 
Chute, natives of Nova Scotia. The father, 
who was born in Hampton, grew to manhood 
as a farmer. He tilled the soil with energy 
during his active years, and became prosper- 
ous through his ability and industry. He 
married Lavinia, daughter of Oliver H. and 
Rebecca Cogswell, and reared four children. 
The latter were: Minard E., now a florist in 
New York; Oliver H., who is no longer liv- 
ing; William P., the subject of this sketch; 
and Brainard A., a milk dealer in Charles- 
town, Mass. 

William Prior Chute attended the schools 
of his native town, and remained upon the 
homestead farm until 1869. Coming to the 
United States in that year, he resided in 
Haverhill, Mass., for a short time. Then, 
locating in Woburn, he was engaged in sell- 
ing garden produce in the Boston market until 
1877. He was next associated with Alex- 
ander Ellis in the grain business in Woburn 
for about six months, after which he bought a 
farm located on Lexington Street. Selling 
that property in the same year, he purchased 
a piece of land, upon which he erected the 
building he now occupies as a place of busi- 
ness, and entered into partnership with Sam- 
uel Curamings, under the firm name of Cum- 
mings. Chute & Co. This concern deals 
extensively in grain, feed, hay, straw, coal, 
wood, and fertilizers, and the proprietors are 
the leading merchants here in their line. 

On December 3, 1883, Mr. Chute was 
joined in marriage with Susan Cummings, 
daughter of Ebenezer and Sarah (Haven) 
Cummings, of Burlington, Mass. Mrs. Chute 
is the mother of two children: Lewis A., born 
in December, 1885; and William Prior Chute, 
Jr., born May 11, 1887. Mr. Chute is a 




P U B I I C 



WILLIAM P. CHUTE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



163 



member of Mount Horeb Lodge, F. & A. M. 
of Crystal Font Lodge, No. 9, L O. O. F. 
and of Hope Lodge, Daughters of Rebecca. 



iRS. NELLIE M. FARMER, 
ifidow of the late Elbridge 
Farmer, of Arlington, is a native 
of Windham, N.H., and the 
youngest child of Artemus and Betsey (Travis) 
Baldwin. Her paternal great-grandfather was 
Captain Joshua Baldwin, of Tewksbury, 
Mass., who commanded a company at the 
battle of Lexington. Her grandfather, Davis 
Baldwin, was a native of Tewksbury, and was 
reared to agricultural pursuits, which he fol- 
lowed through life. He was known as an 
honorable, upright man. The maiden name 
of his wife was Susannah Stickney, and of his 
five children Artemus was the youngest son. 

Artemus Baldwin was born in Tewksbury, 
Mass., but spent the greater part of his life 
upon a farm in Windham, N. H. His last 
days weje passed with his daughter in Arling- 
ton, and he died at the age of seventy-one 
years. His wife, Betsey, who was a native of 
Hillsboro, N. H., became the mother of six 
children, four of whom are living; namely, 
A. Harvey, Annah, William A., and Nellie 
M. A. Harvey married Elizabeth Emerson, 
and has two children — Carrie and Artemus. 
Annah is the wife of A. Frank Esty, and has 
one daughter, Alice May, who married Alex- 
ander Marsh, an Englishman, and has one 
daughter, Hilda E. William A. Baldwin 
married Julia A. Wilson. Mrs. Artemus 
Baldwin died at the age of forty-three years. 
She and her husband were both members-of 
the Congregational church. 

Nellie M. Baldwin was carefully reared and 
educated. On February 22, 1S69, she was 
united in marriage with Elbridge Farmer, of 
Arlingtoq^ Mr. Farmer died February 4, 
1S94, leaving one son, Walter B. , born April 
5, 1876. Since the death of her husband Mrs. 
Farmer has continued to reside in Arlington, 
and occupies a pleasantly located residence on 
Appleton Street. By a previous marriage the 
late Mr. Elbridge Farmer had one son, E. S. 
Farmer, an account of whom will be found 
upon another page of the Review. Walter 



B. Farmer is one of the most prominent and 
popular young men in Arlington, being a 
member of the Arlington Boat Club and of 
the Boston Athletic Association. On June 9, 
1S96, he married Gertrude S. Jones, daughter 
of George S. Jones, of Leominster, Mass. 



HUBBARD COPELAND, of Woburn, 
of the firm of Copeland & Bowser, 
merchants conducting business in 
— ' this town and also in Reading and 
Stoneham, was born in Reading, Mass., on 
December 18, 1845, son of Elbridge and Ruth 
(Mead) Copeland. His first ancestor in this 
country, Lawrence Copeland by name, came 
from England prior to 165 1, when he married 
Lydia Townsend. The date of his death was 
December 30, 1699. The best authorities say 
that he was one hundred years old, but Chief 
Justice Sewall in his diary gives the age as 
one hundred and ten. 

John Copeland, son of Lawrence, was born 
in Braintree, Mass., on December 12, 1658; 
and John's son Samuel was born on Septem- 
ber 20, 1686. The next in line, Samuel, sec- 
ond, was born on October 28, 171 1; and his 
son Jacob, who was a large real estate dealer 
and a man of great public spirit, was born in 
July, 1746. Jacob married a Mrs. White, of 
Braintree. Their son Samuel, grandfather of 
Hubbard Copeland, was born on April 17, 
1791, and spent his life in Stoddard, N.H., 
engaged in farming. His wife was Susan 
Richardson, daughter of Ziba Richardson, of 
Stoddard, N.H. 

Elbridge Copeland, son of Samuel and 
Susan, and father of Mr. Copeland of Woburn, 
was born in Stoddard, N.H., in 181 5, and 
died in 1852. He was by occupation a cabi- 
net manufacturer. He ,was twice married. 
By his first wife, Lucy Mead, daughter of 
Stephen and Sarah (Stephens) Mead, of 
Washington, N.H., he had one son, Sydney 
by name; and by his second wife, whom he 
married in 1644, Ruth Mead, sister of his 
first wife, he had five children, four of whom 
are now living; namely, Hubbard, Ellis, 
Arthur Clarence, and H. Ober. Sydney 
Copeland enlisted in 1861, in the Twenty- 
second Regiment of Massachusetts Infantry, 



.64 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which was commanded by Colonel Henry 
Wilson, and was assigned to Company D, of 
which Captain Dunning was the commanding 
officer. After a long encampment at Wash- 
ington the regiment was ordered into active 
service; and at the battle of Gaines's Mills, 
Va., on June 27, 1862, Sydney Copeland was 
killed. Ellis Copeland, who now resides at 
Washington, N.H., also enlisted in the war 
of the Rebellion, and while in the service of 
his country received a wound which crippled 
him for life. Arthur Clarence Copeland, who 
resides in Somerville, is in the express busi- 
ness. H. Ober Copeland manages the store 
of Copeland & Bowser, that is situated in 
Reading. 

When only six years of age Hubbard Cope- 
land, after his father's death, went to live 
with a kinsman on a farm in Washington, 
N.H. His education was obtained in the 
public schools of Washington and at Marlow 
Academy, Marlow, N.H.; and after leaving 
school he worked on the farm until he reached 
his majority. He then returned to Reading, 
and, entering the employ of Franklin Fletcher 
as clerk in his dry-goods store, remained in 
that position until 1871. In that year he 
formed a partnership with Robert Bowser, 
and the two opened a dry-goods store in 
Reading. Three years later Richard L. 
Bowser, a brother of Robert, was admitted to 
the firm, which then became Copeland, Bowser 
& Co. At this time a second store was 
opened at Stoneham. On January 17, 1876, 
Mr. Copeland removed to Stoneham, and sub- 
sequently resided there until May i, 1879, 
when the firm opened the store in Woburn, of 
which Mr. Copeland has since had charge. 
In 1886 Mr. Robert Bowser died, and the firm 
has since conducted business under the name 
of Copeland & Bowser. They carry an ex- 
tensive stock of high-grade goods, and have 
gained a reputation for being honorable and 
prompt in all their business transactions. 

Mr. Copeland is an earnest worker and a 
devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He united with a church of that de- 
nomination before leaving his New Hampshire 
home, and on his return to Massachusetts 
transferred his membership to the Methodist 
Episcopal church in Reading. Subsequently, 



upon his removal to Stoneham, he was again 
transferred, and at the present time he holds 
his membership in Woburn. While in Read- 
ing he was steward and treasurer of the 
church, and while at Stoneham was steward. 
For thirteen years he was superintendent of 
the Sunday-school in the Woburn Methodist 
Church, in the senior department; and he is at 
the present time superintendent of the primary 
department. He is also a steward and trus- 
tee. Mr. Copeland was married on Septem- 
ber 17, 1889, to Wilhelmina F., daughter of 
Gilbert W. and Elizabeth (Copp) Smith. 



■rj^EWELL E. PARKER, the senior Se- 
\f=J lectman of Chelmsford was born in 

lis i his present home, December 11, 

1 84 1. He is a son of Eli P. and 
Nancy B. (Pierce) Parker, both natives of 
Chelmsford, and a grandson of Eli Parker. 
The father, who worked at the carpenter's 
trade for a number of years, died January 29, 
1898. The mother died some twenty years 
ago. Of their four children who attained ma- 
turity, Newell E. and Charles W. are living. 
Charles is one of the proprietors of the New 
England House in Boston. 

Newell E. Parker's boyhood was passed in 
Chelmsford. In 1868-69 he was employed as 
clerk in an uncle's store in Boston. For 
about twenty-five years thereafter he worked at 
the carpenter's trade, which he learned from 
his father. A successful business man, he 
completed some important contracts. He is 
an independent voter, favoring the Democratic 
side, and is popular with both parties. He 
has served on the School Committee for a 
number of years, and was elected to the Board 
of Selectmen in 1891. This board, compris- 
ing five members, attends to all the duties 
usually divided between the Board of Health, 
the Selectmen, the Assessors, and the Over- 
seers of the Poor, so that the office of Select- 
man in South Chelmsford is no sinecure. 
That Mr. Parker has proved an efficient officer 
is shown by the length of his term of service. 

Mr. Parker was married February 22, 1870, 
to Miss Maria S. Spaulding, of Chelmsford, 
who died of pneumonia, February 12, 1883. 
She left two children: Edgar R., in this 




PUBLIC 



ONSLOW STEARNS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



town ; and Emma, the wife of David B. 
George, of Clielmsford. A man of active 
habits, Mr. Parker is fond of fishing and hunt- 
ing, and a popular member of the Gun Club. 



fOHN BILLINGS STEARNS, a pros- 
perous dairy farmer of South Billerica, 
was born in his present home, February 
13, 1845. He is a son of Franklin and 
Sally (Lane) Stearns, and springs from some 
of the old and well-known families of Eastern 
Massachusetts. Tbe first of the family here, 
Isaac Stearns, or Sterne, came to America in 
1630, and settled in Watertown. His son 
John, whose birth occurred in 1631, was the 
third male child born in Watertown. John 
purchased the present homestead, which is 
a part of the old Governor Dudley farm on the 
Concord River, and where seven generations 
of the family have lived. John was succeeded 
by his son John, and he by another John, who 
married Elizabeth Bigelow, of Watertown. 
Their son John, born in 1722, married Esther 
Johnson, of Woburn, whose son Isaac married 
Sarah Abbott, of Bedford. 

John, son of Isaac and Sarah (Abbott) 
Stearns, born in 1765, was the paternal grand- 
father of John Billings Stearns. In 1801 he 
was married to Mary, daughter of Samuel 
Lane, of Bedford. Of their children John 
Owen was a railroad contractor, and the su- 
perintendent and a director of the Central 
Railroad of New Jersey; and he resided at 
Elizabeth, N.J. Onslow was president of the 
Old Colony Northern Railroad Company, Sul- 
livan Railroad, Contoocook Valley Railroad, 
and Concord & Clearmont Railroad, and was 
interested in the building of several roads. 
He was president of the New Hampshire 
Senate in 1863, and was Governor of New 
Hampshire in 1869 and 1870. His home was 
in Concord. Mary married William Whitford. 
Eliza Ann married John Dennis Billings. 
Lorenzo died at the age of twenty-three. 
Barnard was for a number of years a resident 
of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Franklin Stearns, the 
father of John Billings, was born January 25, 
1802. He devoted his life to the pursuit of 
agriculture, spending the last sixty years on 
this farm. This is a handsome estate of 



ninety acres, lying for eighty rods along the 
Concord River. Franklin Stearns died May 
29, 1886. His wife, born in Ashby, Mass., 
was a daughter of Benjamin Lane, who lived 
for some years in Bedford, Mass. She died 
November 27, 1894, aged ninety-three. At 
the time of her death there were but two per- 
sons in town older than she. Her children 
were: Susan Isabel, who died unmarried in 
1882; Mary Jane, who died in Elizabeth, 
N.J., on November 10, 1893; Sarah Olive, 
who lived but four years; Sarah Maria, now 
the wife of Asa Duren, and residing in Car- 
lisle; Lucretia Ann, the wife of John P. 
Davis, also of Carlisle; and John Billings, the 
subject of this sketch. 

John Billings Stearns has spent his life upon 
the farm, and was his mother's support up to 
the time of her death. Among the many im- 
provements made by him on the place is a 
barn forty by seventy-five feet, with twenty 
stalls. Lie keeps, on an average, twenty 
cows. His dwelling is over one hundred 
years old. The original residence was on the 
adjoining estate, now the Greenwood farm, 
which was a part of the first homestead. Mr. 
Stearns is a member of Shawsheen Lodge, 
No. 64, 'I. O. O. F., has passed all the 
chairs, and attended the Grand Lodge. He 
is a member of the Bedford Congregational 
Church. 

/^pTEQRGE HENRY MORGAN, Post- 
y|ST master at Newton, Middlesex 
County, Mass., was born May 14, 
1850, in Dedham, Norfolk County, a son of 
John Morgan. He comes of patriotic stock, 
several of his ancestors having assisted in the 
struggle of the colonies for independence. 
His great-grandfather, Henry Morgan, who 
was born in Massachusetts in 1741, and died 
in 1808, served in both the French and Indian 
War and the Revolution. 

Solomon Morgan, son of Henry, was born 
in Concord, Mass., in 1775, and died in 1828 
in Plymouth, Vt., where he had been engaged 
for many years as a lime burner. His wife, 
Betsey Sawyer, was a daughter of Lemuel 
Sawyer, who was born in Lancaster, Mass., in 
1749, and died in 1830. Lemuel Sawyer was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a Corporal in the Revolutionary army, and 
participated in the Concord fight and the siege 
at Boston, went on the Bennington alarm, and 
later was in the Continental service in New 
York. He was a lineal descendant of Thomas 
Sawyer, who emigrated from Lancashire, 
England, locating first in Rowley, Mass., but 
afterward being one of the very earliest set- 
tlers of Lancaster. 

John Morgan, the father above named, son 
of Solomon, was born in 1806 in Plymouth, 
Vt., and died in i8gi at Dedham, Mass., 
where he owned land and carried on farming 
and dairying for many years. He assisted in 
building the first railway, the Granite Branch, 
which ran from the Ouincy quarries to Dor- 
chester Bay, and was put in operation in 1825. 
He married in 1832 Caroline A. Dean, daugh- 
ter of Richard Dean, of Dedham. Her mater- 
nal grandfather, Benjamin Herring, son of 
Samuel Herring, was born in Dedham in 
1738, and died in that town in 1795. He 
also was a hero of the Revolutionary War, 
taking part in the battle of Lexington and in 
the siege of Boston. The parents reared five 
children, as follows: Charles Dean, who died 
in 1870; Caroline E., now residing in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., the widow of the late John M. 
Fisk, formerly keeper of the House of Correc- 
tion at East Cambridge; John D., station 
agent on the Boston & Albany Railway at 
Newton, who married Miss Lizzie Wise; 
Lucy A., wife of John C. Hastings, of Fra- 
mingham; and George Henry, whose personal 
history is outlined below. 

George Henry Morgan was educated in the 
common schools and at Locke's Academy in 
Dedham, being graduated from the latter in 
1867. The following three years he remained 
beneath the parental roof. Coming to New- 
ton in 1870, during the succeeding six years 
he was in the employ of the Boston & Albany 
Railway Company as freight agent and assist- 
ant ticket agent. He was subsequently on 
the staff of the Boston Herald as reporter on 
the line of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
from Boston to Worcester for ten years. In 
the spring of 1887 Mr. Morgan was appointed 
by President Cleveland I^stmaster at Newton. 
He was reappointed by President Harrison, 
and again by President Cleveland during his 



second administration, so that he has served 
in this office eleven consecutive years. 

He is a Democrat in politics, and has been 
a member of both the City and County Com- 
mittee. He is prominent in various paternal 
organizations, being a member of Newton 
Lodge, No. 92, I. O. O. F. ; of Norumbega 
Tribe, No. y6, I. O. R. M., of Newtonville; 
of the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution; of the United 
Order of Pilgrim Fathers; and of the New 
England Association of Postmasters. He 
also belongs to the Unitarian church and to 
the Unitarian Club of Newton. 

Mr. Morgan and Miss Sarah A. Cartwright, 
daughter of James Cartwright, of Wellesley, 
were married on February 15, 1879. They 
have three children, namely: May Frances, 
born in 1881, now a student in the Newton 
High School; Elizabeth Calla, born in 1889, 
now in the primary department of the Newton 
schools; and Miriam, born in 1894. 



\rA)/TLLIAM R. CUT! 
^y the Woburn Pub 
•^ '^ born in this city. 



. CUTTER, librarian of 
Public Library, was 
ity, August 17, 1847. 
Son of Dr. Benjamin and Mary (Whittemore) 
Cutter, he is descended from Richard Cutter, 
who, with his mother, Elizabeth Cutter, a 
widow, came to this country in 1640, and was 
enrolled as a member of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company in 1643. The 
stone that marks the grave of Richard Cutter 
in the old burial-ground in Cambridge bears 
the date, "ye 16 June, 1693." 

His son William, born in Cambridge, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1649-50, married Rebecca, daughter 
of John Rolfe; and their son, Deacon John 
Cutter, born October 15, 1690, married 
Lydia, daughter of John and Hannah (Win- 
ter) Harrington, of Waltham. Ammi Cutter, 
son of the last-named couple, and the next in 
this line, was born October 27, 1733. An ac- 
tive patriot, he participated in the capture of 
a convoy of provisions for Lord Percy's re-en- 
forcements on April 19, 1775, the day of the 
battle of Lexington. He was three times 
married. In 175 1 he was united to Esther, 
daughter of James and Phebe (Reed) Pierce, 
of Woburn. She died January 8, 1772. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



second wife, Abigail, daughter of Simon and 
Abigail Holden, of Charlestown, died June 
29> 1773- His third wife was her sister, 
Hannah Holden. Mr. Ammi Cutter was the 
father of twenty-one children. His son 
Ephraim, grandfather of the Woburn libra- 
rian, was born October 31, 1767. He was 
married March 13, 1791, to Deborah, daugh- 
ter of Captain Samuel and Margaret (Adams) 
Locke, of Menotomy, now Arlington. She 
was born March 10, 1772. Her father, who 
was an officer in the Revolutionary War, was 
an extensive farmer. 

Benjamin Cutter, for a long period the well- 
known and much respected Dr. Cutter of Wo- 
burn, where he practised medicine for forty 
years, was born in what is now Arlington, 
Mass., June 4, 1803. He was fitted for col- 
lege in the academies at Westford and An- 
dover, Mass., and Pelham and New Market, 
N. H., and was graduated at Harvard in the 
class of 1824. In the meantime he taught 
school in winter in different places, and in 
1823-24 was teaching in Medford and Well- 
fleet, Mass. He took his degree from the 
Harvard Medical School in 1827, and in 1857 
he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the Philadelphia Medical College. He 
studied also with Dr. Francis Kittridge, of 
Woburn, and on the death of that^ celebrated 
physician succeeded to his practice. 

Dr. Cutter was the founder and first presi- 
dent of the Middlesex East District Medical 
Society, which was organized at his residence 
in Woburn, October 22, 1850. In 1826 he 
was commissioned surgeon's mate, and in 
1829 was appointed surgeon of a regiment of 
militia. He resigned this position in 1834. 
Dr. Cutter was a leading spirit in the Woburn 
Young Men's Society and the organizer of 
the Woburn Young Men's Library, which 
contained nearly seven hundred volumes, 
mainly of his selection, comprising history, 
biography, books of travel and of science, but 
no novels or religious works. Dr. Cutter 
was a member of the School Committee in 
Woburn from 1845 to 1849, and he was secre- 
tary of the Board of Trustees of Warren Acad- 
emy for thirty successive years. Possessed of 
antiquarian taste and skill, and enjoying an 
extensive acquaintance in this part of the 



county, he succeeded in collecting a rich fund 
of historical, genealogical, and topographical 
lore. About sixty years ago he commenced 
researches which culminated in the History of 
the Cutter Family of New England, published 
by his son, William R. Dr. Cutter worked 
earnestly in the temperance cause, side by side 
with Jewett, Edwards, and Lyman Beecher. 
He died in Woburn, March 9, 1864. 

On September 26, 1824, he was united in 
marriage with Mary, daughter of Amos and 
Rebecca (Russell) Whittemore, of West Cam- 
bridge, Mass. She died June 6, 1871. Dr. 
and Mrs. Cutter had six children: Benjamin 
Austin, born February 15, 1825, who died in 
West Cambridge, August 25, 1825; Benjamin 
Lincoln, born in Woburn, September 26, 
1828; Mary Ann Eliza, born September 16, 
1830, who died April 4, 1832; Ephraim, born 
September i, 1832; Mary W., born Novem- 
ber 18, 1834; and William R., the librarian. 
Benjamin L. Cutter, a graduate of Amherst in 
the class of 1844, made a number of voyages 
to the Pacific, to Calcutta, and to California. 
He died in Mauch Chunk, Pa., March 23, 
1852. Mary W., who married Samuel A. 
Fowle, died on July 21, 1865. Ephraim 
Cutter graduated at Yale in 1852. He re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
Harvard in 1856 and from the Philadelphia 
Medical College in 1857. In 1861 he gained 
the Boylston Medical Prize, and in 1862 he 
made a tour of hospitals and medical schools 
in Europe. He was the first physician in this 
country to construct the laryngoscope, and he 
has published a work on the principles and 
practice of laryngoscopy and rhinoscopy. He 
married Rebecca, daughter of Captain Thomas 
V. and Elizabeth (Dunning) Sullivan. 

William R. Cutter was educated in the 
Woburn public schools, Warren Academy, the 
Norwich Military University (Vt.), by private 
teachers at his home, and in the Scientific 
School of Yale University, where he was a 
special student, taking a two years' course. 
At the age of twenty-one he published the 
History of the Cutter Family, which is now 
out of print. For a number of years he was 
engaged in literary composition and compila- 
tion, and for ten years of this time he lived 
in Lexinston. His works consisted of a His- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tory of the Town of Arlington, Mass., and arti- 
cles on various subjects, mostly local histori- 
cal. He was engaged also in tracing titles 
and managing similar business for others. In 
1882 he was appointed librarian of the Wo- 
burn Public Library. 

Mr. Cutter was married in 1871 to Mary 
E., daughter of Daniel and Mary Ann (Ames) 
Kimball, of Woburn, and grand-daughter of 
the Rev. David Tenney Kimball, who was for 
fifty years pastor of the First Congregational 
Church of Ipswich, Mass. One daughter, 
Sarah Hamlen, who was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Cutter in 1873, died in 1890. While living 
in Lexington, Mr. Cutter was secretary of the 
School Committee for seven years; and he was 
clerk of the committee, and had charge of the 
funds of the Cary Library. He is a member 
of the Society of Colonial Wars, of the New 
England Historical and Genealogical Society, 
and of the American Library Association, and 
ex-vice-president of the Massachusetts Library 
Club. He is a member of Norwich Univer- 
sity Alumni. During the war Mr. Cutter was 
Captain and Major of a juvenile military com- 
pany connected with Warren Academy, the 
first organization of a military character under 
the auspices of a school outside of Boston and 
Worcester. 



ILLIAM A. THOMPSON, the 
well-known designer, manufacturer, 
and retailer of artistic jewelry, 
Boston, and a resident of Medford, Mass., 
was born in Nova Scotia in 1847. He is a 
son of the late John and Margaret M. Thomp- 
son, and is a lineal descendant of John 
Thomson of the Plymouth Colony, some of 
whose posterity removed to Nova Scotia. 

Authorities differ as to the date of arrival 
of the immigrant John, some saying that he 
came in the second or third ship after the Pil- 
grims, others that he came a few years later, 
all agreeing, so far as we know, that he mar- 
ried, in 1645, Mary Cooke, daughter of Francis 
Cooke of the "Mayflower" company. He 
bought a very large tract of land, mostly in 
what is now Halifax, Mass., but extending 
into Middleboro, where he built his house. 
His gun, seven feet, four and a half inches in 



length, and his sword, measuring three feet, 
five and one-half inches, are amongthe inter- 
esting relics in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, 
Mass. A statue commemorative of him has 
been erected by the Thompsons at Halifax, 
Mass. Some of his descendants settled in 
Nova Scotia. 

John Thompson, father of William A., was 
a shoemaker by trade, and was also a country 
schoolmaster. Marrying late in life, he set- 
tled in Medford about the year 1853. He 
reared two sons and three daughters, William 
A., the subject of this sketch, being the sec- 
ond-born child. Mr. Thompson's father and 
mother both died several years ago. His 
brother James, a designer by profession, is a 
clerk in his office. He served through the 
war of the Rebellion, in Company C, Thirty- 
ninth Massachusetts Volunteers, and was 
wounded at Weldon Railroad. His eldest 
sister is married, and resides in Arlington; 
the other sisters who, also, are married, live 
in Medford. 

William A. Thompson in his youth at- 
tended the common schools of Medford and 
the English High School in Boston, continu- 
ing to advance in learning by studying even- 
ings while working in the daytime. When 
sixteen years old he began to serve an appren- 
ticeship at the jeweller's trade with Clarkson 
& Brooks, manufacturing jewellers, Boston, 
and, after becoming a journeyman, he was 
employed by Luther F. Brooks as foreman for 
ten years. So anxious was he to make further 
progress in his studies, even after he was 
twenty-one years old, that he attended evening 
school for some time at the Lowell Institute, 
and was a student at the Normal Art School 
after his marriage. He received a diploma 
which would enable him to teach, but he pre- 
fers to apply his artistic ability to his busi- 
ness. When thirty years old he engaged in 
business in company with a partner, whose 
interest he purchased some three years later; 
and for the past seventeen years he has been 
alone. Besides retailing jewelry and precious 
stones, especially diamonds, he keeps on hand 
artistic specimens of his own work; and he 
also designs and manufactures special work per 
order, a particular branch of the business in 
which he has acquired a wide reputation. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Thompson is president of the Board of 
Aldermen of the city of Medford. He is con- 
nected with Mount Hermon Lodge, F. & 
A. M., and Mystic Council, Royal Arcanum; 
was president for two years and is now a trus- 
tee of the Medford Club; and was president of 
the Art Club three years. He is a member of 
the Unitarian church. 

At the age of twenty-three Mr. Thompson 
married Dora A. Sampson, daughter of James 
P. and Lucy S. Sampson. He has had four 
children — Grace Adelaide, Leroy Stetson 
(deceased), Leslie Prince, and Blanch Far- 
well. The second-born, Leroy S., died in 
1894, aged twenty -one years. 

Mr. Thompson's scientific studies have 
been utilized to good advantage in his busi- 
ness; and he is not only an original designer, 
but is capable of smelting and refining gold as 
well as working it into any shape desired. 
He is also an excellent artist in water colors, 
and several of his paintings have been ad- 
mired at various art exhibits in Boston. 



IDWARD EVERETT THOMPSON, 
third Mayor of Woburn and now chair- 
man of the Sinking F'und Commis- 
sion, was born in North Woburn, December 
18, 1826. He is a son of Charles and Mary 
(Wyman) Thompson and a descendant in the 
seventh generation of James Thompson, who 
came over with Governor Winthrop. 

James Thompson, who was born in England 
'" iS93i settled in Charlestown, Mass. His 
son, Jonathan Thompson, first, married Su- 
sannah Blodgett, of Cambridge, and settled 
in Woburn. Jonathan Thompson, second, was 
born in Woburn, September 28, 1663. He 
married Frances, daughter of Francis Whit- 
more, of Cambridge; and his son Samuel, an- 
cestor of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Woburn, September 8, 1705. Samuel 
Thompson married Ruth, daughter of Josiah 
Wright, and a great-grand-daughter of Captain 
John Carter. Abijah Thompson, their third 
son, grandfather of Edward E. , was born in 
Woburn, April 11, 1739. He fought in the 
French and Indian War, was one of the min- 
ute-men who responded to the Lexington 
alarm on April 19, 1775, and served as an 



armorer in the Revolutionary War. For many 
years he held the office of Deputy Sheriff. 
He was three times married. 

Charles Thompson, his eldest son by his 
third wife, Mrs. Sarah Stanley Burt, a widow, 
was born in Woburn, November 25, 1780, 
and died here May 16, 1869. He followed 
the trade of a blacksmith during his active 
years. He was for a long period a Deacon 
of the First Congregational Church, and took 
a prominent part in church work. Mary 
Wyman, his wife, whom he married June 19, 
1802, was the youngest of nine children born 
to Samuel and Catherine (Fowle) Wyman, of 
Woburn. She became the mother of nine 
children, two of whom are living, namely: 
Abijah, who served in the Civil War, and 
is still conducting business here; and Ed- 
ward E., the subject of this sketch. Another 
son, the Rev. Leander Thompson, A.M., 
who was born March 7, 1812, and prepared 
for college at Warren Academy, was grad- 
uated from Amherst with the class of 1835 
and from the Andover Theological Seminary 
in 1838. After spending a number of years 
abroad, a part of the time in travel and the 
remainder as a missionary at Beirut, Syria, he 
returned to the United States, and was pastor 
of the church at South Hadley, Mass., eight 
years and at West Amesbury, now Merrimac, 
thirteen years. He married Ann Eliza Avery, 
only daughter of Samuel and Mary (Clark) 
Avery, of Wolfboro, N. H.,and was the father 
of six children, one of whom is living. The 
Rev. Leander Thompson was the author of 
the " Memorial of James Thompson and his 
Descendants." He died in 1896. 

Edward Everett Thompson, after complet- 
ing his studies at the Woburn Grammar 
School, engaged in mercantile business at 
North Woburn in company with his brother 
Abijah. In 1861 he was chosen a member of 
the Board of Selectmen ; and, as the town 
business during the war time required a great 
deal of attention, and as his brother had en- 
tered the army, he decided to dispose of his 
store and devote his entire time to his official 
duties. For seventeen years he served as a 
Selectman, was chairman of the board one 
year and clerk twelve years. He was clerk of 
the Water Board and registrar ten years, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



elected a Representative to the legislature in 
1 871, and for seventeen years has been a special 
County Commissioner. In 1889 he was 
elected to the first Common Council under the 
city charter, serving as its president until 
1891, when he was chosen the third Mayor of 
the city. It was during his administration 
that the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of the settlement of Woburn was observed. 
Mr. Thompson is now chairman of the Sinking 
Fund Commission. For the last eighteen 
years he has been trustee and treasurer of the 
Five Cent Savings Bank. He is acting in the 
same capacity for the Warren Academy Fund, 
is chairman of the Board of Trustees of the 
Home for Aged Women, is a director of the 
Rumford Historical Association, and has acted 
as a Justice of the Peace for the past thirty- 
six years. He voted for John C. Fremont in 
1856, and has since preserved his firm alle- 
giance to the Republican party. 

On September 9, 1848, Mr. Thompson was 
united in marriage with Sarah S. Hackett, 
daughter of Ephraim and Lois Hackett, of 
Wilton, N. H. Mrs. Thompson is the mother 
of two daughters, namely: Annie E. , born in 
1854; and Lillian T., born April 28, 1858. 
Both are graduates of the Woburn High School. 
Annie E. Thompson was married to Charles 
M. Strout on February 16, 1876, and has two 
children — Charles E. B. and Percy T. Lil- 
lian T. Thompson is now the wife of C. 
Willard Smith, of this city, and has four chil- 
dren — Edith Lillian, George Willard, Mar- 
guerite, and May Jeanette. 

Mr. Thompson has served as a Deacon of 
the First Congregational Church fifteen 
years, has been collector and treasurer of the 
parish for twenty years, has been superintend- 
ent of the First Congregational Sunday-school 
for ten years, has served in the same capacity 
at the North Church five years, and is a mem- 
ber of the Church Aid Committee of the 
Woburn Conference. 



ANIEL A. GLEASON, of West 
Medford, sometime State Treasurer 
of Massachusetts, was born in the 
city of Worcester, Worcester 
County, May 9, 1S36, son of John F. and 



Maria (Tourtelotte) Gleason. His immigrant 
ancestor, Thomas Gleason, took the oath of 
allegiance at Watertown in 1652. He had 
several sons, from whom are descended the 
numerous Gleasons in New England. Daniel 
A. Gleason descends through John, of Sud- 
bury, who died in 1689 or 1690. John's son 
Thomas, who was for a time a resident of 
Marlboro, took up land in Worcester in 1718, 
but was living in Shrewsbury in 1723. In 
1726 he moved back to Worcester, and he 
died there in 1755. 

Isaac, son of the second Thomas, was born 
in Worcester, and died there in 1776, aged 
fifty-two. When the New England forces 
mustered for the Revolutionary struggle, two 
companies came from Worcester to enter 
battle, Isaac Gleason being a member of one 
company, and his son Jonathan of another 
company. Jonathan married Mary Fiske. 
He died in 1826, aged about eighty-two 
years. John Gleason, Daniel A. Gleason's 
grandfather, who was a son of Jonathan, was 
born in 1773, and died in 1823. His wife 
was Mary Simonds. 

John F. Gleason; son of John, was born in 
1807. He was a builder by trade and a resi- 
dent of Worcester. Actively interested in 
politics, he served as a member of the city 
government and as a Representative to the 
legislature, being in the House that elected 
Charles Sumner to the United States Senate 
in 1851. 

Daniel A. Gleason obtained his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Worcester, fit- 
ting for college in the Worcester High 
School. In the fall of 1852 he entered Yale, 
but in the winter of 1853 he went to Har- 
vard, where he was graduated in the class of 
1856. He subsequently taught three years in 
Meadville, Pa., and, in the meantime reading 
law, was admitted to the bar in Crawford 
County, Pennsylvania. In the fall of 1859 he 
entered the Law School at Cambridge, and in 
i860 he took the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Studying for a year in Chandler & Shattuck's 
office, he was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 
1 861, and immediately began to practise in 
Boston. He was drawn into public life 
almost as soon as qualified for his profes- 
sion, becoming assistant to Attorney-general 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Dwight Foster, with whom he was associated 
during 1862 and a part of 1S63. In 1864 he 
moved to Medford, and about the same time 
was put in charge of the State Tax Commis- 
sioner's office. He remained there until 
1 88 1, and in the meantime, in 1872, he was 
made Commissioner of Corporations, a post 
which he held until elected State Treasurer. 
Assuming the duties of this office in January, 
1 88 1, he was the incumbent five years, the 
length of time allowed by law for one man to 
remain. Retiring in January, 1886, he re- 
sumed his professional work, and was for some 
time engaged in general practice, making a 
specialty of corporation law. He is now 
treasurer of the Fitchburg Railroad Company, 
having been appointed in March, 1887. Mr. 
Gleason has been a member of the Investment 
Committee of the Medford Savings Bank from 
the time of its incorporation (it was char- 
tered in 1869) and a member of the Board of 
Trustees. He served on the School Commit- 
tee in Medford from 1864 to 1885, presiding 
as chairman of the board the last eighteen 
years; and he was on the Board of Water 
Commissioners from 1869 to 1892, acting on 
the committee which built the water-works of 
Medford. 

Mr. Gleason was married in January, 1863, 
to Miss Annie L. Hall, of Roxbury, and has 
five children, namely: Hall, a civil engi- 
neer; Sidney, clerk in the banking house of 
Kidder, Peabody & Co., Boston; Elizabeth, 
wife of Edward T. Bigelow; Annie; and 
Charles Bemis. Charles B. Gleason was re- 
cently admitted to the bar, but is not yet in 
practice. Mr. Gleason is a member of Mount 
Hermon Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and Mystic 
R. A. Chapter. He belongs also to the 
Union Club of Boston, the New England His- 
toric Genealogical Society, and the Medford 
Historical Society. One of the oldest public 
men of Medford, he has an enviable reputa- 
tion, commanding the respect of all his fellow- 
citizens. 



/^PTeQRGE H. GILBERT, a retired 

\J3 I merchant, who occupies an estate in 

Winchester known as Sunnyside, 

was born in North Andover, Mass., April 24, 



1841. He is a son of George H. and Phebe 
Johnson (Farnham) Gilbert, and is said to be 
a descendant of Sir Humphrey Gilbert, the 
navigator. 

His father, who was a native of Brooklyn, 
Conn., became a prominent woollen manufact- 
urer of Massachusetts, having factories in 
Ware, Hampshire County, this State, and at 
Gilbertville, Worcester County, which was 
named in his honor. He was a progressive as 
well as an extensive manufacturer. In 185 1 
he took the first premium for the finest flannel 
exhibited at the World's Fair in the famous 
Crystal Palace in London, and he received the 
same award at the World's Fair subsequently 
held in New York. He was identified with 
the business and public affairs of Ware, repre- 
senting that town in the legislature, and serv- 
ing as a State Senator two terms. The indus- 
trial development of the town was largely due 
to his energy and ability. He was an active 
member of the Congregational church for 
many years, or until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1869, at the age of sixty-three. A 
beautiful church completed in 1870 at Gil- 
bertville, Mass., built of Monson granite and 
costing thirty thousand dollars, was erected 
by his family as a fitting monument to his 
memory. He purchased and presented to 
Amherst College the largest collection of 
Indian relics in the country, known as the 
Gilbert Museum; and, aside from his contri- 
butions to public charities, his benevolence 
alleviated much suffering among the poor. 

In 1839 George H. Gilbert, Sr., married 
for his first wife Phebe Johnson Farnham, of 
North Andover, daughter of Deacon Jedediah 
Farnham and grand-daughter of Captain Will- 
iam Johnson, who served in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. She died May 7, 1841, leaving 
one son, George H., the subject of this sketch. 
For his second wife George H. Gilbert, Sr., 
married Elizabeth J. Hooker, of Enfield, 
Mass., a cousin of General Joseph Hooker. 
Of this union were born five children; 
namely, Charles D., Mary L., J. H. Grenville 
Gilbert, Phebe Farnham, and Edward Hooker 
Gilbert. Of these the survivors are: Mary 
L. , now Mrs. James H. Hinsdale, of Pitts- 
field, Mass. ; J. H. Grenville Gilbert; and 
Colonel Edward Hooker Gilbert, who sue- 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceeded to the business in Ware. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth J. H. Gilbert is no longer living. 

Left motherless when but two weeks old, 
George H. Gilbert, the subject of this sketch, 
in his early years was tenderly cared for by 
Miss Lavinia Farnham, his aunt, who was 
warmly attached to him, and for whom he 
conceived the love and devotion of a son. 
He graduated at Williston Seminary, East- 
hampton, Mass., but instead of entering col- 
lege he went to New York City for the 
purpose of learning the dry-goods commission 
business. In 1869 he engaged in banking, 
and two years later he retired. He at one 
time received a unanimous nomination for 
State Senator in New York, but declined the 
honor. For a number of years he was a resi- 
dent of Boston, and since May, 1890, has re- 
sided in Winchester at Sunnyside. Mr. Gil- 
bert is unmarried, and for many years devoted 
his principal attention to the comfort and hap- 
piness of his mother's two sisters who resided 
with him. Mrs. Susan J. Smith, the elder, 
died Januarys, 1892; and the younger, Miss 
Lavinia Farnham, above mentioned, who was 
born August 16, 1806, died February 10, 
1894. Mr. Gilbert will probably never re- 
cover frbm the severe blow inflicted by the 
loss of this aunt, his foster-mother, whose 
memory is to him the dearest recollection on 
earth. A book, issued by him as a memorial 
of her goodness and extreme piety, contains 
letters of consolation from many well-known 
clergymen all over the United States, who 
speak in the highest terms of her noble quali- 
ties of heart and mind. 

Mr. Gilbert is an admirer of fine horses, 
and he drives considerably for the benefit of 
his health. He is a lover of the fine arts, and 
has several rare paintings executed by old 
masters. He possesses literary tastes, owns 
many choice books, is an interesting conversa- 
tionalist, and he entertains hospitably and 
liberally. He united with the Park Street 
Congregational Society, Boston, about twenty- 
five years ago, and still retains a pew in that 
church. He acted as chairman of the Parish 
Committee of the Congregational church in 
Winchester during the first few years of his 
residence here, but at the present time he is a 
regular attendant of the First Church of Wo- 



burn, of which the Rev. Drs. March and Sud- 
der are ministers. 



/pTEORGE WASHINGTON BUTTERS, 
V|i) I one of the best known market gar- 
^-"^ deners of Newton, was born Novem- 
ber 5, 181 1, in Boston, on Prince Street, one 
of the historic thoroughfares of the North 
End, wherein were enacted many exciting 
scenes at the commencement of the Revolu- 
tionary War. His parents were Joshua and 
Susanna (Peters) Butters, the latter a daughter 
of Israel Peters, of Burlington. The Butters 
family is of Scotch origin, and descends from 
ancestry who were originally of the nobility, 
and fought under Robert Bruce at the battle 
of Bannockburn. The first American ances- 
tor was William Butters (first), who, born in 
Scotland in 1630, emigrated to New England 
in 1666, and served in King Philip's War. 
He became the owner of considerable real es- 
tate in what was later incorporated as Wil- 
mington, Mass., where he resided. His son, 
William Butters (second), was the father of 
William Butters (third), who was the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch. 

James Butters, George W. Butters's grand- 
father, inherited the homestead portion of his 
grandfather's estate, and was a prosperous 
farmer and fruit-grower. He furnished Colo- 
nel Baldwin with the scions which produced 
the first specimens of the now famous Baldwin 
apple. On April 19, 1775, he marched to 
Lexington as a member of Captain Timothy 
Walker's company, in Colonel Greer's regi- 
ment; and in September, 1778, he was in Cap- 
tain Elijah Small's company, of Major Zenas 
Thurston's regiment, and responded to alarms 
sent out from Bradford and Falmouth. He 
married Abigail Butterfield. Joshua Butters, 
George W. Butters's father, was born in Wil- 
mington in 1779. He learned the currier's 
trade, and after settling in Boston he became 
a surveyor of wood and bark. On September 
12, 1814, he enlisted in the Third Regiment, 
Massachusetts Militia, under Captain Theo- 
dore Paige and Colonel Amos Berney. In 
politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat. He 
attended the Unitarian church. Susanna, his 




HENRY H. HUNT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife, whom he married June i, 1806, became 
the mother of five children. 

George Washington Butters attended the 
Boston public schools until he was eleven 
years old. Then he went to work ujjon a farm 
in Lexington, where he remained five years, 
completing his education in the town schools. 
He spent the next three years in Waltham, 
employed in farming, and the succeeding five 
years in Watertown, learning market garden- 
ing with Joshua Coolidge. Returning once 
more to Waltham, he resided there two years; 
and then, having leased the Ward farm of 
eighty-five acres, situated in the neighborhood 
of Jamaica Pond in the town of Brookline, he 
was engaged in general farming and the culti- 
vation of vegetables for nineteen years. In 
December, 1856, he moved to Newton, set- 
tling upon a farm of eighty acres. The twenty- 
seven acres of that property he now owns is 
located on Nahanton Street, in the Fifth Ward. 
For upward of forty years he has made a spe- 
cialty of market gardening, and during this 
time has witnessed the growth and development 
of Newton from a small town to the handsome 
and flourishing municipality it is now. 

Mr. Butters contracted the first of his three 
marriages in 1836 with. Lucy Ann Smith, 
daughter of Elijah and Anna Smith, of 
Waltham, and who died in 1841. His second 
marriage was performed in 1843 with Sarah 
A. Putnam, daughter of Benjamin and Doro- 
thy Putnam, of Waltham, and who died in 
1844. His third marriage, in 1856, united 
him to Sarah, daughter of the Rev. Thomas 
Andrews, of Berkley, Mass. She died in 
1890. By his first union there are two sons: 
George W., Jr., born in 1837; and Charles 
H., born in 1839. Edward Francis, born in 
1844, was the offspring of his second mar- 
riage. The three children were educated in 
Brookline. George W. Butters, who resides 
with his father and assists upon the farm, 
married Charlotte Augusta Crane in January, 
1897. Charles H. and Edward Francis 
Butters are both engaged in farming in Frank- 
lin, Mass. They married sisters, Catherine 
and Louisa Smith, respectively, daughters of 
Philip Smith, of Newton. In politics Mr. 
Butters, Sr., acted with the Democratic party 
until 1856, when he joined the Republican 



party. He cast his first vote for the re-elec- 
tion of President Jackson in 1832, and assisted 
in electing Nathaniel P. Banks to the legislat- 
ure. On June 17, 1824, he walked to Boston 
to witness the ceremony of laying the corner- 
stone of Bunker Hill monument, on which 
memorable occasion he saw General Lafay- 
ette and Andrew Jackson, and heard Daniel 
Webster deliver his famous oration. 



ENRY HERBERT HUNT, contrac- 
tor and builder, whose work is seen 
in many of the finest public build- 
ings of Newton and vicinity, was 
born in 1847 in Brunswick, Me., and comes 
from one of the old families of that State. 
His father was Jeremiah Hunt, a native of 
Brunswick, Me., a well-known ship-builder of 
former days ; and his grandfather Hunt was 
Jeremiah, Sr., who was a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

Jeremiah Hunt, the younger, was actively 
engaged in ship-building at Brunswick until 
the financial panic of 1857, when he retired 
from business. His wife, Salome Woodside, 
was the daughter of George and Susan (Dun- 
ning) Woodside. Her father served in the 
War of 1812. Her mother was doubtless a 
descendant of Andrew Dunning, who is 
spoken of in the History of Brunswick, Tops- 
ham, and Harpswell, as the ancestor of all 
the Dunnings in that vicinity and probably of 
all of this name in the State of Maine. He 
came from Ashburton, Devonshire, England, 
with his wife and five sons, and settled at 
Brunswick in 1717. He was evidently a 
scion of the same stock as the eminent lawyer, 
John Dunning, the first Lord Ashburton, who 
was a native of the same place, Ashburton, 
Devonshire, England, born in 1731. 

Jeremiah and Salome (Woodside) Hunt had 
five children, three of whom, besides the sub- 
ject of this sketch, are now living, namely: 
Mary G., who married W. E. B. Ryder, of 
Newton Highlands; Helen S., who married 
Robert M. Mountfort, and now resides at Ta- 
coma, Wash.; and Albion W. , who married 
Laura Roberts, and lives on the old home- 
stead at Brunswick. 

Mr. Henry H. Hunt, having acquired a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



common-school education in his youth, 
worked for three years at ship-building with 
his father in Bath and Brunswick. He then 
spent two years in Portland, learning the 
trade of house building, at which he subse- 
quently worked for some time in Boston. He 
came to Newton in 1871, and has since re- 
sided in this city, conducting an extensive 
business in contracting and building, also 
manufacturing materials for builders an^ run- 
ning a mill. 

Among the many specimens of his good 
workmanship are the Claflin Grammar School 
building, built in 1890, Claflin Block at 
Newtonville, the engine house at Newton 
Centre, the Waltham almshouse, the Church 
of the Messiah (Episcopal) at Auburndale, 
and the Masonic Temple at Newtonville. 
His large business contracts demand the em- 
ployment of about one hundred and ten men 
for the entire year. 

He married in 1872 Emma F., daughter of 
Isaac and Charlotte Frogley, of West Newton, 
and by this union had two children — ^ Rich- 
ard H. and Helen M. Richard H., born in 
1875, was educated in the Newton schools, 
and, graduating from the high school in 1893, 
entered Harvard University in the fall of the 
same year. Helen M., born in 1877, was 
graduated at the high school in the class of 
1894, and is now at home. Their mother 
died in 1879; and in 1882 Mr. Hunt married 
Czarina J., daughter of Gearfield Learned, of 
West Newton. Two children have been born 
of this marriage, namely: Harry L., in 1889; 
and Marguerite, in 1893. 

In politics Mr. Hunt is a Democrat. He 
was a member of the Common Council from 
Ward Three in 1887, was on the Board of 
Aldermen during the years of 1893 and 1894, 
serving as chairman of the Committee on 
Sewers for two years, and was re-elected to 
the Board of Aldermen in the fall of 1897. 
He attends the Baptist church, and is a liberal 
contributor toward its support. He is a mem- 
ber of the Dalhousie Lodge, F. & A. M., the 
Newton R. A. Chapter, and the Gethsemane 
Commandery, K. T., all at Newtonville; and 
the Boston Consistory, thirty-second degree. 
He is connected with several beneficiary 
organizations. 



ViV» ki 



LLIAM H. SHEDD, Selectman of 
East Chelmsford, was born in At- 
;inson, N.H., April 13, 1852, son 
of Jacob Henry and Lydia C. (Thomas) 
Shedd. His grandparents were Jacob and 
Clarissa (Carter) Shedd, natives respectively 
of Tewksbury and Wilmington, Mass. The 
father, who was born in Wilmington, while a 
shoemaker by trade, found other means of 
earning a living. For some time he drove a 
baker's team; and he was in the provision 
business on Leverett Street, Boston, for a 
while. In 1854 he moved to Woburn, and he 
was residing in that town while he was in 
business in Boston. He died in 1864, at the 
age of thirty-eight, of a cold contracted in an 
ice chest. His wife, whom he married in 
Atkinson, died December 25, 1891, aged 
sixty-five. They were the parents of five chil- 
dren : Clara, who died at the age of fifteen ; 
William H., the subject of this sketch; 
Jennie L., the wife of Granville Grush, who 
is the superintendent for the Dorchester Gas 
Company; Nellie D. , residing in Lowell- 
and Harry L., a market gardener of South 
Lowell. 

William H. Shedd hired out as a farm hand 
at the age of thirteen. When he was fifteen 
years old he was driving a milk cart in Low- 
ell. Afterward he drove a milk wagon in 
Maiden and East Cambridge, Mass., and 
worked for five years as a moulder in a Lowell 
machine shop. In 1875 he bought a milk 
route at Lowell. Starting with about seven 
hundred dollars, in two years and a half from 
that time he had eighteen hundred. He then 
started in the produce business, under the firm 
name of Shedd & Griffin; but, failing to 
realize a fair profit, he sold out after a 
few months. Purchasing then another milk 
route, he gradually increased his business 
until he sold an average of one hundred and 
twenty-five cans a day, and kept three teams. 
In the meantime he purchased the farm at 
East Chelmsford which he now occupies, and, 
in company with his brother Harry, engaged 
in market gardening, growing early vegetables 
under glass. This proved so profitable that 
he eventually sold out his milk route, and 
gave his whole attention to forcing vegetables. 
He was associated with his brother for three 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years. Since that time he has managed an 
independent business. His farm covers fifty 
acres, four or five of which are devoted to rais- 
ing small fruits. His hot -houses are heated 
by furnace. He also owns some real estate in 
Lowell. He has built a handsome residence 
on a commanding eminence, with a grand 
view of the surrounding country. His im- 
provements cost some five thousand, five hun- 
dred dollars. 

On November 24, 1887, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Annie Grace Carleton, 
daughter of Samuel B. and Martha (Gray) 
Carleton. Born in West Boxford, Mass., she 
was reared on a farm in that town, and lived 
for some years in Lowell with a sister. Mr= 
and Mrs. Shedd have two children — Lydia 
Helen and Henry Carleton. Mr. Shedd, who 
is a Republican, is serving his fourth year on 
the Board of Selectmen. He belongs to 
Oberlin Lodge, No. 28, L O. O. F., of 
Lowell; and to Wannalansett Encampment of 
that city. Of a sporting family, he is an en- 
thusiastic fox hunter, and keeps a good pack 
of hounds. Often, with two or three old 
friends, he enjoys days of sport in New Hamp- 
shire; and he has many trophies of the chase. 



]C]dWARD DANA BENNETT, formerly 
R Town Treasurer of Burlington, was 
"^■^ ■ ' born in this town, April 6, 1872, son 
of George and Mary (Foster) Bennett. His 
grandfather, George Bennett, first, was a life- 
long resident of Burlington, where he tilled 
the soil during his active years. Mr. Ben- 
nett's father has carried on general farming 
since his youth, and is still residing here. 
His wife, Mary Foster Bennett, was born in 
Dublin, N.H., being a daughter of Edward 
Foster. 

Edward Dana Bennett is distinctively a na- 
tive product, as he was reared and educated in 
this his native town. He assisted his father 
in carrying on the homestead farm until 1895, 
since which time he has been Superintendent 
of Streets. He is a bright and active young 
man, with progressive tendencies, and is re- 
garded as one of the most promising among 
the younger generation. He has served with 
ability as a Selectman since 1893, is a mem- 



ber of the Board of Assessors, is Overseer of 
the Poor, and has served as Town Treasurer at 
the last election. Politically, he is a Repub- 
lican. 



(r= 



HARLES EMERSON, shoe manufact- 
urer, who has long been identified 
with the industrial progress of the 
town of Stoneham, was born in 
Reading, Mass., June i, 1816. His parents 
were John and Nancy (Wiley) Emerson. The 
Emersons were among the early settlers of 
Reading. John Emerson, Charles Emerson's 
grandfather, was a native and a lifelong resi- 
dent of Reading. Besides working at his 
trade of cooper, he managed a farm. A Rev- 
olutionary soldier, he was in action at Ticon- 
deroga. He married a Miss Beard. 

John Emerson, Jr., was born in Reading, in 
the neighborhood of his father's birthplace, 
and in the same house that sheltered his son's 
infancy. He was a butcher by trade, and 
spent his life in Reading. A prominent citi- 
zen, he was for a number of years in office 
as Deputy Sheriff. He died at the age of 
eighty-four. His wife was about fifty-five 
years old when she died. They reared eight 
children: Charles, the subject of this sketch; 
Andrew, deceased; George, residing in Pea- 
body, Mass.; Brooks, living in Lynn, Mass.; 
Adams, twin brother of Brooks, deceased; 
Orrin, residing on Wright Street, Stoneham; 
William, in Plaistow, N.H. ; and Nancy, de- 
ceased. 

Charles Emerson was educated in his native 
town. After learning the shoemaker's trade, 
he worked at it as a journeyman for about five 
years. At the age of twenty-six he began 
to manufacture women's shoes in Stoneham. 
Persevering in this enterprise, he gradually 
built up a prosperous business, and became 
one of the leading shoe manufacturers in Mid- 
dlesex County. He was in active business 
until over seventy years of age. His present 
home, on the street named in his honor, was 
built by him some forty-five years ago. The 
land on which it stands was originally in- 
tended for the site of a town house, and Mr. 
Emerson purchased it of the town of Stone- 
ham. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On May i, 1841, Mr. Emerson was married 
to Anna H., daughter of Eli and Anna H. 
(Wtieeler) Noble, of Stoneham. Their union 
has been blessed by the following children: 
Charles C, who died at the age of twenty- 
one; Albert O., residing in Stoneham; and 
Abbie, now the widow of Nathan Green. Al- 
bert Emerson married Miss Elizabeth Mullen, 
and has one daughter, Mary Anna. Mrs. 
Green has one child living, Charles A. Mr. 
Emerson cast his first Presidential vote in 
1840. He was a member of the Whig party 
in early manhood, and has been a member of 
the Republican party since its birth. 



lARCUS M. RUSSELL, a well- 
known citizen of Newton, Mass., 
engaged in market gardening, 
was born in 1840 at Arlington, 
his parents being Amos and Lois Stearns 
(Pierce) Russell. The first ancestor of the 
Russell family in this country was one Will- 
iam Russell. Amos Russell, who was born in 
Arlington in 1804, died in Cambridgeport in 
1892. He was a farmer of Arlington. His 
wife, who was a daughter of Sibyl Pierce, died 
December 23, 1S97, at the age of seventy- 
seven years. Amos Russell and his wife were 
the parents of eleven children. Of these 
Sibyl P., who was the wife of George An- 
drews, died in 1896. The others are: 
Amos W. , who has retired from business and 
resides in Cambridge; Theodore L., now at 
Belmont, in the grocery business; Marcus M., 
the subject of this sketch; Ellen A., now 
Mrs. John Phillips, of Waverley, Mass. ; John 
H., a commercial traveller, who makes his 
home in Cambridg-e ; Loring P., who is a 
baker in Maiden ; Henry Herbert, a grocer of 
Waverley, Mass. ; Alden D., who is in the con- 
fectionery business at Cambridgeport; Elmer 
A., a manufacturing confectioner of Cam- 
bridgeport; and Etta L. , who is an assistant 
librarian at Cambridgeport. 

Mr. Russell was named for Governor Mar- 
cus Morton, who was elected Governor in the 
year of the former's birth. He was educated 
in the public schools of Arlington. At the 
age of twenty-one he went to work for Isaac 
Kingsbury, of Chestnut Hill, for whom he 



drove a market wagon for some nine years. 
Then he went into the business of market gar- 
dening for himself, and he has since followed 
that occupation, making a specialty of small 
fruits. He also does an extensive commission 
business in the same line. 

Mr. Russell is a member of numerous bene- 
ficiary organizations, of the Veteran Fireman's 
Association of Newton, and of the Episcopal 
church at Chestnut Hill. In politics he is a 
Republican. In 1871 he was married to 
Sarah L. , daughter of Captain Samuel Whit- 
ney, a sea captain of Sebec, Me. Her grand- 
father, Richard Whitney, was a soldier in 
the War of 1812. Martha Whitney, wife of 
Richard, was a daughter of Hezekiah Flan- 
ders, of Salisbury, Me., who served through 
the Revolutionary War as Sergeant. The 
Whitney family, which has long been settled 
in Maine, came originally from England. 
Tlie children of Mr. and Mrs. Russell are: 
Alfred M., Arthur Stearns, Walter T., and 
Amos L. Alfred M., who was born in 1872, 
received a good general education in the New- 
ton public schools, and afterward graduated at 
Hall's Commercial School in Boston. He is 
now assistant clerk at City Hall and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health. He married 
Clara, daughter of Edward Stanley, of Newton 
Centre, and resides in Newtonville. They 
have one son, Arthur Morton. Arthur 
Stearns, who was born in 1874, is with 
Parker, Holmes & Co., wholesale boot and 
shoe merchants of Boston. Walter T. , born 
in 1876, resides with his parents. Amos L., 
born in 1878, is with the Butterfield Company 
of Boston. 



7TXHARLES A. LIBBY, M.D., a prac- 
I SX rising physician of Arlington, Mass., 
^^js^^ was born in Limington, Me., Au- 
gust 15, 1 85 1, son of Shirley and 
Mary E. (Smclair) Libby. He is a lineal 
descendant of John Libby, born in England 
about 1602, who came to America in 1630, 
and settled in Scarboro, Me., becoming a 
prominent citizen of that locality. 

By his first wife John Libby had ten chil- 
dren, of whom David, born in 1657, was the 
youngest; and by his second wife, Mary, he 




MARCUS M. RUSSELL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had two children. David Libby was a well- 
to-do farmer of Scarboro. He and his wife, 
Eleanor, had a family of nine children. Their 
fifth child, John, born, probably in Ports- 
mouth, N.H., about 1697, married November 
14, 1724, Sarah Libby, who bore him seven 
children. 

Nathaniel, born September 5, 1735, the 
fifth of this family group, married on Decem- 
ber 19, 1759, Mary Meserve, and had twelve 
children. He died October 18, 1789, and his 
wife died May 13, 1802. Luke Libby, son 
of Nathaniel and Mary, was born in Scarboro, 
February 2, 1780, and was throughout his life 
a farmer in that town. He fought in the war 
with the Indians. He died March 23, 1858, 
and his wife, Susanna Mathews, died Febru- 
ary 12, 1852. They had nine children, Shir- 
ley, above named, being the seventh. One 
son, George P., is living. 

Shirley Libby was born in Scarboro, Janu- 
ary 13, 1813, and died in 1874. At the age of 
twenty-five he removed from Scarboro to Lim- 
ington, and, purchasing the homestead of his 
uncle, settled there as a farmer. He was mar- 
ried to his first wife, who was a native of 
Waterboro, Me., and whose baptismal name 
was Mary, on April 18, 1839. She died Oc- 
tober 17, 1869, at the age of fifty-si.x; and on 
April I, 1870, he married for his second 
wife Mrs. Lizzie J. Butterfield, born Harri- 
son. His children, all by his first marriage, 
were: Lucy Ellen, Mary Susan, Lewis Sin- 
clair, George Franklin, Charles A., Eunice 
M., and Lizzie A. Lucy Ellen, the eldest, 
now deceased, was born January 19, 1840, and 
was married May 13, 1865, to James F. 
Small, of Scarboro. Her two children were: 
M. Catherine and James. Mary Susan, born 
December 26, 1841, married August i, i86g, 
Silas Hubbard. Lewis S. Libby was a pri- 
vate in the late war in the Thirtieth Maine 
Regiment, and was lost at sea on his way 
home. George F. , born December 8, 1848, 
married on May 17, 1876, Clara Elizabeth, 
daughter of Alfred B. and Mary A. (Swett) 
Marston, of Falmouth, Me. He has three 
children, namely: Mabel L., born May 30, 
1877, i" Limington, Me.; Bertha May, born 
October 11, 1879, in Falmouth, Me.; and 
Charles. Eunice M., born April 20, 1856, 



married Edward Cooper, and has four chil- 
dren. Lizzie A., born January 19, i860, 
died unmarried. Four of this family of seven 
are living. 

Charles A. Libby was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town and at Lim- 
ington Academy. Starting out to make his 
own way in the world, he came to Massachu- 
setts, and shortly after arriving in Boston he 
went to work as a gardener in Melrose. He 
remained there a few years, beginning the 
study of medicine in 1870 with Dr. J. H. 
Smith, of that town. Later on, from March, 
1872, to November of that year, he studied 
with a physician in Maiden. He finally en- 
tered the New York Homoeopathic Medical 
College, and was graduated from that institu- 
tion, March 27, 1873. In the following May 
he settled in Arlington, and since that time 
he has acquired a large share of the practice 
of Arlington and vicinity, has won for him- 
self the reputation of being skilful and reli- 
able, and by his genial personality has made 
many warm friends. 

Dr. Libby married on December 16, 1874, 
Maria H., daughter of Captain James and 
Susan (Parker) Small, of Deering, Me. The 
Doctor is connected with the Massachusetts 
Homoeopathic Medical Society. He is a mem- 
ber of Hiram Lodge, F. & A. M., of Arling- 
ton ; of Boston Commandery, K. T. ; and of 
Bethel Lodge, No. 12, I. O. O. F., of Arling- 
ton. He is also a member of the Arlington 
Boat Club. In politics he is an Independent, 
in religious views liberal. He is highly es- 
teemed as a citizen, and, as already stated, 
stands high in his profession. 



yjDWARD J. CARR, one of the town 
Fl fathers of Carlisle, was born in New 
'^^ ™ ^ Ipswich, N.H., July 23, 1843, son 
of Emory and Abigail (Rice) Carr. He is of 
the fourth generation in descent from Thomas 
Carr, Jr., of Sudbury, Mass., who served as a 
soldier in the American Revolution, and 
whose father was Thomas Carr, Sr. 

John Carr, a farmer of Sudbury, son of the 
younger Thomas and grandfather of Mr. Carr 
of Carlisle, served in the War of 1812. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lived to about fourscore years of age. His 
wife was Dorcas Haynes, a native of Sudbury. 

Their son, Emory Carr, was born in Sud- 
bury, April 3, 1798. He was a farmer, resid- 
ing for a number of years in New Ipswich, 
N.H, He died at the age of eighty-two. 
His wife, who was born in Stow, Middlesex 
County, Mass., September 30, 1800, was a 
daughter of Solomon and Ruth (Maynard) 
Rice. Mr. Rice was born in Concord, Mass., 
and lived for some time in Sudbury, engaged 
in farming. He was a Revolutionary soldier, 
and died at Ticonderoga. Mr. and Mrs. 
Emory Carr had eight children' — James E., 
Joseph F., Edward J., Rebecca, Abby, Ruth, 
John W., and Edwin. The last five are de- 
ceased. 

Edward J. Carr acquired his education in 
the common schools of his native town. At 
the breaking out of the Rebellion he enlisted 
in Company I, Thirteenth New Hampshire 
Regiment, and was mustered in at Ipswich. 
Enlisting for three years, he was on detached' 
duty for two years and a half in Battery A, 
First Pennsylvania Artillery, and was in the 
first battle of Fredericksburg, at the siege of 
Suffolk, in the engagement at Chapin's 
farm, and at Fair Oaks. At Fair Oaks, 
on an average, two horses were killed in 
each team of six drawing the caissons and 
guns; but Mr. Carr was not wounded. He 
came home when the army was disbanded. 
Engaging in the pursuit of agriculture, he 
bought his first farm in 1870 at Templeton, 
Mass., and occupied it about three years. He 
then bought a farm in Carlisle, and resided 
thereon twenty years. His present farm, 
covering about forty-five acres, adjoining that, 
he purchased some four years ago. His wife 
owns seventy-five acres in out-lots in the 
town of Carlisle. 

Mr. Carr was married January 14, 1868, to 
Luranah M. Heald, who was born in Carlisle, 
November 3, 1846. She is a daughter of Ai 
and Luranah Forbush (Green) Heald. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carr have four children — Charles 
A., Rena M., Marion L., and Alva. They 
have lost one, Nellie. Mr. Carr has served as 
Assessor and Superintendent of Roads, and 
was for some time on the School Board. He 
is at present a member of the Board of Select- 



men. He is a comrade of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, belonging to Isaac Davis Post, 
No. 138, of Acton, Mass. 



tOYAL GILKEY, for many years a 
prominent business man of Water- 
town, Mass., now living retired, 
was born in Islesboro, Me., May 
24, 1 82 1, son of Philip and Jane (Pendleton) 
Gilkey. His grandfather, John Gilkey, was 
of Scotch descent. He lived for a time on 
Cape Cod, but most of his mature life was 
spent at Islesboro, where he followed his trade 
of ship-builder and blacksmith, doing the iron 
work on vessels. He built at Gilkey's Har- 
bor, about one hundred and fifty years ago, 
the old homestead dwelling, in which both 
Mr. Royal Gilkey and his father were born. 
The harbor was named for Grandfather Gilkey, 
who settled there in 1775, and died in 1818, 
at the age of seventy-four years. He was a 
man of great force of character, a stanch 
patriot in Revolutionary times. He was an 
influential and honored citizen, being Select- 
man in 1789. His wife was Sylvina Thomas, 
a native of Marshfield, Mass. She died 
April 23, 1832. 

Philip Gilkey, above named, was born at 
Islesboro in 1788, and died January 5, 1872, 
at the age of eighty-four years. He early 
began to follow the sea, and when quite a 
young man became captain of a sailing-vessel. 
He made voyages to foreign ports and to the 
West Indies, and at one time he ran a packet 
from Castine, Me., to Boston. He was part 
owner of many sailing craft. The last years 
of his life were spent in what is now called 
Searsport, then a part of Belfast, where he 
owned a farm. His first wife, Jane Pendle- 
ton, bore eight children, Royal being the 
youngest-born. She died in 1821, in her 
thirty-third year. His second wife, Deborah 
Gushing, of Hingham, Mass., had seven chil- 
dren, of whom three are now living. She 
died October 27, 1865, at seventy-eight years 
of age. Judith P., one of the eight children of 
the first marriage now living except the subject 
of this sketch, is the widow of William G. 
Hardy, of Boston, Mass., and mother of two 
children — Wallace L. and Addie. The living 




ROYAL GILKEY 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



children of the second marriage are: Captain 
Welcome and Anna C, who are twins. Cap- 
tain Welcome Gilkey married Evelina Ross, 
now deceased, of Searsport, and they had three 
daughters — Deborah, Emma, and Malina A. 
Anna C. is the widow of Hugh Ross, of Ban- 
gor, Me., and mother of five children — Wal- 
ter, Ralph, Anna, Grace, and Mary. Lincoln 
Gilkey married Elsie Sawyer, of Searsport, 
and had a family of seven children — Philip, 
Nathan, Pyam, Mary, Frederick, Eben, and 
one who died in infancy. In politics Philip 
Gilkey was a Whig and later a Republican. 
He was a very enterprising man and a success- 
ful one. 

Mr. Royal Gilkey attended school in his 
boyhood in what is now known as Searsport, 
and at the age of fourteen went to Hampden 
Academy. From the time he was twelve 
years old he went to sea with his father as 
cabin boy during the summer, attending 
school in winter. After the age of seventeen 
he began a seafaring life in earnest, going to 
the West Indies, and during the hot season 
coasting along the shores of New England. 
When only nineteen he was placed in com- 
mand of a vessel, named for him the "Royal 
Welcome," and made a trip from Bangor, Me., 
to Saco with a load of sleepers for the East- 
ern Railroad. He followed the sea, making 
his home at Searsport, up to 1844, and in that 
year came to Watertown, and formed a part- 
nership in the lumber business with Sylvester 
Priest, under the firm name of Priest & Gil- 
key, his first visit to the town having been 
made on June 19, 1842. The partnership 
with Mr. Priest continued until 1851; and 
afterward Mr. Gilkey was alone until 1855, 
when he took another partner, and the firm 
became Royal Gilkey & Co., continuing under 
that name until 1865. Thenceforward until 
1878 Mr. Gilkey was alone. In that year 
was founded the firm of Gilkey & Stone, which 
became well known, and carried on a large 
and prosperous business till 1893, when Mr. 
Gilkey retired. 

On December 21, 1841, Mr. Gilkey was 
married to Hannah N. , daughter of Benjamin 
Young, of Belfast, Me. Mrs. Gilkey was the 
youngest child in a family of eight children, 
of whom she and her sister Margaret are the 



only ones now living. Mr. and Mrs. Gilkey 
have had four children — Royal F., Ella Jane, 
Clara, and James H. Royal F. died at the 
age of thirty-three years. His wife was Lucy 
M. Fox, of Vermont, and their two children 
were: Royal W. and Frank S. Ella Jane 
died at twelve years of age. Clara is the 
widow of Albert Matthews, of South Yar- 
mouth, Me. Her husband died at sea while 
they were on a voyage to Java. James H. 
Gilkey married Mary L. Johnson, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., and has four children — 
Charles W., Royal, James G., and Gladys F. 
Mr. Gilkey and his family are members of 
the Baptist church, as were also his parents. 
Mr. Gilkey has been a Deacon in the church 
for twenty-five years, and is now senior 
Deacon. In politics he is a Republican, and 
has taken an active part in all town affairs. 
He was a member of the Board of Selectmen 
in 1848, 1853, and 1854, and is now the old- 
est living ex-Selectman of the town. He has 
also served as Assessor, has been a direc- 
tor in the Union Market National Bank for 
several years, and has held many other offices 
of trust. He is a member of the Baptist So- 
cial Union of Boston, and has been on the 
Bethel Board as auditor and clerk of the 
church several years. He is noted for his 
strictly temperate habits and for his unques- 
tioned integrity, as have been all the men of 
his family. As a citizen he is public-spirited 
and enterprising, and enjoys the entire con- 
fidence of his fellow-townsmen. 



/pTTo 



EORGE B. WISWALL, an esteemed 
\ 1^ I farmer of Newton, was born here, in 
Ward Five, on the old homestead off 
Dedham Street, September 13, i860. The 
emigrant ancestor of the family came from 
England, but of his immediate descendants 
no record is given. Mr. Wiswall's father, 
Artemas Wiswall, who now lives retired at 
RosHndale, was born on the old farm in New- 
ton in 1826. He was educated for the teach- 
ing profession, but subsequently became a 
farmer; and the greater part of his active 
career was spent in tilling the soil. His 
wife, Lucy Frances, is a daughter of George 
Boutwell, of Andover, Mass. They had six 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



children; namely, William, Fannie H., 
George B., Samuel C, Granville A., and M. 
Louise. William died in infancy. Fannie 
H., who was educated at the Newton schools 
and at the Boston Normal School, lives with 
her father, Samuel C., born in 1863, who 
was educated in Newton and Boston, is now 
station agent at Somerville Highlands on the 
Boston & Maine Railroad. He married Miss 
Annie Dorr, who is now deceased. Granville 
A., born in 1866, who was also educated in 
Newton and Boston, and is now engaged in 
the grocery and provision business at West 
Roxbury, married Hattie Riley. M. Louise, 
born in 1868, and likewise educated in New- 
ton and Boston, lives at home. 

George B. Wiswall attended the common 
schools of Newton and a Boston grammar 
school. Returning to the farm, he has since 
devoted his attention to mixed farming, mak- 
ing a specialty of the milk business. He 
keeps ten cows and sells the milk at West 
Roxbury. He was married September 24, 
1885, to Saphronia, daughter of Susan Hardy, 
of Andover, Mass. Their three children are: 
Ralph A., born June 18, 1886; Lucy F., 
born November 4, 1887; and Charles H., born 
July 13, 1890. All are attending school. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wiswall are members of the 
Smith Evangelical Congregational Church, 
West Roxbury, and take quite an interest in 
church work. He is a member of the 
A. O. U. W. of West Roxbury. 



m 



kOSES CAMPBELL MITCHELL, 
principal and proprietor of the 
well-known Mitchell's Boys' 
School, Billerica, Mass., was 
born in Temple, Me., on January 27, 1840, 
the son of a Maine farmer. During his boy- 
hood, which was passed on the home farm, he 
attended the public schools. Later he en- 
tered Colby University at Waterville, Me., 
graduating from this institution in the class 
of 1862. He had begun to teach at the age of 
sixteen, and he paid his way through college 
from his own earnings. Among his class- 
mates were Richard Shannon, of New York, 
a builder and promoter of the Brazilian Rail- 
road System, and Professor E. W. Hall, now 



of Colby University. A large proportion of 
the men of this class enlisted as soldiers in 
the late war, and many of themi gave their 
lives in defence of the Union. 

Mr. Mitchell taught in the high school at 
Farmington, Me., in the Pratt Free School at 
Middleboro, then as principal of Wilton Acad- 
emy, and later on as principal of Duke's 
County Academy on Martha's Vineyard. He 
started his home school on the island in 1870, 
in the town of West Tisbury. At first he had 
only one pupil, and at the end of ten years 
had a dozen. In January, 1880, he came to 
Billerica, bringing eight pupils, and hiring 
for their use an ordinary house. He sought 
for larger rooms, and finally, in the same 
year, bought the old Billerica Hotel stand. 
He soon had the whole of the building in use, 
and was carrying on a most flourishing school, 
when, on January 11, 1888, the hotel was 
burned, with a total loss to Mr. Mitchell. 
He was then offered the Unitarian vestry, 
with its parlors and kitchen as temporary 
quarters; and he occupied these rooms during 
the remainder of the year. 

In 1888, the same year, the present build- 
ing was erected at a cost of twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. It was opened "with thirty 
pupils, and in a short time the number in- 
creased to forty, the limit. This building 
was constructed expressly for the use of the 
school, and has been arranged and furnished 
with special reference to the needs of a home 
school for boys. It is believed to be the only 
one in New England originally so designed, 
others being old buildings remodelled. The 
first floor contains the office, sitting-rooms, 
parlors, dining-rooms, and the second floor 
the boys' sleeping-rooms, each of which is 
arranged to accommodate two boys in single 
beds. Careful attention has been given to 
ventilation, plumbing, and all sanitary ar- 
rangements, and every effort is made to secure 
not only the health of the pupils, but, as far 
as possible, the freedom and comforts of the 
pleasantest home life. There is never any 
lack of amusements outside of study hours, as 
the extensive grounds give ample opportunity 
for sports of all kinds, including base ball, 
tennis, cricket, foot ball, fishing, rowing, and 
swimming; and the well-equipped hall and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gymnasium furnish the best facilities for in- 
door games. There is also a cannon squad, 
and provision is made for superior training in 
military tactics. 

Save in particular cases, only boys from six 
to fifteen inclusive will be admitted, but each 
one admitted may remain as long as agreeable 
to all parties. The course of study is such as, 
under competent teachers, will afford system- 
atic and thorough instruction from the be- 
ginning to the end of a complete education for 
boys. It embraces two parallel courses, the 
classical and the English (or commercial), 
each conducted by efficient instructors, and 
includes the various branches of mathematics, 
science, history, and language. Those wish- 
ing to fit for college are carefully prepared in 
the course prescribed by the particular insti- 
tution they desire to enter, and receive that 
special and individual instruction which can 
only be obtained by private tutorship. Many 
students are prepared here for the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. Modern lan- 
guages are in charge of native teachers, or of 
those equally well qualified to instruct and 
it is expected that pupils completing the pre- 
scribed course of study in either French, Ger- 
man, or Spanish, will be able to read, write, 
and speak the language intelligently. 
Especial attention is given to oral and written 
work in English. Boys are required to pre- 
pare a composition or declamation each week, 
and there is a specified period each week 
allotted to letter writing, under the guidance 
of an instructor. Besides this there is pub- 
lished the 31. B. S. Echo, a school paper, 
which affords much beneficial experience as 
well as amusement, and at the same time 
gives the friends of the school all information 
of special interest to them. 

While every effort is made to give a sub- 
stantial basis of general information and 
liberal culture, the boys are also taught those 
graces and accomplishments of life which fit 
them to enter the best society with credit to 
themselves and to their families. Instruc- 
tion is given in dancing, in music, and in 
elocution; and the daily intercourse between 
teachers and pupils is such as to stimulate all 
refined and polite courtesy. Great care is 
taken to secure first-class teachers of music; 



and boys desiring to receive instruction on 
piano, violin, banjo, or guitar, may be assured 
that the instruction given here will be of no 
ordinary class. Mr. Mitchell believes that 
boys cannot become physically well developed 
and vigorous men, and that they cannot do 
their best work as students, without the most 
nutritious food. Accordingly that served 
here is always of the best quality and well 
prepared. The M. B. S. farm furnishes fresh 
milk, butter, and vegetables, and is a most 
valuable part of the institution. The disci- 
pline of the school is under the immediate 
supervision of Mr. Mitchell, who holds him- 
self responsible for the proper conduct of both 
teachers and pupils. It is intended to be 
what any judicious parent would desire, and 
to develop the manliness of the boys by mak- 
ing them self-controlling and self-respecting. 
Mr. Mitchell's school has now become so 
widely known that pupils have been sent to it 
from all sections of the country and from 
nearly every State in the Union. It is un- 
sectarian, and different religious denomina- 
tions are represented in the roll of its pupils 
and patrons. Its popularity is attested by 
this fact, and by the fact that he is often 
urged to receive pupils when his number is 
already full. Mr. Mitchell's constant and 
most judicious helper in building up the 
school and in maintaining its high standing 
has been his wife, formerly Miss Mary C. 
Hansom, to whom he was married on the 26th 
of July, 1876. Mr., and Mrs. Mitchell have 
one son, Alexander H. Mitchell, now a youth 
of seventeen. 



§OHN BYAM, one of the prominent cit- 
izens of South Chelmsford, a represent- 
ative of one of the oldest families in 
the town, was born in Boston, Febru- 
ary 5, 1832, son of Josiah and Sophronia 
(Flagg) Byam, and came when only four years 
old to the farm which has since been his 
home. The records of the family have been 
carefully kept; and Mr. Byam can trace his 
ancestry back to George Byam, who was in 
Wenham in 1640, and who came to Chelms- 
ford in 1653, settling where Lawyer George 
A. Byam now lives. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



George Byam's son Abraham married for 
his first wife Experience Alford, of Scituate, 
and for his second wife Mary Ony. He 
died in 1732. He had three sons, one of 
whom, named Jacob, removed to Randolph, 
Vt., whence his descendants scattered. The 
Byams now in Chelmsford are descended from 
the other sons, Abraham, second, and Isaac. 
Abraham Byam, second, lived on the old 
homestead. His children were as follows: 
Abraham, born in 1713; Thomas, who died in 
infancy; Henry, born in 1720; Lieutenant 
Benjamin; Tabitha; Joanna; Experience; 
and Abigail. 

Lieutenant Benjamin Byam had two wives 
— Hanna Roby and Hannah Keys. His 
children were: Abel; Benjamin, born in 
1769, who married Rebecca Butterfield; 
Sarah; Betsey; and Rebecca. Henry Byam, 
another son of the second Abraham, married 
Lucy Fletcher. His children were: Henry, 
Jr., who died at six; James, who died at four; 
Amos, who was born in 1754, and died in 
1792; Willard, who died at twenty; Oliver, 
who died in infancy; Mary; and Rebecca. 

Amos, the only son of Henry and Lucy that 
grew to maturity, was never robust, and was 
always unable to carry out his plans. He 
married Sarah Pierce, who lived to be ninety- 
eight years of age, and had six children, 
namely: Amos, second, who was born in 1784, 
and died in 1854; Henry, who was born in 
1788, and died in 1862; Asaph, born in 1791, 
who married Mary Spaulding, and died in 
1838; Lucy M., who married Jonas Dunn, and 
removed to Vermont; Mollie, who married 
Captain John Shedd ; and Rebecca, who mar- 
ried Henry Adams, and removed to Vermont. 
Amos, second, born in 1854, married Lucy 
Adams, and their children were: Amos, third; 
Rufus (1816-55), who had no family; and 
Lucy Marinda. Amos, third, who \vas born 
in 1808 and lived to 1892, had one son, 
George Adams Byam, above named, born Oc- 
tober 29, 1843, and two daughters, Lucy 
Amanda and Mary Frances. 

Henry Byam, son of Amos and Sarah 
(Pierce) Byam, married Relief Spaulding, and 
had the following children: Henry Augustus, 
who lives near Boston; Charles Wellington, 
of South Chelmsford ; Austin Grosvenor, who 



died young; Anna Relief, who married Henry 
Adams ; Sarah Parkhurst, who married Joseph 
Bradford Emerson; and Mary Saville, who 
married George Adams Byam, the attorney. 

Isaac, the third son of Abraham and Mary 
(Ony) Byam, settled on the farm now owned 
by Mr. John Byam, which is a short dis- 
tance from the old homestead settled by 
George Byam. Isaac Byam had two children: 
Samuel, who died an infant; and John, born 
1730, who was a drummer in the Revolution. 
John Byam, first, married Sarah Blanchard, 
and had a family of thirteen children, named 
as follows: John (second), Zebediah, James, 
Solomon, William, Willard, Simeon, Susan- 
nah, Mary, Hannah, Sally, Deliverance, and 
Anna. 

William, the fifth child, married Rebecca 
Foster. Their only son, Ezekiel Byam, mar- 
ried Charlotte Bateman, and lived in South 
Chelmsford, where he started the manufact- 
ure of the famous Byam matches. The busi- 
ness grew, and he removed to Charlestown, 
Mass., now a district of Boston, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, George Ezekiel, who died 
in 1896. Another son is a soap manufacturer 
in Charlestown, and a son Charles is a shoe 
dealer there. Simeon, the seventh child of 
John and Sarah (Blanchard) Byam, married 
Thankful Reed, and inherited the farm. He 
had no children, and when he grew old his 
nephew Josiah came to the farm, and carried 
it on and inherited it. 

Solomon, born in 1770, the fourth child of 
John and Sarah (Blanchard) Byam, married 
Abi Adams, and had a family of thirteen chil- 
dren, as follows: Patty, who married Isaiah 
Spaulding; Triphena, who married Benjamin 
Hey wood, of New York; Mary, who married 
Parker Chamberlain, and lived in Lowell; 
Betsey, who married Benjamin Dudley, of 
South Chelmsford; Josiah, born May 8, 1795, 
who died January 28, 1865; Salathiel, who 
married Susan Robbins, and died at nearly 
eighty years of age; Otis (1799-1857), who 
married Lavina Bonner, and whose son, 
George Otis Byam, father of ten children, 
lives at Chelmsford Centre; Marcus Daniel, 
1806-78 (see sketch of Daniel Byam); Sol- 
omon Edwin, 1810-73 (see sketch of Frank 
C. Byam) ; Clarrissa, who married for her 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



second husband Dr. Warner, and died April 
17, 1891; Stillman, who married first Mary 
Ann Carpenter and for his second wife 
Delpha Phelps, and had five children; Laura, 
who married Samuel White, and was killed 
with her husband in Minnesota at the time of 
the great outbreak of the Sioux Indians in 
1862; and Ephraim, who married Sarah At- 
wood, and had one son, George Ephraim. 

Josiah Byam, fifth child of Solomon, mar- 
ried first Sophronia Flagg, of Littleton. She 
died in 1841; and he married for his second 
wife Sarah Hardy, who survived him till De- 
cember 8, 1880. In 1836 Josiah came to the 
farm of his uncle Simeon, as above noted; 
and here he spent the rest of his life, dying, 
as above noted, in 1865. His children, all of 
whom were born of the first marriage, were: 
Sophronia Ann ; Lucinda C. ; Arabella; John, 
the subject of this sketch; Josiah L. ; Lavina; 
Roxana; Susan; and Josephine. Josiah L. 
and Lavina died in infancy. Sophronia Ann 
married William Cook, who was killed at the 
battle of Lookout Mountain. She died April 
24, 1882. Lucinda C. m.arried William B. S. 
Drew, and died at Longmont, Col., November 
5, 1894. Arabella P. married Elbridge Yea- 
ton,- and died in Littleton, Mass., on August 
16, 1878. Roxana married A. P. Hager, and 
lives in Littleton. Susan died at the age of" 
eighteen. Josephine married George P. Hol- 
ten, and lives at Fitchburg, Mass. 

Mr. John Byam has spent his life on the 
old farm which is such a storehouse of relics 
and memories of the Byam family. There are 
about thirty acres of land, and Mr. Byam en- 
gages in general farming. On February 15, 
1868, he married Sarah C. Mountfort, of Po- 
land, Me. She died May 30, 1873; and Mr. 
Byam married on April 12, 1874, Miss Mari- 
etta Rouillard, of Acton, Mass., daughter of 
Frederic and Sarah Potter Rouillard. Fred- 
eric is a son of Louis Rouillard, who ran away 
from France at the age of twelve years, and 
came to America on the United States ship 
"Constitution."- He worked for some time 
as a candy-maker in Boston. After that he 
went to Pepperell and thence to Littleton as 
an innkeeper, and he later removed to 
Acton. His wife was Hannah Parker, of 
Pepperell. Louis Rouillard died at the age 



of eighty ; and Frederic, who was born on July 
4, 1812, died in h^s seventy-eighth year. 

Mr. John Byam has one daughter, Miss 
Stella May Byam, born September 20, 1875, 
a lady who has spent most of her life with 
her parents, as Mrs. Byam has always been in 
delicate health. Miss Byam has taken con- 
siderable pains to make research touching the 
family history, and nearly all the facts here 
given were furnished by her. Mr. Byam is 
a Republican in political affiliations, although 
he has not cared to enter active public life. 
In religious faith the family are Baptists. 



DGAR N. NASH, a retired sea captain 
residing at Newton Highlands, was 
born in Steuben, Me., in 1837, son 
of Captain Ira Nash. The grandfather, Will- 
iam N. Nash, a native of Maine and a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, married Belinda Coffin, a 
native of Nantucket and a descendant of Puri- 
tan ancestry. Captain Ira Nash, also a native 
of Steuben, born in 181 1, died in 1876, after 
having followed the sea as a ship-master for 
the greater part of his life. He married a 
daughter of Major-general Samuel Moore, who 
was at one time a member of the Executive 
Council of the State of Maine. 

Edgar N. Nash was educated in the schools 
of his native town and at the East Conference 
Seminary, Bucksport. After teaching school 
for a number of terms, he shipped before the 
mast on board of the bark "Ospray," com- 
manded by his father, making a voyage to 
Buenos Ayres and back to Philadelphia. He 
afterward made trips to the Mediterranean on 
the same vessel, rising to the position of 
mate. Later he sailed in that capacity on the 
brig "Mariposa," engaged in the West India 
trade, and on an English bark called the "Pal- 
mira," between ports in the United States 
and Europe, for nine months. At the end of 
the latter period he engaged in mercantile 
business on the island of Mount Desert. 
Taking command of the brig "Orbit " in 1871, 
he continued to make profitable trips to the 
West Indies, Europe, and Africa, for the suc- 
ceeding fourteen years. The only serious 
accident he ever met with happened in 1880, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



when his vessel became so disabled from the 
effects of a tremendous hurricane five hundred 
miles south-east of the Bermudas that, on 
reaching St. Thomas with much difficulty, 
the vessel had to undergo extensive repairs. 
In 1885 he retired permanently from the sea. 
Two years later he settled at Newton High- 
lands, of which place he was appointed the 
Postmaster in the following year by President 
Cleveland. He was reappointed Postmaster 
by President Harrison, and again by President 
Cleveland during the latter's second adminis- 
tration. 

In 1866 Captain Nash was united in mar- 
riage with Martha G. Jones, a daughter of 
Samuel S. Jones, of Maine, and said to be a 
descendant of John Alden. Mrs. Nash is the 
mother of two sons: Walter H., born at 
Mount Desert, Me., in 1872; and Arthur E. 
Nash, born in Waltham, Mass., in 1887. 
Walter H. Nash was educated in Waltham, 
and is now with the banking firm of Mills & 
Blanchard, Boston. Arthur E. Nash is at- 
tending school. Captain Nash is independent 
in politics. Now a Master Mason, he has 
served as Junior Warden of the lodge at 
Mount Desert, Me., in which he took his de- 
grees. He is a member of the Congregational 
church. 



ARREN PARKER FOX, of Wo- 
burn, founder of the firm of W. P. 
Fox & Son, tanners, was born in 
this town on May 13, 1829, son of Warren 
and Eliza (Parker) Fox. He is a descend- 
ant in the seventh generation of the Rev. 
Jabez Fox, who was born in Concord, Mass., 
in 1647. 

Jabez was a soil of Thomas Fox, the emi- 
grant from England. He removed to Cam- 
bridge, and was graduated at Harvard College 
in 1665. He was ordained and settled as a 
minister of the gospel in Woburn in 1679, 
having previously served a year as an assistant 
to the pastor, the Rev. Thomas Carter, who 
died in 1684. The Rev. Jabez Fox died Feb- 
ruary 28, 1703, and was buried at Woburn. 
His successor in the Woburn pulpit and in 
this line of ancestry was his son, the Rev. 
John Fox, who was born to him and his wife, 



Judith, daughter of the Rev. John Reyner, of 
Plymouth, May 10, 1678, at Cambridge. He 
was graduated at Harvard in i6gS, was in- 
vited in April, 1703, to preach at Woburn for 
three months, and on November 17, 1703, was 
ordained and installed as "pastor of the 
church [First Congregational] and minister of 
the town of Woburn." The Rev. John Fox 
continued his labors here for over half a cen- 
tury, or until his death, December 12, 1756. 
His wife was Mary Twing, daughter of the 
Hon. Edward Twing. 

Colonel Jonathan Fox, son of the Rev. 
John, was born in Woburn, March 26, 17 16. 
He served as Captain of what was known as 
the East Company in Woburn from 1761 to 
1774, marched with it to Concord on April 

19. 1775) and served as Colonel in the Revo- 
lutionary War from 1775 to 1781. He died 
April 17, 1790, aged seventy-four years. In 
1737 he married Ruth, daughter of Samuel 
and Margery Carter. Their son, Thomas Fox, 
who was born in Woburn, December 16, 1739, 
married Elizabeth Reed, March 31, 1763. 
He served as an enlisted soldier in the expe- 
dition against Canada in 1760, was in Captain 
Edward Monroe's company from May 16 to 
May 20, 1775,- and also served in a company 
from Woburn commanded by Captain Will- 
iam Barrows, which did duty at Cambridge by 
order of the Committee of Public Safety. 
Thomas Fox died on May 7, 18 15. 

His son, William Fox, grandfather of War- 
ren P., was a native of Lexington, and resided 
in Woburn. He was a butcher, a tallow- 
chandler, and a farmer, and one of the most 
prominent business men in his day. He mar- 
ried Arethusa Monroe, of Lexington, June 

20, 1793, and was the father of ten children. 
He died February 10, 1852. 

Warren Fox, son of William and Arethusa, 
was born in Woburn, January 16, 1804. 
When a young man he engaged in the tanning 
and currying business, following it success- 
fully until his retirement, which took place in 
1875. He died June 22, 1887, He was an 
active member of the Congregational church. 
His wife, formerly Eliza Parker, whom he 
married in 1827, was a daughter of Joseph and 
Betsey (Richardson) Parker. She became the 
mother of four children, of whom two are liv- 




WARREN P. FOX, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing, namely: Warren P., familiarly known as 
Parker Fox, the subject of this sketch; and 
Celenda, wife of Jacob Whitcher, of Woburn. 
Warren Parker Fox was educated in the 
public schools of Woburn. When twelve 
years old he began to make himself useful in 
his father's tannery; and, after learning the 
trade, of tanning and currying, he was em- 
ployed in the business until his father's retire- 
ment. In 1875 he took charge of the busi- 
ness, which he carried on in his own name 
until 1887, when by the admission of his son, 

E. P. Fox, the firm became W. P. Fox & Son, 
he himself withdrawing as an active partner, 
but still retaining an interest. The tannery 
is located at Woburn Highlands, and the 
currying shop is on Kilby Street. The con- 
cern makes a specialty of oil grain, satin, and 
split leather, turning out about three hundred 
sides and two tons of split leather per day, 
fifty per cent, of which is exported to Eng- 
land. The entire product is handled by 
W. H. Allen & Son, 72 High Street, Boston. 
The hides are obtained mostly in the West, 
the bark comes from Canada, and an average 
of eighty men are employed. 

In 1853 Mr. Fox was united in marriage 
with Maria M. Newhall, daughter of Alfred 
and Margery (Thompson) Newhall, of Wo- 
burn. Mrs. Fox is the mother of three chil- 
dren, namely: Clara M., born September 19, 
1855; Everett P., born September 10, i860; 
and John William, born February 14, 1863. 
Clara M. taught in the Woburn public schools 
for some years, and is now book-keeper for the 
firm of W. P. Fox & Son. Everett P. Fox 
learned the tanner's and currier's trade, and 
is now at the head of the firm. He has served 
in both branches of the city government, and 
is prominently identified with public affairs. 
In 1882 he married Elona S., daughter of 
Ward L. and Caroline N. Dennis, of this 
city. She died in 1892, leaving one daugh- 
ter, Elona S., born in 1884. In 1895 Everett 
P. Fox was again married to Kathrine L. , 
daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Smith, of 
Woburn. John William Fox, who is now 
with the firm of W. P. Fox & Son, was mar- 
ried to Carrie B. Cook, daughter of William 

F. and Arvilla (Fish) Cook, on November 19, 
1885, and has one daughter, Mildred A., born 



in 1887. John William Fox has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Aldermen of Woburn. 

In politics Mr. Warren Parker P"ox is a Re- 
publican. He has taken an active interest in 
public affairs, though he has never aspired to 
office. The family are all members of the 
Congregational church. Everett P. Fox has 
been a Deacon for some years and a member of 
the Parish Committee. He was formerly 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. John 
William Fox is also interested in the affairs of 
the First Congregational Church, and is now 
serving as treasurer. 



HE BANCROFT FAMILY is one of 
the oldest in Tyngsboro, having been 
identified with the locality for over one 
hundred and sixty years. Its ancestry is 
traced to Lieutenant Thomas Bancroft, who 
came to Massachusetts from England when 
about ten or twelve years old. He probably 
lived for some time with his parents in Lynn. 
The records of Dedham show that Thomas 
Bancroft was married in 1647 to Alice Bacon, 
that she died in 1648, and that he was married 
a few months later to Elizabeth Metcalf. He 
owned land in Reading and also in Lynnfield, 
and is said to have resided at different periods 
in each of those towns. Ebenezer, his third 
son by his wife Elizabeth, married Abigail 
Eaton, and settled in Lynnfield. 

Lieutenant Timothy Bancroft, son of Eben- 
ezer, was born in 1709, and in 1734 he located 
at a point on the Merrimac River now the 
town of Tyngsboro. His military commis- 
sion, which bears the date of June 27, 1754, 
was signed by Governor William Shirley; 
and he served under Colonel Eleazer Tyng. 
He married Elizabeth Farwell, daughter of 
Henry Farwell, one of the pioneers in this 
town, and reared ten children. Lieutenant 
Timothy Bancroft died in 1772. 

Colonel Ebenezer, one of his sons, was born 
in Tyngsboro, April i, 1738. In 1754, when 
but sixteen years old, he joined a company of 
soldiers en route for Canada. After taking 
part in the French and Indian War, during 
which he suffered many hardships, he with 
some others succeeded in picking their way 
through the wilderness to their homes. In 



igS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1757 he was commissioned an Ensign in Cap- 
tain John Alford Tyng's company, which 
served under Rogers and Stark; and it is prob- 
able that he was present at the siege and capt- 
ure of Quebec. On May 27, 1775, he 
marched to Cariibridge to join the patriot 
forces there assembled. He was commis- 
sioned Captain in Colonel Ebenezer Bridge's 
regiment at Watertown, and at the battle of 
Bunker Hill he commanded a company of 
fifty-eight, officers and men, forty-two of whom 
were residents of Dunstable. He kept fir- 
ing as long as his ammunition lasted, and is 
said to have been the last man to leave the 
works, making his escape by clubbing a pas- 
sage out with a musket, losing in the mel6e 
the forefinger of his right hand. He was 
commissioned Second Major of the Seventh 
Middlesex County Regiment, Colonel Simeon 
Spaulding, February 8, 1776; was made First 
Major, June 2, 1778; was on April 21, 1780, 
advanced to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel of 
the Seventh Regiment, under Brigadier-gen- 
eral Eleazar Brooks; was on June ■ 28 as- 
signed to Colonel Cyprian Howe's regiment, 
which was ordered to re-enforce the Continen- 
tal army in Rhode Island; and he was honor- 
ably discharged October 30 of the same year. 
He must have rejoined the army, however, as 
his name appears upon the pay-rolls as late as 
February 19, 1783; and his military record 
probably ended with the close of the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

On March 24, 1760, Colonel Ebenezer Ban- 
croft bought the Jonathan Farwell estate, ad- 
joining his father's farm ; and on May 5, 1763, 
he married Susanna, daughter of Deacon Jo- 
seph Fletcher, of Dunstable, and a grand- 
daughter of Captain Joseph and Sarah 
(Adams) Fletcher, of Chelmsford, Mass. 
Being cognizant of the fact that the Declara- 
tion of Independence was to be signed on July 
4, 1776, he on that day planted an American 
elm in his yard, and discharged his musket 
thirteen times as a salute. This ceremony he 
continued as long as he lived, adding a round 
to the number for each new State admitted to 
the Union. Colonel Ebenezer Bancroft died 
upon his farm in Tyngsboro, September 27, 
1827, in his ninetieth year. His son Eben- 
ezer was for many years a Justice of the Peace 



in Tyngsboro; and his grandson, the fourth 
Ebenezer Bancroft, died at the homestead, 
July 12, 1891, aged eighty-three years. His 
widow is still residing there. Her son, Eben- 
ezer, fifth, great-grandson of the Colonel, died 
from the effects of a railroad accident, Febru- 
ary 12, 1 89 1, aged forty-four years. On July 
5, 1 87 1, he married Carrie Nichols, of 
Nashua, N.H. Their union was blessed with 
three children; namely, Minnie Ardell, Lila 
May, and Ebenezer Luther. 

Deacon Jonathan Bancroft, son of Lieuten- 
ant Timothy and a brother of Colonel Eben- 
ezer Bancroft, was born August 11, 1750. 
He was a member of Captain Leonard Butter- 
field's company of Dunstable (minute-men), 
and was a Sergeant in Captain Ford's com- 
pany in September, 1777, having previously, 
it is thought, taken part in the battle of Ben- 
nington, was made Second Lieutenant in 
178 1, and in 1786 was commissioned First 
Lieutenant of the Seventh Middlesex County 
Regiment. He was a prominent member of 
the Unitarian church and for many years a 
Deacon. He died July 1 1, 1815. 

Major Jonathan Bancroft, son of Deacon 
Jonathan, was born February 9, 1774. He 
settled upon a farm in New Hampshire just 
over the State line. His commission as 
Major in the New Hampshire militia was 
signed by Governor William Plummer, June 
17, 18 1 2. He married Sarah Taylor, of Dra- 
cut, Mass., on July 4, 1798, and had a family 
of two sons — Jonathan and Ephraim — and 
eight daughters. Major Jonathan Bancroft 
died September 24, 1838. He was a Deacon 
of the Unitarian church. 

Jonathan Bancroft, third, his elder son, was 
born in Nashua, N.H., June 21, 181 1. He 
was reared at the old homestead of his ances- 
tor, Timothy Bancroft, which he occupied 
until his death, August 27, 1888; and the 
present residence was erected by him in 1838. 
He was a citizen of prominence in his day, 
and served as Tax Collector for thirteen years. 
His first wife, Eliza Kendall, whom he mar- 
ried December 2, 1838, was born in Tyngs- 
boro, December 22, 1817, daughter of Jere- 
miah Kendall. She died December 10, 1871. 
His second wife, who was before marriage 
Ellen Kezar, died in 1883. He was the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



father of five children by his first union, 
namely: Ellen E. , who married William 
Blanchard, and resides in Tyngsboro; Jennie 
M., who lives in Boston, and is the widow of 
Hale Wesson; Elmira, who died in 1893, un- 
married ; Jonathan F. ; and S. Emma, who 
married Charles Burrows, and resides in 
Rutherford, N.J. 

Jonathan Franklin Bancroft, the present oc- 
cupant of the homestead in Tyngsboro, was 
born January 24, 1847. He attended the 
State Agricultural College at Amherst, Mass., 
one year, and, with the exception of three 
years spent as a workman in a box factory, has 
since given his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. He is a Republican in politics, and 
has served upon the School Board for five 
years. 

On September 25, 1872, he married Helen 
A. Kidder, daughter of Zimri and Mary Swan 
Kidder, of Tyngsboro. Her grandmother was 
Martha, daughter of Deacon Jonathan Ban- 
croft. Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan F. Bancroft 
have a family of five children; namely, Hor- 
ace Timothy, Edna H., Ernest Goessmann, 
Chester F. Kidder, and Jennie Josephine 
Bancroft. 



/®Xo 



EORGE WHEATON NICKERSON, 
\ 1^ I M.D., one of the leading physicians 

— and surgeons of Stoneham, was born 
in West Tisbury, Mass., February 7, 1852, 
son of Joseph and Eliza P. (Chase) Nickerson. 
He is a descendant of William Nickerson, of 
Norwich, England, who two hundred and 
fifty years ago sailed with his family from 
Ipswich on board the ship "John and Doro- 
thy," to make for himself a home in the New 
World. He arrived in Boston on the twen- 
tieth day of June, 1637, and after a short resi- 
dence in Watertown went to Yarmouth, where 
he subsequently purchased large tracts of land 
from the Indians. He was instrumental in 
founding the town of Chatham, and his de- 
scendants are now scattered throughout New 
England and other States. 

George Wheaton Nickerson received his 
elementary education in the public schools. 
He fitted for college at the Dukes County 
Academy, and pursued a classical course in 



the Wesleyan University at Middletown, 
Conn. He studied medicine at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, 
where he took a four years' course, and from 
1878 to 1884 he practised his profession in 
the metropolis. In the latter year he located 
in Stoneham, where he has secured a large 
practice both as a physician and surgeon, and 
is a practitioner of recognized skill and abil- 
ity. He is a member of the Massachusetts 
State Medical Society, the East Middlesex 
District Medical Society, and the Boston 
Gynaecological Society. He is also con- 
nected with Fells Lodge, Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, and the Bean Hill 
Assembly, Royal Society of Good Fellows. 
He attends the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Dr. Nickerson is unmarried, and resides with 
his mother on Central Street. 



§OHN STEARNS, formerly a well- 
known milk dealer residing in Newton, 
was born October 31, 18 19, in Lunen- 
burg, Mass., son of Abel and Persis 
(Lawrence) Stearns. His great-grandfather 
was Thomas Stearns, who died in 181 1, at the 
age of eighty-six years; and his grandfather 
was Abel Stearns, who, born on April 9, 
1765, married Susanna Hartwell in 1786. 

When seven years old John Stearns left 
Lunenburg and went to Ash by, where he re- 
ceived a rudimentary education in the public 
schools. Until he was eighteen years of age 
he lived with his grandfather. Then, after 
working by the month at Ashby for two sea- 
sons, he spent a short time in Fitzwilliam, 
and came in 1838 to the farm in Newton 
where he afterward lived. Besides general 
farming he carried on a milk business in 
Newton. In politics he was a Republican, 
and he supported that party after he cast his 
first Presidential vote in 1840 for William 
Henry Harrison. Until twenty-five years ago 
he was a member of the First Congregational 
Church. He then joined the Congregational 
church at Newton Highlands, of which he was 
afterward an active member, contributing 
liberally to its support, and assisting materi- 
ally in building the new church edifice. 
During the last seven years of his life he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



missed but five Sundays in attending churchi 
service. 

Mr. Stearns was married on March 4, 1841, 
to Mary Ann Davis, daughter of Ebenezer 
Parker. She died in the following year, leav- 
ing one child, Mary Ann Parker. On April 
13, 1843, Mr. Stearns married Mary Cather- 
ine Livermore, of Alstead, N. H., who died in 
1897, leaving five children. The latter are: 
Ellen Augusta, Sarah Maria, Charles C, 
Harriet Adelaide, and Clara Frances. All 
the children were educated in the Newton 
public schools. Mary Ann is now Mrs. Levi 
Blethen, of Newton Centre. Ellen Augusta 
is the wife of D. W. Eagles, of Newton 
Centre. Sarah Maria married George E. 
Sanderson, of Medway. Charles C, who was 
engaged in business with his father, married 
Mary Curran. Harriet Adelaide, who resides 
in Medway, is the wife of Sumner Heman 
Clark. Clara Frances married Benjamin 
Adey, and lives at her father's home. Mr. 
Stearns had twelve grand-children and four 
great-grandchildren. He died February 17, 



OHN N. PARK, of South Chelms- 
ford, who carries on a successful busi- 
ness in forcing vegetables for the 
spring market, was born in Windham, 
Rockingham County, N. H., February 10, 
1 82 1, son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Nes- 
mith) Park. He grew to manhood in his na- 
tive town, and learned the trade of blacksmith 
from his father. Subsequently he was em- 
ployed in a woollen factory of Dracut, and in 
1850 he went from Chelmsford to California, 
crossing the Isthmus of Panama. He man- 
aged a milk farm in the vicinity of the mines 
for some time, when milk brought fifty cents a 
quart; and he was subsequently employed as a 
blacksmith at one hundred dollars a month, 
making cow-bells which sold at four dollars 
apiece. In 1853 he returned home. From 
that year until 1874 he was employed in fac- 
tories in Maine, New Hampshire, New York, 
Massachusetts, and Connecticut, usually hold- 
ing an important position. While he was 
superintendent in one mill, a two-and-a-half 
inch shaft broke, and Mr. Park's skill as a 



blacksmith was called into play to weld it. 
In 1874 he settled on his present farm, and for 
ten years devoted his time to growing berries. 
His profits did not repay his labor, however, 
and he turned his attention to vegetables with 
more satisfactory results. Beginning with one 
hot-house, twenty by one hundred feet, he now 
has fifteen houses, with an area of forty-two 
thousand feet of glass. He raises cucumbers, 
tomatoes, radishes, muskmelons, etc., market- 
ing about eight hundred bushels per annum. 
Mr. Park was married in 1848 to Miss 
Harriet M. Davis, who died leaving two chil- 
dren — John L. and Harriet E. The former 
died young; the latter has been teaching 
school in Mystic, Conn., for twenty-four 
years. On December 14, 1859, Mr. Park con- 
tracted a second marriage with Miss Rebecca 
Frances Titcomb, of Boscawen (now Webster), 
N. H. Alexander Joseph, his son by the pres- 
ent Mrs. Park, is associated with him in farm 
work. Alexander married Elizabeth P. Gar- 
land, of South Chelmsford, and now has three 
children — Ruth Agnes, Ethel Marie, and 
Alexander Garland. Mr. Park, Sr., is a 
stanch Republican. He has served as Select- 
man of the town, but he has no desire for po- 
litical preferment. In religious belief he is a 
Unitarian. Mrs. Park is a member of the 
Congregational church at Chelmsford Centre. 






DREW HORATIO PARK, a former 
resident of South Chelmsford, was a 
most remarkable man. Blind from 
birth, he acquired distinction as a 
scholar, and accomplished many things seem- 
ingly impossible to one devoid of sight. He 
was born April 11, 1819, in Windham, Rock- 
ingham County, N.H., son of Alexander and 
Elizabeth (Nesmith) Park. Educated in the 
Institution for the Blind at South Boston for 
the purpose of becoming a teacher, he distin- 
guished himself especially in mathematics. 
Rev. Thomas Hill, D.D., a gifted mathema- 
tician, who was at one time president of 
Harvard, was a great friend of Mr. Park's, 
and assisted him in his studies. Mr. Park 
taught natural philosophy, astronomy, alge- 
bra, and geometry. He was an enthusiastic 
astronomer, and illustrated his teaching by 






JOHN N. PARK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



diagrams on cloth. When about thirty-five 
years of age he visited a friend in Kentucky, 
and there achieved success as a book agent, 
travelling on horseback guided by a boy. 
With a taste for music and a fine ear, he was 
an expert in tuning pianos. About thirty 
years ago he moved to a farm in Chelms- 
ford adjoining that of his brother, John N. 
Park, and was occupied with its management 
throughout the rest of his life. 

As is often the case with the blind, Mr. 
Park's hearing was so acute as almost to com- 
pensate for the loss of his sight. By the vari- 
ation in the echo of footfalls he could detect 
the proximity of a person, object, or body of 
water, and thus avoid accident. He never 
failed to recognize a voice that he had once 
heard. When teaching he lived in Lowell, 
and, travelling to and from the school alone, 
was noted for his punctuality. He had no 
conception of light or darkness; but he kept 
in touch with the outer world, taking a lively 
interest in all that was passing, and had the 
paper read to him daily. He enjoyed a dis- 
cussion on any subject, from spiritualism to 
potatoes. A year's sickness ended in his 
death, February 22, 1897. In religious be- 
lief he was a Unitarian, though he was not 
connected with the church. 

On May 8, 1855, Mr. Park was married to 
Sophronia Walton, who had three children — 
Andrew Eddy, Louise J., and Walton N. 
On April 18, 1864, he was united to his 
wife's sister, Sarah T., widow of William 
Allen. She had two children by Mr. Allen, 
Arthur and Mary L., who became a part of 
Mr. Park's family. By Mr. Park she had 
four children — Howard L., Charles E., 
Philip R., and Fred Ware. 



'AMUEL TELLE, a well-known 
resident of Somerville, was born in 
a part of Charlestown now included 
within the limits of this city, in 
November, 18 18, son of Jonathan and Lydia 
(Hill) Teele. The Teele family has been set- 
tled in this section of the State, William 
Teel, the immigrant ancestor, came from Eng- 
land in Colonial days, and lived at Maiden 
and Charlestown. The men of this family 



have been successful farmers, and were the 
original owners of all the land in the neigh- 
borhood of what is now called Teele Square, 
Clarendon Hill, Somerville. 

Jonathan Teele, a representative of the 
fourth generation in this country, grandfather 
of Samuel, was a farmer and milkman, resid- 
ing in Medford and later in Charlestown. He 
fought for the American cause during the Rev- 
olutionary War. His wife was Lydia Cutter. 
Their son, Jonathan Teele, second, father of 
Samuel, was born in 1784. He lived for a 
time in Quincy, but most of his life was spent 
in Charlestown, where he was occupied with 
agricultural interests. The well-known Teele 
house at the head of Broadway on Clarendon 
Hill was built by him in 1836. He died at 
the age of sixty-seven years. He married 
Lydia, the daughter of William and Lydia 
(Perry) Hill, of West Cambridge, now Ar- 
lington. Only two of his eight children are 
now living. These are: Samuel, of Somer- 
ville, above named; and Rebecca, who is the 
wife of John Holmes, of Duxbury, Mass. 

Samuel Teele obtained his education in the 
Russell District School, Charlestown, and at 
Warren Academy in Woburn. He has been 
a farmer and gardener all his life upon the es- 
tate which he inherited from his father. In 
1859 Mr. Teele built a house opposite where 
he now resides; but in 1864 a portion of the 
estate was sold to Tufts College, and five 
years later he built his present residence, 
which is situated on Curtis Street, opposite 
the reservoir. 

Mr. Teele is married to Phoebe S. , daugh- 
ter of James and Abigail (Goodwin) Libbey, 
of Ossipee, N.H., and is the father of six 
children. Of these three are now living, two 
daughters and a son. Mr. Teele has never 
held office, though repeatedly urged to become 
a candidate for several important positions. 
His political principles are Republican. He 
is a member of the Baptist church. 



^^V 



lAM OSGOOD KNAPP, one 
the leading merchants in Newton 
Centre, was born in Bridgton, Me., 
in 1837, son of George and Caroline (Rose) 
Knapp. He is a representative of a highly 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



reputable family, which has long been identi- 
fied with Bridgton and Cumberland County, 
Maine, and which was founded in New Eng- 
land at an early date in the Colonial period. 
George Knapp, born in 1807, learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed for the 
greater part of his life in Bridgton, and died 
in 1867. Caroline Rose Knapp, his wife, 
who was a native of Newburyport, Mass., be- 
came the mother of nine children. Of these 
six are living, namely: William O., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Caroline, who married 
Gilbert Perry, and resides in Dubuque, la. ; 
Russell R., a resident of Boston; Ruth A., 
now Mrs. James Stover, of East Boston ; 
Thomas B. , a grocery dealer in Bridgton, 
Me. ; and Frederick P., a Deputy Sheriff of 
Suffolk County and a resident of Roslindale. 

William Osgood Knapp was educated in 
his native town, and resided there until he 
was nine'teen years old. In the spring of 
1856 he went to Boston, where he was em- 
ployed as a street-car driver for seven years. 
At the end of this time he became a conductor 
on the Boston & Worcester Railroad and 
later upon what is now the New England 
Railroad. In 1868 he engaged in the grocery 
business in Newton Centre, being associated 
for a year with B. T. Tylor, under the firm 
name of Tylor & Knapp. After Mr. Tylor' s 
withdrawal he formed a partnership with J. M. 
White as White & Knapp, who carried on 
business together until 1876; and for the suc- 
ceeding two years the firm was known as 
Knapp, Harmon & Co. Since 1878 Mr. 
Knapp has conducted business under the firm 
name of W. O. Knapp & Co., occupying a 
centrally located store in White's Block, 
Langley Road. He keeps a large stock of 
staple and fancy groceries, grain, flour, crock- 
ery, glass, and hardware; and his trade re- 
quires the assistance of five men and a lady 
book-keeper. In politics he is a Republican, 
and in 1877 he was Overseer of the Poor for 
Ward Six. He is a member of Morning 
Star Lodge, F. & A. M., of Woonsocket, 
R.I., and connected with several benefit so- 
cieties. 

In 1861 Mr. Knapp first married Sarah Jane 
Mears, a native of Vermont, who died in 
1878, leaving two daughters. These are: 



Alma M., born in 1868, and now the wife of 
J. E. Polio, of Boston; and Ella A., born in 
1876, who resides at home. Mr. Knapp's 
present wife, whom he wedded in March, 
1879, was before marriage Gertrude De Wolf 
Washburn, daughter of Hiram Washburn, of 
Salem, Mass. By this union there are three 
children, namely: Carl Barton, born in 1880, 
who is now assisting his father in the store; 
Joseph Morton, born in 1886; and Gertrude 
De Wolf, born in 1891. Mr. Knapp has 
gained an enviable reputation, both as an able 
business man and an upright citizen. He is 
a member of the Congregational church, of 
which at one time he acted as a Deacon. 



WFlliam F. 
was an able 
physician of 



STEVENS, M.D., 
le and highly esteemed 
physician of Stoneham in his time. 
Born in this town, January 7, 1807, he was 
the youngest son of the Rev. John H. Stevens, 
a well-known clergyman, who had a family of 
four sons and eight daughters. He acquired 
his early education in the district schools. 
At the age of ten years, a delicate and sensi- 
tive boy, he left his home to enter a dry- 
goods store in Charlestown, Mass. Two 
years later he began to learn the drug business 
with Dr. Plympton at Old Cambridge, where 
he remained three years, devoting his leisure 
time to the study of materia medica and 
therapeutics, with a view to preparing himself 
for the medical profession. In 1826 he en- 
tered the medical department of Dartmouth 
College, and during the intervals between the 
courses he continued his studies with Dr. 
Daniel Gould, of Reading, Mass. 

Having duly graduated, Dr. Stevens began 
the practice of his profession in Stoneham 
when he was twenty-one years old, and for 
over fifty years he faithfully fulfilled the 
duties which devolve upon a country practi- 
tioner. He was extremely devoted to his pro- 
fession, giving to it a restless energy which 
could only have been prompted by a conscien- 
tious desire to accomplish the best results in 
the shortest time possible. His noble charac- 
ter and many charitable deeds obtained for 
him the greatest respect of the community. 
He was a director of the Stoneham Branch 




NOAH S. KING. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Railway, the completion of which was in a 
great measure due to the influence he exerted 
in its behalf. A naturally quiet and reserved 
disposition prevented him from taking an ac- 
tive part in public affairs. His death on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1879, when he was seventy-two years 
old, following an illness of several months, 
was the cause of wide-spread sorrow. Among 
the many eulogies written upon his pure and 
honorable life, perhaps the finest is that pub-- 
lished in the History of Stoneham, issued 
some time since. 

Dr. Stevens was twice married. His first 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary J. G. 
Burnham, had four children, of whom the only 
survivor is William B., who was for twelve 
years the District Attorney of Middlesex 
County. His second marriage was contracted 
with Ellen A. Richardson, of Stoneham, a 
daughter of Captain Rufus and Martha (Gar- 
diner) Richardson. The Richardson family 
descended from two brothers who emigrated 
from England and were early settlers in Wo- 
burn; and the Gardiners originated with 
Richard Gardiner, the "Mayflower" Pilgrim. 
Mrs. Ellen A. Stevens had two children, one 
of whom died in infancy. Her other child, 
John H. Stevens, resides in Stoneham. She 
is still living, and occupies the residence of 
her late husband. 



»OAH S. KING, a well-known farmer 
and a leading citizen of Newton, was 
born in this town in 1816, son of 
Noah- and Esther (Hall) King. 
Mr. King's grandfather, John King, who was 
born in Sutton, Mass., studied medicine, came 
to Newton, and eventually settled here for 
practice. John boarded first with Noah Wis- 
wall, whose daughter Sarah he afterward mar- 
ried. Mr. Wiswall was at Lexington when 
seventy-six years of age, and it is related that 
he on that occasion asked one of the Americans 
to shoot at a certain British soldier, and that 
he secured the gun of the Englishman who 
was killed. It is said that he was the first 
Baptist in Newton, and it is known that he was 
active in organizing the First Baptist Church 
of Newton at Newton Centre. Dr. King was 
for many years the only physician in Newton. 



He was at Cambridge, and served as Cor- 
poral of the guard over Burgoyne's army 
while they were prisoners of war. Sophia 
King, one of his grand-daughters, was courted 
by a Mr. Parker, whom she finally jilted in 
order to marry Samuel Hall. Mr. Parker in 
consequence left the country, and went to the 
Sandwich Islands. Here he got into the good 
graces of King Kalakaiia, and was finally ap- 
pointed to a position in the Royal Council. 
When Kalakaua visited America, he came to 
Newton to see the place where Mr. Parker was 
born. 

Deacon Noah King was born at Newton 
Centre in 1766, so that he was nine years old 
when the war for independence began. He 
saw the killed, as they were brought from 
Lexington to their homes in Needham, and 
never forgot the sight. He followed the car- 
penter's trade and farming, and died in 1843. 
In politics he was a Federalist, afterwards a 
Whig. He was Deacon of the Baptist Church 
at Newton Centre for about forty years. 
Esther, his wife, a daughter of Edward and 
Esther (Fuller) Flail, of Newton, became the 
mother of eight children, of whom Noah S. is 
the only survivor. 

Noah S. King received his early education 
in the public schools of Newton and in 'a 
private school at Newton Centre. After leav- 
ing school, he began working on the farm, and 
has through life devoted himself chiefly to 
agriculture. His farm, which comprises sixty 
acres, is located on Brookline Street, in the 
Fifth Ward. He has been interested to a con- 
siderable extent in real estate. Mr. King 
remembers Newton as it was before any rail- 
road had been laid through it, and before there 
was a high school or water-works. He was 
one of the School Committee fifteen years 
and when the first high school was organized 
at Newtonville. The members of Mr. King's 
family attend the Baptist church at Newton 
Centre. When Mr. King was a boy, there 
were only four churches in the town, two at 
"the Centre," one at West Newton, and one 
at Lower Falls. His father at one time knew 
every person living within the boundaries of 
the town. In politics at first a Whig, Mr. 
King is now a Republican. He has taken an 
active interest in the affairs of the town and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in national questions. His first Presidential 
vote was cast for W. H. Harrison in 1840. 

Mr. King was married in 1848 to Sinia 
W. , daughter of Deacon Benjamin Burt, of 
Freetown, Mass. Her mother, Sinia, was a 
daughter of Joseph and Mary (Crane) Winslow, 
and a descendant of Kenelm, a brother of Gov- 
ernor Winslow. Mr. and Mrs. King have 
been the parents of four children, of whom 
Sarah E. and Lyman W. are living. Sarah 
E. , who was born in 1849, was graduated at 
the Newton High School and educated herself 
for a teacher. She taught several years in 
Newton and in Belmont. She married Rev. 
William M. Mick, of Buckhannon, W. Va., 
and now resides in Newton. Mr. Mick 
studied at Mount Union College in Ohio and 
at Newton Theological Institution. He has 
been pastor of four Baptist churches ; namely, 
at Windsor, Vt., Lambertville, N.J., Provi- 
dence, R.I. and Waltham, Mass., but owing 
to the failure of his health he is now engaged 
in the insurance business. His children are: 
Sinia v., born May 17, 1877; Alma E., born 
November 5, 1883; and Wendell K., born 
August 20, 1886. Lyman W., born in 1855, 
is a Baptist clergyman. He was educated at 
Brown University and at the Newton Theo- 
logical Institution, and was pastor at Mount 
Holly, Vt., for over six years. He is now 
pastor of a church in West Roxbury, while he 
resides in Newton. He married Miss Lucy 
F. Westgate, of Plainfield, N.H., and their 
children are: Florence E., born April 10, 
1886; Sinia F., born February 16, 1888; and 
Ralph W. , born January 24, 1892. Another 
son, Stillman B. , who was born in 1852, died 
December 7, 1892. He was educated in the 
schools of Newton and at the Providence Con- 
ference Seminary at East Greenwich, R.I. 
He was in the wholesale produce business in 
Boston. He was a member and one of the 
founders of the Marketmen's Republican Club 
of Boston, and was its first president, to which 
office after one year's service he was re-elected 
for another term. He was also Captain of the 
Roxbury Horse Guards. His wife was Lizzie 
P., daughter of Isaac Kingsbury, of Needham. 
He left one child, Harold G., born February 
21, 1892, and now living with his mother at 
45 Waumbeck Street, Ro.xbury. The other 



child of Noah S. King was Sinia A., who 
was born in 1859, ^^'^ died when four years 
old. 



1:1 



ARREN P. TYLER, a well-known 
and highly respected resident of 
Newton, was actively identified 
with the mercantile interests of Boston for 
half a century. A native of North Andover, 
Mass., born in 1821, he is a son of Parker 
Tyler. The emigrant ancestor of the family 
from which he is descended was Job Tyler, 
who was born in Shropshire, England, in 
16 19. In 1640 Job was a resident of Co- 
chichawicke, Mass., and was subsequently one 
of the first settlers of Andover. His son 
Moses, the next in line of descent, was born 
in Andover, Mass., in 1667, and died in 1732. 
Moses married Prudence, daughter of George 
and Dorothy Blake. 

Abraham Tyler, the paternal grandfather of 
Warren P., was born in Boxford, Mass., in 
Colonial days. He was Sergeant of a com- 
pany of minute-men, responded to the Lexing- 
ton alarm, April 19, 1775, and afterward 
served in the Revolutionary army, having 
been with Washington at New York. Parker 
Tyler was born in Boxford in 1778. Subse- 
quently he moved to Andover, and died in 
that town in 1S56. He was a farmer and 
shoemaker by occupation. On March 31, 
1802, he married Rebecca Johnson, who was 
born in Andover in 1783, and died there in 
1858. They reared eleven children, of whom 
four are still living, namely: Rebecca, now 
Mrs. Harris; Leonard, who resides in Dakota; 
Charles, a resident of Illinois; and Warren 
P., the subject of this sketch. 

Warren P. Tyler left school when a lad of 
fourteen years to work on a farm in Danvers, 
Mass., where he remained five years. Going 
thence to Boston, he entered a clothing house 
as a boy of all work. Soon after he was pro- 
moted to the post of salesman, and he contin- 
ued with that firm seventeen years. Then, 
being familiar with the details of the busi- 
ness, he established himself in the clothing 
trade as senior member of the firm of Tyler & 
Studley on Court Street. After this firm had 
carried on a very successful and lucrative 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



business for twenty-five years, he retired, and 
spent the following two years in travelling on 
the continent of Europe. In iS6o he took 
up his residence in Newton, and has since 
been intimately associated with the town's 
best interests. 

Mr. Tyler has served as a member of the 
Common Council and as an Alderman; has 
been one of the Board of Trustees of the New- 
ton Savings Bank and of the Newton Hospital; 
has been a director and trustee of the Newton 
and Watertown Gas Light Company ; has be- 
longed to the Newton Cemetery Association 
for thirty years; and for thirty-five years has 
been connected with the Children's Mission 
in Boston, the oldest institution of the kind 
in America. In politics he was formerly a 
strong anti-slavery man. Now he is a stanch 
Republican. He is liberal in his religious 
beliefs, and an active member of the Unitarian 
church of this city. He was married in 1857 
to Harriet A., daughter of John W. Mulliken, 
a lumber dealer of Charlestown, Mass. They 
have no children. 



]CjDWARD WELLINGTON, a farmer 
Fl and milkman of Waltham, was born 
"^^ ■- " here in 1855, son of Benjamin and 
Mary Elizabeth (Stearns) Wellington. He 
traces his ancestry back through nine genera- 
tions to Roger Wellington, who came to this 
country in 1630, settling in Charlestown, 
Mass. His great-grandfather fought in the 
Revolutionary War, and was one of the heroes 
of the battle of Lexington. His grandfather, 
Richard Wellington, was born in Lexington, 
where he lived all his life, and carried on 
general farming. Richard married Hannah 
Moore, of Stow, and they had three children. 
Benjamin Wellington, youngest child of 
Richard, and also a native of Lexington, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools 
of that town and at the Lexington Academy. 
Although he did some business in Boston, 
the greater part of his time was spent in gen- 
eral farming, which he carried on at Waltham. 
He was a member of the School Committee 
and one of the Selectmen for a number of 
years. His wife, Mary Elizabeth, a daughter 
of Phineas Stearns, of Waltham, had five chil- 



dren, of whom Edward was the youngest. 
The family attended the First Parish Church. 
Benjamin Wellington died at the age of 
seventy-five years, and his wife at the age of 
sixty-three years. 

Edward Wellington, the subject of this 
sketch, completed the course of the common 
schools of his native town, and entered the 
high school in 1872. Afterward he attended 
the Swedenborgian School for some time, and 
in 1873 he matriculated at Harvard Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1877. Sub- 
sequently, on account of his poor health and 
that of his father, he returned to the farm, 
where he has remained up to the present time. 
He carries on general farming to some extent, 
but makes a specialty of dairy farming, in 
which he is very successful, keeping from 
thirty-five to forty head of cattle, besides hav- 
ing a milk route in Cambridge and Waltham. 
He is a member of no lodge, though he has 
been urged to become so, preferring to lead a 
quiet life. In 1882 he married Mary, the 
daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Worcester. 
They have had seven children, of whom one 
died in infancy. The others are: Elizabeth 
Mary, Richard, Joseph Worcester, Catharine, 
Miriam, and Benjamin. 



,ICHARD DEXTER, a retired busi- 
ness man of Maiden and a part owner 
of one of the oldest estates in the 
town, was born May 18, 1824, son 
of Richard and Jerusha (Baldwin) Dexter. 
He and his brother Samuel represent the sixth 
generation of the family that has occupied the 
property. His grandfather, a sea captain by 
occupation, was a Revolutionary patriot, par- 
ticipated in the battle of Bunker Hill, and 
lived to be eighty-six years old. The maiden 
name of the grandmother was Martha Hatch. 

Mr. Dexter's father was a farmer, and re- 
sided here until his death, which occurred at 
the age of thirty-one years. His mother, 
Jerusha, was a daughter of Captain Jonathan 
Baldwin, an officer in the early State militia. 
She became the mother of four children — 
Mary, Samuel G., Richard, and Martha. 
Martha died in infancy. Mary married Jo- 
seph Baldwin, of Fitchburg, Mass., and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in that town, leaving three children — Samuel 
D., Mary C, and Martha D. Baldwin. Sam- 
uel D. Baldwin married Caroline Blood, and 
has three daughters — Margory, Carrie, and 
Josephine Baldwin. Samuel G. Dexter mar- 
ried Hannah E. Page, of Fryeburg, Me. ; and 
his children are George P. and Martha P. 
The latter is now the wife of James E. Harris, 
of Maiden. 

Richard Dexter, the subject of this sketch, 
was educated in Maiden. When a young man 
he went to Fitchburg, where he learned the 
trade of millwright. He later went to Flor- 
ida, and, having erected" a saw-mill, was for 
about three years there engaged in manufact- 
uring hard pine lumber. Subsequently, in 
company with his brother, he entered the 
wooden-ware business at the corner of Central 
and Broad Streets, Boston; and, after carrying 
on a profitable enterprise for fifteen years, 
they retired to the farm, and have since culti- 
vated the property jointly. The estate origi- 
nally contained three hundred and sixty acres, 
seventy of which have been taken by the Met- 
ropolitan Park Commission. The Dexter 
homestead, however, is still one of the largest 
estates in Maiden. The present mansion, 
which was built by Mr. Dexter and his 
brother, Samuel G. Dexter, in 1S49, is the 
third dwelling erected upon the site since the 
property came into the family's possession. 
It is a beautiful country-seat; and among its 
most notable attractions is a mammoth elm- 
tree, which is admired by strangers visiting 
the city. The Dexter elm, which is said to 
be the largest in the State, has a circumfer- 
ence of twenty-nine feet at its base, and meas- 
ures twenty-one feet at the height of six feet 
from the ground. It is over one hundred and 
ten feet high, and Rks/a spread of one hundred 
and four feet froni iidrth-east to south-west. 
Some of its branches are three feet in di- 
ameter, and it is estimated to contain twenty- 
six cords of wood. 

On June 15, 1847, Mr. Dexter was united 
in marriage with Julia A. Dole, of Fitchburg, 
daughter of Stephen and Hannah (Murdock) 
Dole. Mrs. Dexter has had four children, 
namely: Richard F., who died at the age of 
twenty-one; Julia E., who is the wife of 
Allen E. Stevens, Jr., of Maiden, and has six 



children — ^ Alice R., Frank Dexter, Edith 
Louisa, Dexter, Marguerite, and Howard A. ; 
Rebecca P., who died at the age of fifteen; 
and Annie M., who married Arthur W. 
Walker, of the firm of Walker, Pratt & Co., 
Boston. Mrs. Walker has had four children : 
Marguerite and George W., both of whom 
died in infancy; Richard D., now aged six 
years; and Elizabeth D., born September 6, 
1897. Mr. and Mrs. Dexter celebrated their 
golden wedding on June 15, 1S97. Mr. Dex- 
ter cast his first Presidential vote for Zachary 
Taylor in 1848, and has been a Republican 
since the formation of that party. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 



ORATIO NELSON HYDE, the 
tenth child and seventh son of Aaron 
Hyde and Patty Hovey Hyde, was 
born in Newton, Mass., January 26, 
1814, and died here, December 15, 1S90. 
Jonathan Hyde, his lineal ancestor, and Sam- 
uel Hyde, brother of Jonathan, came from 
England in April, 1639, and settled in that 
part of Cambridge then known as Nonantum, 
which afterward, in 1691, was incorporated as 
the town of Newton. The two brothers were 
descended from the family in England of 
which Sir Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, 
was a member. They became men of sub- 
stance, purchased large tracts of land, en- 
gaged in farming, and brought up large fami- 
lies, whose descendants for many generations 
have been among the useful citizens of Boston, 
Cambridge, and Newton. Jonathan, who was 
born in 1626 and died in 171 1, was twice 
married, and had twenty-one children. 

Aaron Hyde, following the custom of Mid- 
dlesex land-owners in the beginning of this 
century, united a trade with the calling of 
husbandry. His winters were devoted to 
shoemaking, the remainder of the year to 
farming. His father, Elisha Hyde, was born 
in the ancestral house still standing at the 
foot of Oak Hill in Newton. Tradition says 
that EUsha's wife, on the morning after a 
memorable night in 1773, found tea in his 
shoes. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War and a stanch supporter of the patriot 




HORATIO N. HYDE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cause. The father of Aaron's wife, Ebenezer 
Hovey, also bore arms in the war for Ameri- 
can independence. 

The subject of this sketch, after obtaining 
his education in Newton, followed the pur- 
suits of a carpenter and master builder, mer- 
chant, and real estate dealer. He served as 
Tax Collector, was Justice of the Peace for 
many years, and guardian of wards. His 
last years were occupied in looking after his 
own property and attending to the interests 
of his wards. He was a modest, upright, 
honorable man, punctual in the performance 
and discharge of his obligations and duties, 
and kind and lenient in his treatment of those 
with whom he came in contact. 

He united with the Baptist Church in New- 
ton Centre at the age of eighteen, and in 
1859 was one of the founders of Immanuel 
Baptist Church, Newton, where, until his 
death in his seventy-seventh year, he was an 
active member and a Deacon. He was dark- 
haired, dark-eyed, dark-complexioned, a little 
under the average size, erect in carriage, 
modest in demeanor, and deliberate in speech, 
and, withal, a man of sterling integrity. 

In 1836 Horatio Nelson Hyde married 
Olivia Whiting Fiske, daughter of Calvin 
and Patty (Pratt) Fiske, of Natick, Mass. 
She was born in 18 16. Her paternal grand- 
father, Joshua Fiske, was a Captain in the 
Revolutionary army; and her maternal grand- 
father, Cyrus Pratt, also served in the ranks 
of the patriots throughout the same war. Of 
this marriage four children were born, two 
sons and two daughters — Horatio Nelson, 
Jr., Hosea, Andelia Elizabeth, and Sarah 
Fiske. Both of the sons served in the Civil 
War, Horatio Nelson, Jr., in Company B, 
Forty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment Volun- 
teers, and Hosea in Company K, Thirty-sec- 
ond Massachusetts Regiment Volunteers. 
Hosea Hyde was twice wounded, first at 
Gettysburg and again at Cold Harbor. 

Horatio Nelson Hyde, Jr., married Anna 
Mary Davis, and has one son, Henry Nelson 
Hyde. Hosea Hyde married Henrietta 
Mellen Beals, and has one daughter, Andelia 
Elizabeth. Andelia Elizabeth Hyde married 
Samuel W. Morse, and died in 1869, without 
leaving issue. Sarah Fiske Hyde married 



Jesse C. Ivy, and has four children — Malcolm 
Hyde, Florence and Mildred (twins), and 
Ruth. ■ 

In the ancient burying-ground on the left of 
Centre Street, as one goes from Newton to 
Newton Centre, repose the bodies of the 
lineal ancestors of Horatio Nelson Hyde, 
from Jonathan, who died in 171 1, to Aaron, 
who died in 1859. On the slate stones which 
mark their graves may be read their official 
titles — Ensign, Lieutenant, Deacon, Select- 
man, and others; and the records of the 
town, churches, and city, disclose that the 
family rendered efficient service in peace and 
in war in the upbuilding of the town, the 
churches, the city, and the Commonwealth. 



f^o 



EORGE PARKER, of Watertown, 
V I^ST" Mass., is a native of Cambridge, and 

— belongs to an old Middlesex County 
family. He was born on May 26, 1837, son 
of William and Hannah (Stearns) Parker. 
His grandfather Parker and his great-grand- 
father each bore the name Abijah. They 
were natives of Pepperell, Mass. Abijah 
Parker, Sr., served as Lieutenant of a com- 
pany raised in that town during the Revolu- 
tion, and after his discharge from the army he 
followed agricultural pursuits in Pepperell for 
the rest of his life. He married Sarah Law- 
rence, and reared several children. 

The eldest of these was Abijah Parker, Jr., 
who for a number of years was United States 
inspector of beef in Charlestown, Mass. His 
last years were spent in Dedham, Mass., 
where he died at the age of sixty-two. He 
was married to Sally Woods, daughter of Cap- 
tain Isaac Woods, of Pepperell, the com- 
mander of the first company raised in that 
town for service in the war for independence. 
By this union there were three children, Will- 
iam, above named, being the eldest-born. 

William Parker was reared and educated in 
Pepperell, his native town. He succeeded his 
father as government inspector of beef, and 
held that position until his death, which oc- 
curred when he was fifty years old. In poli- 
tics he was a Democrat, and in his religious 
views a Unitarian. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Hannah Stearns, became the mother 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of six children, of whom the only survivors 
are: George, the subject of this sketch; and 
Daniel S. Mrs. Hannah S. Parker died at 
the age of thirty-three years. She was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

George Parker obtained his education at a 
private school in Cambridge, at schools in 
Dedham, Newton, and Sudbury, Mass., in 
Salem, N.H., where for a time he worked on 
a farm summers and attended school winters, 
and in Waltham, Mass., where he resided four 
years. Coming to Watertown when nineteen 
years old, he served an apprenticeship of seven 
years at the carriage-smith's trade; and during 
that tim.e he helped to iron five thousand gun- 
carriage wheels for the United States govern- 
ment. On April 15, 1864, Mr. Parker joined 
the Watertown police force as a patrolman, 
serving as such until 1890, when he was ap- 
pointed Chief of Police, a position held for 
five years. He has served as Constable for the 
past thirty-five years, was an engineer of the 
fire department two years, and was formerly 
truant officer. In an official position which 
is at certain times far from being an agreeable 
one, he has served the town ably and faith- 
fully; and his management of the police de- 
partment has been exceedingly satisfactory. 
Politically, he is a Republican. 

On December 17, 1862, Mr. Parker married 
Charlotte Boynton, daughter of David Boyn- 
ton, of Sullivan, N.H. He has had two chil- 
dren, one of whom is living, namely: George 
S., who was born September 4, 1864, is now 
cashier of the Union Market National Bank of 
Watertown, and has been Auditor of the town 
of Watertown for the past eight years. On 
February 12, 1890, George S. Parker was mar- 
ried to Alice B. Swett, daughter of Captain 
John Swett, of Wellfleet, Mass. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Parker attend the Baptist 
church. 



YfT^ODN 



lODNEY M. LUCAS, one of West 
Jewton's best known residents and a 
veteran of the Civil War, is a na- 
tive of Northumberland, N.H. He 
was born in 1824, son of I>e Grand and Su- 
sanna (Marshall) Lucas, natives of Northum- 
berland. His grandfather, Major James 



Lucas, was a commissioned officer in the Rev- 
olutionary War. His great-grandfather, who 
was a Scotchman, married a German woman, 
and was a ferryman between Boston and Cam- 
bridge, at the point where Craigie's Bridge 
crosses the Charles River. The name of 
Major James Lucas, whose commission was 
signed by Colonel Timothy Bedee, was placed 
upon the United States pension rolls in 1832. 
He died in 1834. 

Le Grand Lucas, Rodney M. Lucas's 
father, in early life was a prosperous farmer 
in Northumberland, and later engaged in the 
provision business in Boston. He resided in 
West Newton for many years, and died here 
at the age of seventy -three years. Susanna 
Marshall Lucas, his wife, whom he married in 
1816, became the mother of five children, of 
whom four are living; namely, Rodney M., 
Milo, Julia A., and Anna W. Julia A. is 
now Mrs. William P. Houghton; and Anna 
W. is the wife of George H. Brigham, of Bol- 
ton, Mass. All except Anna live in West 
Newton. 

Rodney M. Lucas resided in his native 
town until seven years old. Then he accom- 
panied his parents to Weston, Mass., and two 
years later he came to West Newton. His 
education was for the most part acquired in 
the schools of this town, and after completing 
it he learned the carpenter's trade. In 1849 
the excitement caused by the discovery of gold 
in California induced him to try his fortune in 
the mines, and, going to the Pacific Coast by 
way of Cape Horn, he remained in California 
and Oregon for three years. Upon his return 
he resumed his trade, and followed it as a 
journeyman until 1862, when he enlisted 
as a private in Company B, Forty-fourth 
Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, 
under Captain John M. Griswold and Colonel 
Francis L. Lee. His regiment was attached 
to Stephenson's brigade, Eighteenth Army 
Corps; and he saw his first active service in 
North Carolina. He participated in the 
battles of Kingston, White Hall, Goldsboro, 
and Little Washington, and was honorably 
discharged in January, 1863, on account of 
physical disability. He now draws a pension 
of eight dollars per month. After some time 
spent in recuperation he engaged in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2'S 



building business, employing a large force of 
workmen, and erecting many fine dwelling- 
houses in this locality, and finally retired 
from active business pursuits, with an honor- 
able record of thirty years as a carpenter and 
builder. He has dealt quite extensively in 
real estate, and his business career has been 
attended with good financial results. 

Mr. Lucas served as Constable for thirty 
years, was chief engineer of the fire depart- 
ment four years, served one year upon the 
police force, and in politics he is a Republi- 
can. A member of the Veteran Firemen's 
Association of Newton, he was for six years 
its president; and he is a Past Commander of 
Charles Ward Post, No. 62, G. A. R. He 
attends the Baptist church. In 1853 he 
was united in marriage with Jane S. Flagg, 
daughter of Levi Flagg, of Boylston, Mass. 
Mr, and Mrs. Lucas have one son, Walter M., 
born in 1857, now a well-known carpenter of 
West Newton. Walter M. Lucas wedded 
Mary V. Hickey, and has one child, Kenneth 
Rodney Lucas, born July 28, 1894. 



place. 



'ETH ELLIS BENSON, dealer in 
wood and coal at 22 Tremont 
Street, Melrose, Mass., is one of 
the substantial business men of the 
and holds a high position among its 
most valued citizens. He was born January 
4, 1828, in Boston, Mass., a son of Seth Ellis 
Benson, Sr. His paternal grandfather, 
Stephen Benson, who was born and reared in 
Massachusetts, married Anna Cummings; and, 
migrating to Maine, he was prosperously en- 
gaged as a blacksmith and tavern-keeper until 
his death. 

Seth Ellis Benson, Sr., was born at Otis- 
field, Me., in 1802. Coming to Massachu- 
setts when a young man, he located himself 
in Boston, and made a fortune in real estate 
speculations. -In 1837 he returned to Maine, 
and, taking up his abode in the city of Ban- 
gor, was engaged as a commission merchant, 
and did the commission business for the State 
of Maine. He died in 187 1. He married 
Eleanor Grace Dean, of Portland, Me., in 
1826. They had nine children, of whom but 
three are living, namely: Seth Ellis; Stephen 



Dean, of Bangor, Me. ; and Charles Russell, 
of Philadelphia, Pa. One of their sons, 
George H., enlisted in the navy as Ensign, 
was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and 
placed in command of the brigantine "Horace 
Beals, " a supply vessel. He lost one-half his 
crew of yellow fever between New Orleans 
and Mobile, and on the day after his arrival 
at the latter city died himself of the same 
dread disease, and was buried on Santa Rosa 
Island. Two other sons, Benjamin C. and 
Stephen D., both enlisted in the Bangor com- 
pany of the Second Maine Volunteer Infantry, 
and Benjamin was drowned in the Potomac 
River. Stephen was wounded at the battle 
of Fredericksburg and again at the battle of 
the Wilderness. Three of their daughters — 
Sarah Ellen, Mary Eliza, and Anna Rebecca 
— were teachers in Bangor, and the first 
named had the distinction of being the first 
instructor in the Bangor High School. Mary 
E. Benson was intensely patriotic, and when 
the Heavy Artillery Company left for the war 
she presented it with a flag. Charles Russell, 
an expert buyer of dress goods, who does a 
great deal of business in Europe, was for 
twenty-two years connected with the firm of 
R. H. White & Co., of Boston. 

Seth Ellis Benson resided with his parents 
in East Boston in his childhood, and in order 
to attend school in the city proper he had to 
row across the harbor. VVhen nine years of 
age he removed to Bangor, where he com- 
pleted his schooling. From the age of twelve 
to twenty years he was engaged as a clerk in 
stores of various kinds in Bangor, and gained 
a valuable business experience. In 1848 he 
went to East Thomaston, now Rockland, Me., 
where he learned the details of the clothing 
business, in which he was subsequently en- 
gaged on his own account until 1870. Com- 
ing then to Melrose, he established himself as 
wood and coal dealer, and has since built 
up an extensive and lucrative trade in this 
vicinity. He has also added to his income 
by dealing to some extent in real estate in 
Melrose, Wakefield, Stoneham, and Maiden. 

In politics a loyal Republican, Mr. Benson 
is actively interested in anything likely to ad- 
vance the welfare and prosperity of his 
adopted town. He is now chairman of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Sewer Commissioners of Melrose and presi- 
dent of the Lead-lined Pipe Company of 
Wakefield. He is well known in financial 
circles as vice-president of the Melrose Na- 
tional Bank and as one of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Melrose Savings Bank. Frater- 
nally, he is a member and a trustee of 
Fardell Lodge, No. 115, K. of P.; a member 
of Aurora Lodge, F. & A. M., of Rockland, 
Me. ; of Rockland Chapter, R. A. M. ; and of 
Clairmont Commandery, K. T. He is also 
connected with several other organizations, 
and is a charter member of the Melrose So- 
cial Club. 

Mr. Benson and Hannah Elizabeth Hall, 
daughter of Ephraim and Catherine (Speer) 
Hall, of Rockland, Me., were married in De- 
cember, 1852. They have no children. 



the fi 



iM BEGGS, a respected resi- 
of Woburn and a member of 
the firm of Beggs & Cobb, extensive 
tanners, is a native of Canada West. He was 
born in 1844, son of William and Catherine 
(Pringle) Beggs. The father, who was born 
in Scotland in the year 1800, emigrated to 
this country when young, settling first in 
Dunkirk, N.Y. He later moved to a farm 
in Canada, where he resided for the rest of 
his life, and died in 1858. His wife, Cath- 
erine, a native of Canada, whom he married 
in 1825, became the. mother of nine children, 
of whom four are living. These are: John, a 
successful grain broker in Chicago; Will- 
iam, the subject of this sketch; Martha, who 
married William Baimbridge, of Oshawa, Can- 
ada ; and Thornas; George, a tanner in Conflu- 
ence, Pa. Mrs.' Catherine Beggs died in 1891. 
William Beggs was educated in his native 
town, and remained at home until he was 
seventeen years old. He began to learn the 
tanner's trade in Oshawa. In 1861 he came 
to Woburn, where he found employment at 
Thompson's tannery on Water Street. After 
finishing his apprenticeship he worked as a 
journeyman for Horace Conn & Co. Later he 
was in the employment of S. O. Pollard & Co. 
for two years, and the superintendent of White 
& Osborn's tannery for five years. In 1880 



he formed a copartnership with E. W. Cobb, of 
Maiden, with whom he has since been asso- 
ciated. This concern operate large tanneries 
in Woburn and Winchester, Mass., and in 
Watsontown, Pa. The three plants have a ca- 
pacity for treating one thousand hides per day, 
and employ an average of four hundred and 
fifty men. The raw hides come from Liver- 
pool and different parts of the United States; 
and the bark is brought from Maine, New 
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, New Brunswick, 
and other parts of Canada. The tanneries in 
this State make a specialty of heavy split and 
upper leather, while the Pennsylvania plant 
produces fancy colored leather of a lighter 
grade. About fifty-five per cent, of the output 
is sold in the domestic market, the balance 
being exported chiefly to England. The firm 
has a large wholesale establishment at 82 
Summer Street, Boston. 

The factories are equipped with modern ma- 
chinery. Mr. Beggs, who is one of the most 
expert tanners in this section of the country, 
besides introducing some new methods of treat- 
ing hides, has improved the Union Splitting 
Machine, which is extensively used in the 
business. 

In politics Mr. Beggs is a Republican. He 
was formerly a member of the Board of Select- 
men. He served two years in the Common 
Council, and he represented the town in the 
Massachusetts legislature for one term. He is 
connected with Mount Horeb Lodge, F. & 
A. M. ; with Woburn Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; with Hugh de Payens Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Melrose; and with the 
Massachusetts Consistory in Boston. In Feb- 
ruary, 1873, he was united in marriage with 
Mary Louise Richardson, daughter of Daniel 
and Louise (Gleason) Richardson. Their 
children are: William E., born in 1874; 
Daniel R., born in 1876; and Sidney Adams, 
born in 1888. William E. Beggs graduated 
from the Woburn High School, took a three 
years' course at Harvard University, and is 
now book-keeper for Beggs & Cobb, at their 
store in Boston. Daniel R., who is also a 
graduate of the Woburn High School, is em- 
ployed at the tannery; and Sidney A. is 
attending school. Both Mr. and Mrs. Beggs 
attend the Congregational church, 




WILLIAM BEGGS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



/WIeORGE EGBERT BRIDGES, for 
\|ST many years a prominent and infiuen- 
^ — tial resident of Newton, was born in 
VVatertown, Mass., July ii, 1827, of Welsh 
ancestry. He received his early education in 
the common schools of VVatertown and New- 
ton, completing it at a private school. When 
about eighteen years old he became a clerk 
in the dry-goods store of Albert Billings at 
Newton Upper Ealls. Four years later he 
bought a store of general merchandise at New- 
ton Centre, becoming the junior member of 
a copartnership formed with H. H. Hazelton. 
After two years he purchased his partner's 
interest, carried on the business alone for 
three years, and then sold at an advantage. 

In 1852 Mr. Bridges went to New York 
City, where he embarked in the railway sup- 
ply business with the firm of Bridges & 
Brother. Returning then to Boston, he con- 
tinued in the same line of business as one of 
the partners of Holt, Bridges & Co., for three 
years. Selling his interest in that firm, he 
engaged in the same business as the head of 
the firm of Bridges & Long, which was located 
on Water Street, Boston, for eight years. Mr. 
Long sold his share of the business to Mr. 
Whitney, who became senior member of the 
firm of Whitney & Bridges. A few years 
later, on the admission of William Stearns, 
this name was changed to that of Whitney, 
Bridges & Stearns, which continued the style 
of the firm until its dissolution in 1876. 
Since that time Mr. Bridges has lived retired 
from active pursuits, enjoying a well-deserved 
rest. 

In 1 868 he was chosen Selectman of New- 
ton, and served four years. For a number of 
years he rendered valuable service to the town 
as an engineer of the fire department, and he 
has also been Surveyor of Highways and Over- 
seer, of the Poor. In 1868 he was a member 
of the Massachusetts House of Representa- 
tives, and he has served as chairman of the 
Board of Registrars since it was created by 
law. In politics he is a stanch Democrat; 
and his popularity as a citizen is attested by 
the fact that Newton, the banner Republican 
city of the State, has so often elected him to 
offices of trust. He was made a Mason in 
Pequossit Lodge, F. & A. M., of Water- 



town. He is the oldest brother, a charter 
member, and the first Past Master of Dal- 
housie Lodge, of Newton; Past High Priest 
of Newton Chapter, R. A. M. ; a member of 
Gethsemane Commandery, K.T., and of the 
Massachusetts Lodge of Perfection; and he is 
one of the select few who have taken the 
thirty-second degree. An esteemed member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, he is one 
of the society's trustees. 

Mr. Bridges was married December 25, 
1849, to Abbie F. , daughter of Oliver and 
Lucy (Everett) Smith, of this city. Their 
only son, George Marcus Bridges, born in 
Newton in 1868, graduated from the Newton 
High School in 1887, and is now engaged in 
the manufacture of shoe-stain in Boston. He 
married Alice, daughter of Levi R. and Nar- 
cissa (Fellows) Weeks, of Laconia, N. H., 
and makes his home with his father. 



2EVI W. ADAMS, a well-known car- 
penter of Medford and a naval vet- 
^ eran of the Civil War, was born in 
Boothbay, Me., March 24, 1839, son 
of James and Mary C. Adams. Ancestors of 
the family went from Wales to Londonderry, 
Ireland, where they resided for a time, and 
then emigrated to America. They settled in 
Boothbay, and among them was the great- 
great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch. 
His great-grandfather, Samuel A. Adams, was 
born in Boothbay in 1733. Boothbay, also, 
in 1775, was the birthplace of his grandfather, 
David R. Adams, who resided there all his 
life. James Adams, who was likewise a na- 
tive of Boothbay, born in 1807, died at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital in 1840, when 
Levi was a year old; and the family was 
scattered. 

Levi W. Adams was educated in the public 
schools of his native town. Going to Boston 
in 1856, he served an apprenticeship at the 
carpenter's trade. During the latter part of 
the Civil War he was in the United States 
navy. After his discharge he resumed his 
trade, and was employed as a journeyman 
until 1873, Then he engaged in business for 
himself as a builder, and afterward followed 
it successfully for nearly twenty years. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1891 his health became so feeble that he was 
compelled to go South in order to recuperate. 
After spending some time in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., where he derived much benefit from 
the mild climate, he returned to Medford. 
He is now connected with O. H. l^riko & 
Son, Boston builders. 

In politics Mr. Adams is a Republican, and 
he has served as delegate to several party con- 
ventions. I^e is a member of Medford Com- 
mandery, No. 375, United Order of the 
Golden Cross, and a comrade of S. C. Law- 
rence Post, No. 66, G. A. R. Taking an 
active interest in religious work, he is a trus- 
tee of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. 
In 1858 he was united in marriage with Bet- 
sey Cole, a native of Deer Isle, Me. He has 
two sons and one daughter living. Levi W. 
Adams, Jr., a jeweller of Boston, is married, 
and resides in Medford. His other son, who 
is United States Inspector of Public Works, 
lives in Auburndale, Mass. ; and his daughter 
resides at home. 



§OHN GREEN UPTON was an enter- 
prising and successful business man of 
Tyngsboro. A native of Dunstable, 
Mass., born in 1824, he was a son of 
Jonathan Upton. After his mother's death 
he began work for Captain Joseph Danforth, 
who, in company with Simon Thompson, car- 
ried on a mill in Tyngsboro. He eventually 
married one of Captain Danforth's daughters. 
Afterward, assisted financially by his father- 
in-law, he purchased the mill, and engaged in 
grinding grain, carding wool, sawing lumber, 
and the manufacture of boxes. He invested 
quite largely in wild land, from which he cut 
and hauled the lumber, selling the ship tim- 
ber and using the smaller logs at his mill. 
For a period of thirty years he employed a 
large number of men. At times he had a 
million feet of logs in the yard and the mill- 
pond, and he owned four hundred acres of tim- 
ber land. The box industry alone was exceed- 
ingly profitable, as he had the facilities for 
filling large orders. The mill is still furnish- 
ing boxes to the same concern that began to 
use them when he first started in business. 
By attending closely to his business, person- 



ally superintending every detail, he gained a 
high reputation. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican. He was an active member of the Uni- 
tarian church, and contributed generously 
toward its support. In his earlier years he 
was connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He retained his interest in his 
business to the last. His death, which oc- 
curred June 6, 1893, when he was sixty-nine 
years old, was sincerely regretted by the en- 
tire community, especially by his employees, 
some of whom had been with him for many 
years. 

John G. Upton first married Mary Danforth, 
who died a few years after. By that union 
there were three daughters: Elmira C. and 
Abbie D., who are residing in Tyngsboro; 
and Mary R., who died at the age of seventeen 
years. Mr. Upton's second marriage was con- 
tracted with Adeline Wilson, a daughter of 
Stephen Wilson. Married at nineteen, she 
died at thirty-two, leaving one daughter ^ — 
Clara Adeline. Subsequently Mr. Upton 
wedded her sister, Lydia Ann Wilson, who 
died less than a year after marriage. Jennie 
Haggett, of Lyndeboro, N. H., who became 
Mr. Upton's fourth wife, survived him two 
and a half years. She had two children, one 
of whom is deceased. The other is John, who 
is engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business in Boston. Clara Adeline, who pos- 
sesses many of the sterling qualities that char- 
acterized her father, married Andrew Payson 
Hadley, who is now manager of the Upton 
saw-mill and box factory. She has two chil- 
dren : Albert Clinton, who is attending the 
Lowell Commercial School; and May Frances, 
a pupil of the Lowell High School. 



ENRY JOSIAH LOCKE, one of the 
well-to-do market gardeners of Ar- 
lington, was born in this town 
when it was West Cambridge, Oc- 
tober 20, 1834, son of Artemus and Ruth 
(Butterfield) Locke. The Locke family is of 
English origin; and Mr. Locke traces the 
line of descent directly through Artemus, 
Josiah, Jonathan, and James, to Deacon Will- 
iam Locke, the first ancestor in America. 
Deacon William Locke, born in Stepney Par- 




JOHN G. UPTON. 



F tj B I , c 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ish, London, December 13, 1628, emigrated 
when he was six years old. He lived in the 
part of Charlestown which was later incorpo- 
rated as the town of Woburn, and became 
a prominent man. On December 27, 1655, 
he was joined in marriage with Mary Clarke; 
and of his nine children James was the eighth- 
born. James Locke married Sarah Cutter, 
and Jonathan was the youngest of his eight 
children. Jonathan Locke, great-grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, was a prosperous 
farmer and a lifelong resident of Woburn. 
He married Phebe Pierce, who bore him five 
children, of whom Josiah was the youngest. 
Jonathan Locke died January 10, 1799; and 
his wife died March 2, 1793, aged eighty 
years. Josiah Locke, grandfather of Henry 
J., resided upon a farm in Woburn, and tilled 
the soil energetically until his death, which 
occurred August 5, 1811, at the age of fifty- 
seven years. His wife, who was before mar- 
riage Elizabeth Richardson, died April 2, 
183s, aged seventy-nine. She was the mother 
of nine children, of whom Artemus was the 
fourth-born; and none are living. 

Artemus Locke, Henry J. Locke's father, 
was born at the homestead in Woburn. When 
a young man he engaged in driving a grain 
wagon from Boston to Arlington. Later he 
purchased the farm which Henry J. now occu- 
pies, and cultivated it with prosperity for the 
rest of his life. He was one of the successful 
farmers and prominent citizens of his day, 
possessing to a high degree the spirit of indus- 
try that predominated among the sturdy agri- 
culturists of the past generation. In politics 
he was a Whig. He married Ruth Butter- 
field, who was a daughter of Samuel Butter- 
field, of West Cambridge. Of their eight 
children two are living, namely: Artemus, 
who married Plenrietta Locke, and has one 
son, Henry W. ; and Henry J., the subject of 
this sketch, who is the youngest. Artemus 
Locke, Sr., died at the age of seventy-two 
years; and his wife died at sixty. They at- 
tended the Unitarian church. 

Henry Josiah Locke was reared upon the 
farm he now occupies. Since succeeding to 
its ownership, he has added adjoining land, 
having at the present time about fifty acres. 
He makes a specialty of market gardening. 



and as a producer of early vegetables is very 
successful. Politically, he is a Republican, 
and was for two years a member of the Board 
of Selectmen. On December 13, 1863, he 
married Abbie DeBlois; and his only daugh- 
ter, Emma L., is now the wife of George P. 
Sprague, of Arlington. Mrs. Locke died in 
18SS. She was a member of the Unitarian 
church. 



AMUEL SEWALL, a direct de- 
scendant of Chief Justice Samuel 
Sewall, of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, and a prosperous farmer of 
Burlington, was born in this town November 
29, 1 8 19. His father was the Rev. Samuel 
Sewall, a native of Marblehead, Mass; and 
his mother was in maidenhood Martha Mar- 
rett, daughter of the Rev. John Marrett. The 
Rev. Samuel Sewall settled at an early date 
upon one of the oldest farms in Burlington, 
where he resided for the rest of his life. He 
reared three children, namely: Samuel, the 
subject of this sketch; Martha M., widow of 
Luther P. Martin; and Abigail D., who is 
now deceased. 

Samuel Sewall attended school in Woburn, 
and also pursued a course of study at Andover 
Academy. He took up agriculture as his 
principal occupation, assisting his father until 
succeeding to the ownership of the home- 
stead, and is an able and successful farmer. 
The house in which he was born was destroyed 
by fire in April, 1897, and was a severe loss 
to the town, as it was not only a well-known 
landmark, but contained many valuable relics 
of the Revolutionary period. A new dwelling 
is now in course of erection upon the same 
site, and the plan of the old one will be pre- 
served as far as possible. In politics Mr. 
Sewall is a Democrat, and since early man- 
hood has devoted much time to public busi- 
ness. He was formerly Town Treasurer, is 
now a member of the Board of Selectmen, and 
has held the ofifice of Town Clerk for the past 
thirty-five years with the exception of one 
year. 

He married Elizabeth Brown, daughter of 
Samuel Brown, of Billerica, Mass., and has 
been the father of two children : Samuel 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Brown Sewall, who is now deceased ; and 
Martha E., widow of Thomas Curtis. She is 
a stenographer in Boston. 



§AMES H. McKENNA, Chief of Police 
of Waltham, Mass., was born in this 
city, December 14, 1846, the son of 
Patrick and Louisa (Scott) McKenna, 
and the eldest of a family of seven children. 
His father, Patrick McKenna, was born in 
Newry, County Tyrone, Ireland, and was em- 
ployed in the Dublin post-office for some 
years. He came to this country when com- 
paratively a young man, and, settling at Wal- 
tham, was employed as foreman in the Chemi- 
cal Works. He married Louisa, daughter of 
James Scott, a native of Manchester, England. 
Mr. Scott was an officer of the English army, 
and was present at the battle of Waterloo, 
where his horse was shot from beneath him. 
Patrick McKenna died January 26, 1862, and 
his wife in May, 1895, at the age of sixty-six 
years. 

James H. McKenna, the subject of this 
sketch, was educated in the public schools of 
Waltham; and at the age of thirteen years he 
began work at general farming, being em- 
ployed by S. J. Hyde. This he continued 
until his father's death in 1862. He then 
entered the Chemical Works, where he learned 
chemical plumbing, at which he worked for 
several years in different places, including 
Charleston, S.C., Wilmington, Del., Wood's 
Hole, Mass., and Baltimore, Md. In 1873 he 
returned to Waltham, and was appointed on 
the police force as patrolman, continuing in 
that position until May, 1884, when he was 
appointed Deputy Sheriff. He.still holds this 
commission, but is not active in the office. 
He received the appointment of Chief of Police 
from Mayor G. L. Mayberry in 1891, and con- 
tinues in that position at the present time. 
During these years the force has been in- 
creased and the new police station completed. 
Mr. McKenna is a member of Rumford 
Council, Royal Arcanum, No. 113; Tremont 
Lodge, No. 131 (Roxbury), Ancient Order 
United Workmen; New England Order Pro- 
tection, of Waltham ; and the Waltham Citi- 
zens' Club; and is secretary and treasurer of 



Massachusetts Chief Police Union, organized 
in 1887, his membership in the latter dating 
from 1892. 

In February, 1874, he married Mary J. 
Gorman, of Providence, R.I. They have 
seven children, as follows: Emma, Gertrude 
and T. Walter (twins), Charles, Marcella, 
James H., and Sarah. Emma, the eldest of 
the family, is employed as book-keeper at the 
office of the Elm City Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Watertown, Mass. Gertrude is also 
a book-keeper, being employed by Gately 
Brothers, of Waltham. T. Walter McKenna 
is a student at Holy Cross College, of Worces- 
ter, and is captain of the track team. Charles 
H. is also at Holy Cross College, and is 
pitcher on the base-ball team connected there- 
with. Marcella attends the Waltham High 
School. James H. is now in the North Gram- 
mar School ; and Sarah, the youngest of the 
family, is just beginning her studies. 



ALEB HARTWELL JAQUITH, 
president of the American Waltham 
Manufacturing Company, engaged 
in the manufacture of bicycles, 
senior partner of the firm of Jaquith & Co., 
Woburn, dealers in hay and grain, and half 
owner in Jaquith's Express Company, was 
born June 31, 1851, in Ashby, in the north- 
western part of Middlesex County, son of John 
Swain and Sarah B. (Maxwell) Jaquith. 

The Jaquith family is of French descent. 
The first representative in this country came 
here about 1650, and at one time resided in 
Woburn. Asa Jaquith, a farmer, son of Al- 
fred and grandfather of Caleb Hartwell, was 
born in Ashby in 1781, and died in i860. 
The maiden name of his wife was Sybil Davis. 
John Swain Jaquith, above named, son of Asa 
and Sybil, was born in Ashby in 1818. He 
was a farmer and a very prominent man in the 
community in which he lived. His death oc- 
curred in 1870. He was connected with the 
Congregational church, and during the war 
he was a member of the Board of Selectmen of 
the town. He was married in 1840 to Sarah 
B., daughter of Francis B. and Susan (Pres- 
ton) Maxwell, and was the father of the fol- 
lowing named six children: Sybil A., Sarah 




M ^STf. 




GEORGE S. SKELTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



E., Roxanna P., Caleb Hartwell, John Will- 
iam, and Mary E. Sybil, who was born in 
1S42, now resides in Fitchburg, and is the 
wife of Sullivan G. Proctor. Sarah E. , who 
was born in 1844 and died in 1882, married 
O. E. Wheeler. Roxanna P., who was born 
in 1848 and died in 1875, married for her first 
husband Isaac March, a veteran of the late 
war, and for the second Clarence Gipson. 
John William Jaquith, who was born in 1853, 
died in childhood. Mary E. , who was born 
in 1856, now resides in Fitchburg, Mass., and 
is employed as a proof-reader on the Fitch- 
burg Sentinel. 

Caleb Hartwell Jaquith was educated in the 
public schools of Ashby- and in Watatic 
Academy in that town. After his school days 
were over, he remained with his parents, 
working on the farm, until about twenty-one 
years of age. He then went to Vermont, and 
for one winter was engaged there in the lum- 
ber business. At that time his father re- 
moved to Milford, N. H. ; and he accompanied 
him, and entered the grain-mill of A. A. Gil- 
son, where he remained as a clerk for three 
years. At the end of that time Mr. Gilson 
took him into partnership, and for one year 
the firm of A. A. Gilson & Co. carried on 
a successful milling and grocery business. 
Mr. Jaquith then sold out his interest to his 
partner, and went to Ashburnham, where for 
about six months he was a member of the firm 
of Marble & Jaquith, dealers in stoves and 
tinware. Then, disposing of his interest in 
the business, Mr. Jaquith came in the spring 
of 1877 to Woburn, and here for one year 
worked in the mill of L. B. Norris as practi- 
cal miller. At the end of the year Mr. Nor- 
ris sold out to A. G. and J. A. Ham, but 
these last-named gentlemen retained the ser- 
vices of Mr. Jaquith for the next three years. 
At the end of that time he bought the express 
business then known as Davis's Express and 
now as Jaquith's Express. Mr. Jaquith man- 
aged the business until Januar}', 1896, when 
he sold out to his son, John S. Jaquith. He 
subsequently, however, bought back a half- 
interest; and this he still holds. In 18S9 he 
formed a partnership with H. C. Hall, under 
the name of Hall & Jaquith, dealers in hay 
and grain, their place of business being the 



elevator where Mr. Jaquith had formerly 
worked. In December, 1892, that firm was 
dissolved, and Mr. Jaquith formed a partner- 
ship with J. A. Ham, which continued until 
July, 1895, when Mr. Ham retired. The 
business has since been conducted under the 
name of Jaquith & Co. Mr. Jaquith is also 
extensively interested in real estate, operat- 
ing, in connection with Mr. L. W. Hall; and 
in August, 1896, he became connected with 
the American Waltham Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which manufactures bicycles. This is 
a stock company; and in September, 1896, 
Mr. Jaquith was elected its president. 

He was married on November 22, 1872, to 
Mary E. , daughter of John and Eliza A. 
(Taylor) Davis, and has three children — John 
S. , Carl Wilbur, and Claire Marie. John 
S. Jaquith, who has already been spoken of, 
was born in 1873, received his education in 
the Woburn schools, and was graduated at the 
high school in the class of 1893. Carl, who 
was born in 1879, graduated from the same in- 
stitution in 1897; and Claire, who was born 
in 1884, is now pursuing her studies at the 
high school. Mr. Jaquith is a member of the 
Congregational church. In politics he is a 
Republican. As a Mason he is connected 
with Mount Horeb Lodjre. 



/©To 



EORGE STEARNS SKELTON, who 
y|^5T was for a number of years chairman 

— of the Carlisle Board of Selectmen, 
was born September 3, 1827, in that part of 
Dunstable, Middlesex County, Mass., now 
included in the city of Nashua, N. H. His 
parents were Artemas and Mary (Hodgman) 
Skelton. Artemas Skelton, who came origi- 
nally from Bedford, Mass., was a farmer. He 
died at the age of seventy-two. His wife was 
born on the present Skelton farm. She was 
a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Green) 
Hodgman. Thomas Hodgman and his brother 
John built the house now occupied by the 
Skeltons shortly after the Revolutionary War. 
Here Mrs. Skelton lived until her marriage, 
and after her father's death she and her hus- 
band removed to her old home. She died at 
the age of seventy-two years. 

George Stearns Skelton was the only son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his parents to arrive at maturity. He was 
educated in Carlisle and Bedford. In early 
manhood he went to work on ship timber. 
When he was about forty years of age, he 
bought part of the farm owned by his parents; 
and at their death he inherited the remainder. 
He was extensively engaged in farming for a 
number of years, and he also dealt in wood 
and lumber. As a business man he was clear- 
headed, shrewd, and successful. Though a 
man of domestic taste, with no desire for 
public office, he was elected to the Board of 
Selectmen by popular vote, and served some- 
what over nine years, presiding most of the 
time as chairman. Mr. Skelton had many 
friends; and his death, which occurred March 
14, 1S85, caused by pneumonia, was univer- 
sally regretted. 

On May 25, 1870, he was married to 
Martha Jane, daughter of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth (Page) Hartwell. Mr. Hartwell was 
a native of Bedford, Mass., his wife of Car- 
lisle. Mr. and Mrs. Skelton were blessed 
with three sons — Charles Artemas, Joseph 
Hartwell, George Arthur. The eldest, who 
is twenty-seven years of age, manages the 
farm, making a specialty of raising small 
fruits. He is now on his third year as a 
Selectman of the town. He is well known in 
musical circles, playing the alto horn in the 
Bedford Cadet Band. Joseph H. Skelton was 
driving with a young gentleman named John 
Percy Wilkins on August 4, 1895; and both 
were killed at the Carlisle station on the 
Hartford & New Haven Railroad. He was 
familiar with the trains, and, knowing that 
none was due, expected to cross with safety; 
but the carriage was struck by a wild engine. 
He was twenty - three years old, and had 
worked for four years in a store in Carlisle. 
He was a member of the Order of the Golden 
Cross, to which his eldest brother also be- 
longs. George Arthur Skelton is twenty 
years of age. In his youth, like his brothers, 
he attended the Burdett Business College. 
Mrs. Skelton is refined and matronly, and a 
good business woman. She managed the farm 
for some time after her husband's death ; and, 
though she is now nominally housekeeper for 
her sons, her wise direction extends far be- 
yond the ordinary household duties. She is 



a member of the Bedford Orthodox Congrega- 
tional church, in which her husband was Dea- 
con five years. 



fOSEPH J. KELLEY is a well-known 
resident of Cambridge, having long 
taken an active part in the conduct of 
municipal affairs, and having served 
four years as a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives in the State legislature. He was 
born November 28, 1842, in County Donegal, 
Ireland. His parents came to the United 
States in 1846, landing in Boston June 17, 
and settled in Cambridge. Young Kelley was 
graduated from the grammar school when 
eleven years old, at which time he began to 
contribute to his own support. He was em- 
ployed for a year in a rope-walk and for the 
same length of time in a bolt factory. He 
subsequently worked three years in the Bay 
State and Union Glass Works, and was the 
first boy to be employed there. He then 
learned the cabinet-maker's trade with Ed- 
ward Hixon, and in 1876 engaged in business 
for himself. In 1882 he established himself 
as an undertaker at his present location, and 
has since been identified with that business. 

Politically, Mr. Kelley is a Democrat; and 
his public services have been of a character to 
make him prominent. In 1874 and 1875 he 
was in the Common Council; and during the 
years 1877, 1878, 1879, and 1883 he was a 
Representative in the State legislature. 
While a member of the House, he served 
upon the Committees on Public Charities, 
Labor, Woman Suffrage, and Railroads. In 
1885, 1886, and 1887 he was a member of the 
Board of Aldermen of Cambridge, and ren- 
dered efficient service as chairman of the Com- 
mittees on License, Police, Sewers and Drain- 
age, and Claims, and was also a member of 
the Committees on Soldiers' Aid, Water Sup- 
ply, and Legislative Matters. In 1892 he was 
nominated for Mayor upon the Citizens', or 
People's, ticket, and was again a candidate in 
1893. He has served for five years as a trus- 
tee of the Cambridge Public Library, and is at 
the present time (1898) a member of the 
School Board of Cambridge. 

Mr. Kelley and Katherine M. McGirr, a na- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tive of Secaucus, N.J., were married on July 
2, 1866. They have had five children, two of 
whom are living, namely: George H., who is 
in business with his father; and Helen F. 

Mr. Kelley is a member of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, of the Massachusetts 
Catholic Order of Foresters, being one of the 
high standing committee thereof, a member 
of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Union, the Grattan Association, the Improved 
Order of Red Men, and the Citizens' Trade 
Association of Cam-bridge. For twenty-one 
years he was a member of the St. John Liter- 
ary Institute, of which he was president four 
years. 



Wl 



OODBURY A. HAM, the Postmas- 
ter of Everett, was born in Salem, 
Mass., September 7, 1835, son of 
Elias and Jane (Abbott) Ham. His grand- 
father, William Ham, a native of the Pine 
Tree State, was a veteran of the War of 18 12. 
Elias Ham, who was born in Shapleigh, York 
County, Me., owned a farm in Danversport, 
Mass., where he and his wife died. They 
reared a family of nine children, all of whom 
are living; namely, Woodbury A., Ellen, 
Martin, Elias, William and Esther (twins), 
Albert, Jacob, and Jane. Ellen, who is the 
wife of Benjamin Getchell, resides in Swamp- 
scott, Mass. Martin, who married Miss 
Louisa Willey, lives in Somerville, Mass. 
Elias, who married Miss Martha Jones, also 
lives in Somerville. William is an officer on 
duty at Deer Island, with his home in Win- 
throp, Mass. Esther, the wife of George 
Ngwcomb, resides in Salem. Albert lives in 
Everett. Jacob, who married Miss Mary 
Day, of Danvers, Mass., resides in Woburn. 
And Jane, the wife of Augustus Davis, lives 
in Everett. 

Woodbury A. Ham was only a few months 
old when his parents left Salem for the State 
of Maine; and he was reared in the Pine Tree 
State, acquiring his education in the common 
schools and at Limerick Academy. He spent 
three years in the State of Minnesota, return- 
ing to New England when he was about 
twenty-five years old, and settling in Boston. 
He was for some time in the express business 



in Boston, and had a livery stable on Canal 
Street. About twenty-one years ago he lo- 
cated in Everett, where he soon became inter- 
ested in the affairs of the town. Since its 
incorporation he has been the vice-president of 
the Everett Savings Bank and the chairman 
of its Committee on Investments, and he has 
served on school-house building committees 
and taken an active part in other important 
matters. Pie cast his first Presidential vote 
for James Buchanan in 1856, and had been 
affiliated with the Democratic party until the 
fall of 1896, when he supported the entire Re- 
publican ticket because of his belief in sound 
money. He was the chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen for three years in succession and the 
chairman of the Board of Registrars of Voters 
from 1881 to 1892. Appointed Postmaster in 
August, 1894, he took charge about the first of 
the following September. 

Mr. Ham married Miss Caroline Ostrander. 
His only child, Carrie J., is now in her Senior 
year at Wellesley College. He belongs to 
one social body, the order of Knights of 
Honor. Both he and Mrs. Ham attend the 
Universalist church. 



7TAAPTAIN DAVID T. STRANGE, a 
I V^ retired sea captain, who is now en- 
^js^ gaged in truck farming in Stone- 
ham, was born in Taunton, Mass., 
July 27, 1847, son of Gilbert W. and Sarah 
B. (Tompkins) Strange. He is a descendant 
of Colonial ancestors who settled in South- 
eastern Massachusetts in 1650. Gilbert W. 
Strange, Captain Strange's father, was a na- 
tive of Assonet, Bristol County, Mass. He 
was extensively engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness, both in New England and North Caro- 
lina, for over forty years; and he lived to be 
ninety years old. He married Sarah B. Tomp- 
kins, of Taunton, whose father assisted in 
building the frigate "Constitution." Her 
grandfather was Lieutenant Benjamin Tomp- 
kins, who .served under King George HI. ; and 
his commission is now in the possession of 
Captain Strange. The Ton)pkins family ar- 
rived in the colony at an early date; and one 
of its male members married a daughter of 
John Alden, the Pilgrim. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



David T. Strange was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and at the age of fourteen he 
began to follow the sea. When twenty years 
old he was given the command of a vessel ; 
and during the next twelve years he was suc- 
cessfully engaged in the foreign trade, visiting 
the principal ports of the world. Retiring 
from the sea at the age of thirty-two, he set- 
tled in that part of Woburn which is now in- 
cluded within the limits of the town of Stone- 
ham, and, purchasing the John Hill farm, has 
since been engaged in its cultivation. He 
now has about twenty acres of fertile land 
devoted to market gardening. In politics he 
is a Republican, having cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for General Grant in 1872; and 
he is at the present time a member of the 
Board of Selectmen. He is connected with 
the Masonic fraternity, and is a regular at- 
tendant at the Congregational church. Cap- 
tain Strange married Abbie R. Dunbar, 
daughter of Peter Dunbar, of Taunton, and 
has five children — Louise D., Mary C, 
Marion S., Sarah J., and Helen M. 



^yDMOND C. COTTLE, one of the pros- 
r^ perous, self-made business men of VVo- 
"^^ ■■ ^ burn, was born in Tisbury, on the 
island of Martha's Vineyard, Mass., in 1842. 
His father, Edmond Cottle, born at Tisbury 
in 1804, was a descendant of an old Massa- 
chusetts family. He was a sea captain and 
later in life a farmer, dying in 1884. His 
wife, Content, daughter of Timothy and Sally 
Chase, was born in 18 19. She still survives, 
and resides at Vineyard Haven. 

The little schooling which was the portion 
of Edmond Cottle was received at the public 
schools in his native town. With a laudable 
ambition to learn a trade, at the age of six- 
teen he left his home, and, coming to Wo- 
burn in 1859, apprenticed himself to Tidd & 
Blake, tanners and curriers, for a period of 
three years. He served his time, receiving 
as compensation, besides his board, forty 
dollars for the first year, fifty dollars for the 
second, and sixty for the third. In 1862, in 
response to a call for nine months' men, he 
enlisted in Company G, Fifth Massachusetts 
Volunteers, under Captain William T. Cram- 



mer and Colonel Pierson, and at once went 
with his regiment to North Carolina. At the 
expiration of his term of enlistment he re- 
turned to Woburn to re-enter the employ of 
the firm with which he had served his appren- 
ticeship. He subsequently re-enlisted in the 
old company for one hundred days' service, 
and was again sent to the front. Upon re- 
ceiving his honorable discharge, he settled in 
Stoneham, Mass., and entered the employ of 
William Tidd & Co. After remaining with 
this firm a short time, he went to Grafton, 
Mass., and became the superintendent of a 
shop in the same line of work. It was in 
Grafton that he first established himself in 
business in company with Thomas P. Hall, 
the firm of Hall & Cottle continuing for eigh- 
teen months. Mr. Cottle then bought his 
partner's interest, and continued the business 
in his own name. While thus engaged, in 
response to a request from his first employer, 
Mr. Blake, he met him in Boston, and during 
the interview was offered a salary of three 
thousand dollars per year to return to Woburn 
and become superintendent of the Blake 
tanneries. Declining this proposition, Mr. 
Cottle was offered an interest in the concern. 
This he accepted, and the firm became Blake, 
Higbee & Co. The plant occupied by them 
was located on the site where he had served 
his apprenticeship, and where he is now doing 
business. The partnership continued seven 
years. Then Mr. Cottle withdrew; and in 
1867 he organized a new company, under the 
firm name of Cottle & Ramsdell, which was in 
existence for three years, or until, selling out 
to Mr. Ramsdell, he began business indepen- 
dently, building a new factory off John Street 
in Woburn, where he remained fifteen years. 
During this time the old firm of Blake & 
Higbee retired, and in 1890 Mr. Cottle 
bought the factory in which he had commenced 
life without a dollar. He is there doing an 
extensive business under the firm name of 
E. C. Cottle & Son, making a specialty of 
glove, grained, and split leather for shoes. He 
obtains his raw material principally from 
Southern tracts and from importations from 
Europe, also receiving bark from New Bruns- 
wick and other parts of Canada. His plant 
has a capacity of seventy-five thousand hides 




EDMOND C. COTTLE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



per year, and he here employs one hundred 
hands. He has a store at 37 High Street, 
Boston, where the output is sold, about 
seventy-five per cent, being exported to Eng- 
land and other countries, the annual business 
amounting to four -hundred thousand dollars. 
It is a fact worthy of mention that, of the 
thirty-three apprentices employed by Tidd & 
Blake in the years of his first connection with 
that firm, Mr. Cottle and two others are the 
only survivors. 

Mr. Cottle married first in 1866 Emma A., 
daughter of Martin and Pauline Howe, of 
Grafton, Mass. She died in January, 1881, 
leaving two children — Fred E. and Alice H. 
Fred E. , born in 1867, was educated in the 
Woburn schools, and is now a junior member 
of the firm. Pie married Emma A. Greenleaf, 
of Woburn. Alice H., born in 1872, married 
Walter E. Marion, and also resides in Wo- 
burn. Mr. Cottle married second in 1882 
Clara I., daughter of Charles and Mary 
Bowers, of Woburn. By this union he has 
one daughter, Agnes E., born in 1886 and 
now in school. 

Before Woburn became a city, Mr. Cottle 
served for four years as Selectman, and he is 
at present on the Board of Aldermen. He is 
also one of the trustees of the Burbeen Free 
Lecture Fund and one of the directors of the 
Woburn National Bank. He is a member of 
Mount Horeb Lodge, F. & A. M., and of the 
Woburn Post, No. 161, G. A. R. He is a 
Republican in politics, with independent pro- 
clivities, and is an attendant of the First Con- 
gregational Church. 



Y^\r\AJOR JAIV 
yit/ R LILLY, U. 
nillTl West Point 



M E S WILLIAM 
S. A., a graduate of 
)int and the Commander 
of the United States Arsenal at 
Watertown, was born in Chambersburg, 
Franklin County, Pa., August 2, 1839, son 
of Wilson and Elizabeth McCullen (Mills) 
Reilly. He is a grandson of James Reilly, 
an Irish patriot who escaped from Ireland, 
after having taken part in a rebellion during 
the latter part of the last century, and for 
whose capture a large reward was offered. 
James Reilly found a refuge in the United 



States, settling in Franklin County, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was engaged in farming, and 
also operated a flouring-mill. Possessing a 
strongly defined character, especially marked 
by a natural love for liberty, he was heartily 
welcomed by the citizens of the then new re- 
public; and as a citizen he proved himself 
worthy of the friendship accorded him. For 
many years he served as a Justice of the 
Peace, and was known throughout the county 
as Squire Reilly. He married a Miss Wil- 
son, who bore him eight children. 

Wilson Reilly, eldest son of James, was 
born in Waynesboro, Pa. He acquired his 
early education in his native town. After- 
ward he studied law in Chambersburg, where 
he followed the legal profession for the rest 
of his life, and was one of the able lawyers 
and prominent public men of Southern Penn- 
sylvania. In politics he supported the Demo- 
cratic party, and was elected to Congress dur- 
ing the administration of President Buchanan. 
He died at the age of seventy-two years. His 
wife, Elizabeth, was a native of Chambers- 
burg and a daughter of William Mills, one of 
the old-time Quakers of Pennsylvania. She 
reared eight children, of whom James Will- 
iam, Wilson Hamilton, Elizabeth Jane, Mar- 
garet, Annie A., and Lucy B. are living. 
Margaret is the wife of James P. Orr, and has 
four children ; and Lucy B. is the wife of 
James D. Wilson, of Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Wilson Reilly lived to be eighty years old. 

James William Reilly received his prelim- 
inary education at the Chambersburg Acad- 
emy. In the summer of 1859 he became a 
cadet at the United States Military Academy 
at West Point. He was graduated in 1863, 
and, receiving a First Lieutenant's commis- 
sion, was ordered to duty in the Ordnance 
Department of the United States army at the 
Arsenal in Watertown! In April, 1864, he 
was sent to the field as Inspector of Ordnance 
in the Department of Tennessee, upon the 
staff of General McPherson, and was present 
at the siege of Atlanta. When General Sher- 
man began his famous march to the sea. Lieu- 
tenant Reilly was transferred to the staff of 
General Schofield as Chief of Ordnance. He 
participated in the battles of Frankville and 
Nashville, and for gallant conduct on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



field was brevetted Captain. After the war 
he was stationed at the various arsenals 
throughout the United States, and from 1871 
to 1874 was Assistant Professor of Law at 
West Point. From 1875 to 1881 he was 
chief ordnance officer on the staff of General 
Sheridan, with headquarters at Chicago; and 
since January, 1892, he has been Commander 
at the Watertown Arsenal. His experience 
in the Ordnance Department, both in the field 
and at the various arsenals, makes him espe- 
cially valuable to the national government; 
and his efficiency as an officer is recognized 
throughout the regular army. He is a mem- 
ber of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion 
and a Royal Arch Mason. 

On November 4, 1875, Major Reilly was 
united in marriage with Helen Julia Griffin, 
of Philadelphia, a daughter of John A. Griffin. 
He has two sons: William, born in March, 
1879; and Frederick Hamilton, born in Octo- 
ber, 1881. William is studying mechanical 
engineering, and Frederick H. is preparing 
for a military career. Since coming to Water- 
town, the Major and Mrs. Reilly have ac- 
quired a large circle of friends and acquaint- 
ances. They attend the Episcopal church. 



ANIEL CHAPMAN STILLSON, 
the inventor of the celebrated Still- 
son wrench, was born March 25, 
1830, in Durham, N.H. His par- 
ents were William and Nancy (Chapman) 
Stillson. The Stillson family are of Scotch 
origin, and were among the first settlers of 
this country. The grandfather of Daniel C. 
Stillson was born in Portsmouth, N.H. He 
was a Captain in the Revolutionary War. 
William Stillson, the father of Daniel, was 
born in New Hampshire. Pie was a carpenter 
by trade. He died in Durham, N.H., in 
1843, at the age of sixty-five. There were 
twelve children in his family, of whom Daniel 
C. is the only one now living; Susan, the 
widow of the late John C. Page, of Con- 
cord, N.H., having recently passed away. 

Daniel C. Stillson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of New Market, N.H. After the 
death of his father he was employed in the 
cotton-mills of Exeter, N.H., and New 



Market. In the latter place he learned the 
machinist's trade in the shop of Benjamin 
Brooks. He was employed at his trade in 
various places for a number of years. When 
the war of the Rebellion commenced, he was 
at work in the navy-yard at Charlestown, 
Mass., in the machine shops. In 1862 the 
government, recognizing his great ability as an 
engineer, tendered him a position in the navy, 
which he accepted. Space will not admit of 
giving but a brief outline of the many stirring 
events that he took part in while at sea in 
defence of his country. He was appointed act- 
ing third assistant engineer, January 20, 1862, 
and was assigned to the steamer "R. B. 
Forbes," then at New York. She sailed on 
the 22d of February as a convoy to several 
other smaller vessels bound for New Orleans. 
Two days afterward she was wrecked on Cur- 
rituck Reef, on the coast of North Caro- 
lina, during a heavy gale that was disastrous 
to many other ships on the coast. The 
ofificers and all of the crew got on shore safely, 
and were rescued by the United States 
steamer "Young Am.erica " just in time to 
escape capture by the rebels. They were 
transferred from the "Young America" at 
Hampton Roads, Va. , to the United States 
frigate "Roanoke," Mr. Stillson being on 
board of her in the action when she engaged 
the rebel batteries at Sewell's Point, March 
8, 1862. From on board of her he witnessed 
the battle between the "Monitor" and the 
"Merrimac." Soon after he was ordered to 
the United States steamship "Somerset" at 
New York, and sailed from that port for New 
Orleans, touching at Key West for coal. The 
commodore of the fleet at that port stopped the 
ship from making its voyage to New Orleans, 
and ordered it on a cruise in search of block- 
ade runners off the coast of Cuba. It lay 
close up under Morro Castle to watch if they 
left in the night. Shortly after they capt- 
ured the blockade runners "Circassian" 
off Cuba, after which they bombarded and 
captured Cedar Keys, P"la., March 19, 1862. 
On June 16, 1862, the ship captured the earth- 
works at St. Mark's, Fla., destroying the 
light-house and many other buildings. On 
the 31st of August, the same year, Mr. Still- 
son was forced to resign on account of ill 




SAMUEL OSGOOD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



health. On August 14, 1863, having re- 
covered his health, he was appointed as acting 
second assistant engineer in the navy, and 
was ordered to duty aboard the United States 
steamer "Queen," an ordnance ship. She 
was at the taking of Fort Wagner and at 
the assault and repulse of our navy at Fort 
Sumter. The ship attacked a fort to the 
south of Brazos, Tex., but was beaten off, the 
enemy being too strong for- a ship of the class 
of the "Queen." She was at the capture of 
Fort Morgan, August 22, 1864. On the 7th 
of September, 1864, the ship was ordered 
from Pensacola, Fla., to New York, with 
many prisoners of war. Mr. Stillson was 
promoted to acting first assistant engineer No- 
vember 16, 1864. The ship returned to Port 
Royal, S.C, from whence, on January 18, 
1865, she was sent to Washington with de- 
spatches informing President Lincoln that 
General Sherman's army had reached Savan- 
nah on his "March through Georgia." She 
was at the capture of Fort Fisher, and was 
despatched to Washington with the news of 
that event. On January 25, 1865, the ship 
sailed with Admiral Farragut from Annapo- 
lis, Md., to City Point on the James River. 
This was his first voyage after his appoint- 
ment to the newly created office of Vice- 
Admiral, he being the first to receive that 
honor. Mr. Stillson was honorably discharged 
at the close of the war in 1865. 

After the war he went to work for J. J. 
Walworth & Co. at Cambridge, Mass., and 
while there he invented the wrench that has 
made his name so well known all over the me- 
chanical world, one of which was used in 
effecting the escape of Signora Cis- 
neros from her Cuban prison. He remained 
with this firm for several years, being foreman 
of one of the departments. He is now retired 
from active business, having his home in 
Somerville, Mass., with the business and so- 
cial interests of which city he has been 
closely identified. In 1884 he was in the 
Common Council, and subsequently served 
two years on the Board of Aldermen. He 
was afterward elected as one of the Board of 
Overseers of the Poor, where he served sev- 
eral years. Mr. Stillson married Ellen R., 
daughter of Clement M. Davis, of Durham, 



N.H., and two children have been born to 
him, both of whom are living: Helen Etta, the 
wife of F. A. Preble; and Cora Josephine, the 
wife of O. B. Winn. Mr. Stillson is a mem- 
ber of Granite Lodge of F. & A. M. of Salmon 
Falls, N.H.; was exalted to the R. A. de- 
gree in Masonry in Shekinah Chapter, Chel- 
sea; is a charter member of Orient Council, 
Somerville, Mass. ; is a charter member of 
Coeur de Lion Commandery K. T., of Charles- 
town, Mass.; and is a thirty-second degree 
Mason. He is also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Winter Hill Social Club, and 
a comrade in Willard C. Kinsley Post, 
G. A. R., of Somerville. 



;e)^AMUEL OSGOOD, of Billerica, 
the se.xton of the North Billerica 
cemetery for over thirty years, was 
born in Nelson, Cheshire County, 
N. H., March 4, 1S25, son of Joseph and Polly 
(Jewett) Osgood. The Osgood family has 
been settled in this country since 1633, when 
the three brothers, Christopher, John, and 
William Osgood, located here. Christopher, 
born in Andover in 1675, who was the grand- 
son of the first Christopher, in 1708 received a 
water grant at North Billerica; and there he 
built a grist-mill, being the first person to 
avail of the valuable water-power now so ex- 
tensively utilized. Samuel Osgood, who died 
in Burlington, Mass., some years ago, was the 
last descendant of the first Christopher. The 
subject of this sketch is descended from one of 
the other brothers, probably William. 

Samuel Osgood left New Hampshire in 
1847, and went to Billerica. When he was 
twenty-one years old he obtained work as a 
teamster in Boston, and subsequently he 
worked for a milkman in Lexington, Mass. 
He fell in love with a lady whomhe met in 
Lincoln, Mass., and, desiring to remain in the 
vicinity of her home, he hired out to Deacon 
Amos and Benjamin Spalding in Billerica. 
On New Year's Day, 185 1, he was united to 
the lady of his choice, Miss Lydia Maria 
Giles, daughter of Daniel L. Giles, of Lin- 
coln, and rented a farm near his present home. 
Three years after his marriage he obtained 
work in a freight house in Boston, where he 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was employed three years. During the five 
years following he had charge of a farm in 
Chelmsford, after which, in 1S62, he bought 
his present home. On October 18 of that 
year he bade good-by to his family and 
friends, enlisting in Company G, Forty- 
seventh Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry. 
The regiment was incorporated with General 
Banks's command, stationed at New Orleans; 
and Mr. Osgood was on guard duty most of 
the time about the city. For two months he 
was on guard at the St. James Hotel, then 
used as a hospital. 

After he was discharged from the army, in 
August, 1863, Mr. Osgood returned home, 
and since that time has given his attention to 
the management of his farm and to the duties 
devolving upon him as sexton of the cemetery. 
His homestead is the old Colonel Josiah Rich- 
ardson farm, situated about one mile north of 
the Centre. The house in which he lives was 
built by a Richardson over one hundred years 
ago. Mrs. Osgood died November 3, 1894. 
They had one son, Charles Francis, who lived 
but six years and four months. Mr. Osgood's 
sister, Mrs. Sarah A. Frost, the wife of Jo- 
seph P. Frost, of Jeffries, N.H., is his house- 
keeper. A Republican in politics, he has 
held a number of minor offices. He is a mem- 
ber of Ladd & Whitney Post, G. A. R., of 
Lowell. One of the oldest residents of the 
town, he has many friends in Billerica and 
Lowell and the respect of all who know him. 



/pTEORGE FREMONT BEAN, an ex- 
V |l5 I Mayor of Woburn, was born in Brad- 
^— ^ ford, N.H., March 24, 1857, son of 
Stephen Sibley and Nancy E. (Colby) Bean. 
His great-grandfather, Nathaniel Bean, who 
resided in New Hampshire, received his com- 
mission as a Justice of the Peace from Gov- 
ernor Wentworth, and acted in that capacity 
for many years. Daniel Bean, the grand- 
father, was a lifelong resident of New Hamp- 
shire. His active years were devoted to till- 
ing the soil and to operating a saw and 
grist mill owned by him. By his second wife, 
whose maiden name was Nancy Sibley, there 
were three children, namely: Stephen Sibley, 
above mentioned; Dolphus S. , a prosperous 



farmer of 'Warner, N. H. ; and Nancy A., who 
married N. G. Ordway. N. G. Ordway was 
for twelve years sergeant-at-arms in the 
House of Representatives, and received from 
President Hayes the appointment of Governor 
of Dakota. He is now residing in Warner, 
N.PI. 

Stephen Sibley Bean, George F. Bean's 
father, was born in Warner, October 20, 1820. 
For some years he was engaged in teaching 
school ; and later he held a position in the 
Treasury Department at Washington, D. C. 
He was a ripe scholar and an able politician. 
In religious belief he was a Presbyterian, and 
he acted as Deacon of the First Presbyterian 
Church in Washington. His wife, Nancy E., 
whom he married in 1845, was a daughter of 
Philip and Sarah Colby. She became the 
mother of two children : Emma Belle, who 
died in infancy; and George F. , the subject 
of this sketch. Stephen Sibley Bean died 
December 17, 1885; and his wife died April 
6, 1886, aged sixty-two years. 

George Fremont Bean prepared for college 
at Colby Academy, New London, N. H., and 
was graduated from Brown University in 1881, 
standing second in his class. Subsequently 
he was principal of a school in Woburn for 
a year. After studying law with the Hon. 
Samuel C. Eastman, of Concord, N. H., for the 
same length of time, he entered the Boston 
University Law School, from which he was 
graduated in 1885. He was immediately ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk County bar, and entered 
upon the practice of his profession in Boston, 
giving his principal attention to commercial 
law. Mr. Bean has resided permanently in 
Woburn since 18S6, and his ability and inter- 
est in political affairs have made him especially 
eligible to the public service. As the second 
Mayor of Woburn, to which ofifice he was 
elected in 1890, he gave the city an able, pro- 
gressive, and business-like administration. 
He was a member of the Executive Committee 
appointed to arrange for the observation of the 
two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the 
settlement of Woburn, in 1892, and the chair- 
man of the Committee of Invitations. Val- 
uable public service was rendered by him as 
chairman of the non-partisan committee of 
thirty-two chosen for the purpose of adopting 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a new city charter; and in tlie capacity of 
member of the subcommittee that drafted 
the document he presented it to the legisla- 
tive Committee on Cities, whose favorable 
report caused its passage without amendments. 
He was also associated with Judge Johnson 
and E. H. Lounsbury in revising the city 
ordinances, serving as clerk of that committee. 
In 1895 he was elected to the School Board, 
of which he is still a member. 

On September 2, 1886, Mr. Bean was 
united in marriage with E. Maria Blodgett, 
daughter of William A. and Anna M. (Tag- 
gard) Blodgett. She graduated from Welles- 
ley College in 1881, and for five years taught 
English literature and French in the Woburn 
High School. Mrs. Bean is the mother of 
three children: Esther, born June 14, 1S87; 
Stephen Sibley, born June 17, 1891 ; and 
Philip Colby, born in 1S97, who died in in- 
fancy. 



ILLIAM F. BERRY, of Winches- 
ter, the second vice-president of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad Company, 
was born in Biddeford, Me., February 2, 
1844, son of William and Olivia Gould (Dud- 
ley) Berry. On the mother's side he is a 
descendant of Thomas Dudley, of Northamp- 
tonshire, England, who was Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Colony several times under the 
first charter. The Rev. Samuel Dudley, son 
of Thomas, born in England about the year 
1610, in 1632 wedded Mary, daughter of Gov- 
ernor Winthrop. After her death in Salis- 
bury, Mass., April 16, 1643, he contracted a 
secorv:! marriage with Mary Byley ; and he had 
a third wife, whose Christian name was Eliza- 
beth. He was the father of eighteen chil- 
dren. Stephen Dudley, the next in line, who 
was born in Exeter, N. H., married Sarah 
Gilman. His son, Nicholas Dudley, born in 
Brentwood, N. H., August 27, 1694, married 
Elizabeth Gordon. Their son, Joseph Dud- 
ley, who was born in Brentwood in 1728, 
married Hannah, daughter of Ephraim Leav- 
itt, of Stratham, N.H. 

Trueworthy Dudley, the sixth in line from 
Governor Thomas Dudley, and the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, set- 



tled in Waterboro, Me., where his children 
were reared. He served as a soldier in the 
struggle for independence and in the War of 
1 8 12, and he died from wounds received in 
the battle of Plattsburg. Benjamin F. Dud- 
ley, William F. Berry's grandfather, born in 
1792, was a merchant and a Justice of the 
Peace in Kennebunkport, Me., and repre- 
sented his district in the legislature. On 
August 30, 1S17, he married Clarissa Libby, 
of Scarboro, Me., who died August 31, 1831. 
Hannah Locke became his second wife on 
June 22, 1832. His daughter, Olivia Gould 
Dudley, born in Lyman, December 24, 1819, 
of his first union, married William ]5erry, and 
had eight children, of whom two sons and two 
daughters are now living. The father, after 
leaving school, studied law, and was admitted 
to the bar. After following the legal profes- 
sion for some time, he became a merchant, 
and was subsequently a director of the F"irst 
National Bank of Biddeford. At first a Whig 
in politics, he subseciuently became a Repub- 
lican ; and he served the public in the capacity 
of Judge of the Municipal Court of York 
County, Maine, for twelve years, and of leg- 
islative Representative for two terms. 

William F. Berry, who was the third child 
of his parents, attended the graded schools and 
high schools of Biddeford. Having entered 
the service of the Boston & Maine Railroad 
Company in his boyhood, he has worked his 
way forward through the various positions in 
the freight and passenger departments to those 
of general traffic manager and vice-president, 
which he so efficiently fills at present. Mr. 
Berry was a charter member of the first lodge 
of Knights of Pythias in Maine, and instituted 
the second lodge in that .State. He has with- 
drawn from connection with this and all other 
secret orders except the Masonic fraternity, 
with which he maintains relation by member- 
ship in Mount Tabor Lodge, the Chapter in 
East Boston, and Boston Commandery of 
Knights Templar. He is also a member of 
the Suffolk, Athletic, and Pine Tree Clubs of 
Boston, and of the Calumet Club of Winches- 
ter. Li January, 1869, he was united in mar- 
riage with Belinda Tarbox, daughter of George 
and Belinda Tarbox, of Kennebunk, Me. He 
has two children — William P. and Grace. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William P., who resides in Winchester, mar- 
ried Augusta, daughter of L. W. Kimball, of 
Winchester, Mass., and has one child — Mar- 
shall K. Grace is the wife of Frank P. 
Aborne, a shoe manufacturer of Lynn, Mass. 



'IMON H. BARRETT, who was 
formerly connected with a well- 
known dyeing establishment, and is 
now living in retirement in Maiden, 
was born here February g, 1811, son of Will- 
iam and Mary (Hall) Barrett. He is a de- 
scendant of Humphrey Barrett, who was a 
passenger on one of the trips of the " May- 
flower " to this country. His grandfather re- 
sided in Concord, and was Captain of an ar- 
tillery company in the Colonial militia. 

William Barrett, Simon Barrett's father 
and the founder of the dyeing establishment 
that bears his name, settled in Maiden in 
1S03, when Everett and Melrose were included 
within its limits. He began the dyeing 
business in 1803. After the original building 
was destroyed by fire, he erected a brick 
structure one hundred and seventy-five feet in 
length. In his time he employed forty-eight 
men and twenty-five girls, all of whom he 
boarded. In 1831 he was succeeded by his 
sons. He died in 1833, aged fifty-nine years, 
leaving considerable real estate, which for- 
merly included the site of the Baptist church. 
His wife, Mary, who was a daughter of Moses 
Hall, of Charlestown, became the mother of 
ten children — William, Henry, Caroline, 
Simon H., Augustus, Aaron, Mary, Louisa, 
Elizabeth, and Augusta. Of these the only 
survivors are Simon H. and Augusta. . 

Simon H. Barrett was educated in the dis- 
trict schools; and, when his studies were com- 
pleted, he began work in the dye-house. 
After his father's death he succeeded to the 
business, in company with his brothers. He 
was actively connected with the enterprise 
until 1840, when failing health caused him to 
retire. As a means of recuperating his 
health he engaged in outdoor exercise, prin- 
cipally gunning. For sixty-five years he 
has made annual visits to Cape Cod in the 
duck-shooting season, and also yearly trips to 
Wisconsin, where he still has boats and 



decoys located in different places. The shoot- 
ing of canvas-back ducks has been the means 
of affording him considerable profit as well 
as pleasure. At Koshkonong, Wis., in one 
week of 1888, he bagged three hundred and 
eighteen of these fowl, which he disposed of 
at one dollar each. 

In 1834 Mr. Barrett was united in marriage 
with Mary A. Pratt. Of the five children 
born to them, three died in infancy. The 
survivors are: William H., the manager of 
the Maiden Opera House; and Ellen A., who 
married David Jackson, and has an only son, 
Harry B. , now employed by R. Hollings & 
Co., Boston. Mr. Barrett cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for Andrew Jackson in 1832. 
He has been a Republican since the formation 
of the party. 



WILLIAM R. PUTNAM, a 
manufacturer and an extens 
estate owner of Woburn, is 



retired 
ive real 
a native 

of Lyndeboro, N. H., and was born in' 1821. 
His parents were Israel and Ruth (Sargent) 
Putnam, both natives of Lyndeboro; and his 
ancestors on both sides took part in the strug- 
gle for independence. The first ancestor of 
the Putnam family in this country was John 
Putnam, who emigrated from England with 
his three sons, and settled in Danvers, Mass., 
in 1630. In 1738 Ephraim Putnam, a de- 
scendant of John, settled in Lyndeboro, and, 
with his son Ephraim, served in the expedition 
against Canada, joined the Continental army, 
and participated in the capture of Ticonderoga. 
Daniel Putnam, the grandfather of William 
R., was a native and a prominent resident of 
Lyndeboro, representing his district in the 
legislature for twelve years, and acting as 
a Justice of the Peace. He married Plannah 
Johnson, whose father enrolled himself among 
the patriots in 1775 and was present at the 
battle of Bunker Hill. Israel Putnam, son of 
Daniel, was born in 1795. For many years 
he was a carpenter and builder, and was for 
several terms in succession chosen a Repre- 
sentative to the legislature. He died in 
1869. His wife, Ruth, was a daughter of 
Joshua and Abigail (Ladd) Sargent, the 
former of whom enlisted twice, and served, in 




JOSEPH N. BACON. 




SIMON H. BARRETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



all, two years in the Revolutionary War. She 
became the nrother of six children, of whom 
there are living: William R., the subject of 
this sketch; Daniel, now a teacher in the 
Normal School at Ypsilanti, Mich. ; Israel, 
a prosperous farmer of Milford, N. H. ; and 
Hannah, who married Kneland Lewis, and is 
now residing with her daughter, Mrs. Gard- 
ner, in Lowell. 

William R. Putnam was educated- in his 
native town, and remained at home until 
twenty-one years old. He then came to 
Woburn, was there employed for two years by 
Mr. Chaffee in the manufacture of patent 
leather, and subsecjuently followed the same 
occupation in Newark, N.J., for three years. 
Then, returning to Woburn, he engaged in 
business as a member of the firm of S. O. 
Pollard & Co., which may be said to have 
developed the patent leather industry in this 
locality. He retained his connection with 
that concern until 1877, since which time he 
has given his entire attention to his real 
estate business. 

Mr. Putnam has been a Republican since 
the formation of the party, voting for John C. 
Fremont, and aiding with his influence and 
ballot in forwarding Republican interests. 
He served with ability as a Selectman, was 
on the Board of Assessors in 1874 and 1875, 
and for ten years was superintendent of the 
cemetery. In 1851 he was joined in marriage 
with Martha J. Hartshorn, of Mason, N. H. 
Mrs. Putnam has had two children, namely: 
Emma A., born in 1852, who married Dr. 
Seth W. Kelley, of Woburn, and died in 1890, 
leaving one daughter — Christine Putnam 
Kelley; and William S. , who died in infancy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Putnam attend the Congrega- 
tional church. 



"ENRY N. FISHER, a substantial 
business man of Waltham, was born 
in Barton, Vt. , June 5, 1842, where 
his father was in business for sev- 
eral years. The latter died in 1846 at 
Nashua, N. H., leaving two sons and a daugh- 
ter. Henry N., the youngest of the family, 
was educated in Nashua. Illness prevented 
his finishing the course at the high school. 



and he entered a grocery store as clerk. After 
remaining here for three years, he removed to 
Waltham in 1859, and there obtained employ- 
ment in the factory of the American Watch 
Company. In August, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company D, Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, which became a part of the Ninth Army 
Corps, under General McClellan, in the Army 
of the Potomac. He was in battle on Septem- 
ber 14, 1862, and at Antietam three days 
later, where he received a shell wound in his 
right shoulder. This injury disabled him for 
further service, and caused his honorable dis- 
charge March 4, 1863. Returning home, he 
re-entered the service of the Watch Company, 
which, however, he subsequently left to be- 
come the president and treasurer of the New 
England North-western Insurance Company. 
He is vice-president of the Waltham Savings 
Bank, a director of the Waltham National 
Bank, and the president of the American 
Watch Tool Company. 

Mr. Fisher is a Republican. He was the 
president of the Board of Aldermen for two 
consecutive years and Mayor of the city for 
four successive years. During his Mayoralty 
many fine buildings were erected. He is a 
member of the Isaac Parker Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of Waltham Chapter, R. A. M., of 
De Molay Commandery, K. T., of the Mas- 
sachusetts Consistory (thirty-second degree), 
being P. M. of the Lodge, H. P. of the Chap- 
ter, and Commander-in-chief of the Consis- 
tory. He is Past Commander of F. H. Rog- 
ers Post, No. 29, G. A. R., of Waltham, and 
a member of the Mayors' Club, of which as- 
sociation he has been president for two years. 



-OSEPH NEWMAN BACON, for many 
years one of the foremost citizens of 
Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., was 
born in West Newton, January 25, 
[3, and died at his home in Newton, June 
1896. 

The branch of the Bacon family from which 
he was descended was first represented in 
America by Captain Michael Bacon, who came 
from Ireland with his wife, Mary, and four 
children in 1630. He settled first at Mount 
Auburn, but later removed to Dedham, Mass.; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



where his death occurred in 1648. His son 
Michael, who died in 1688, left six children, 
the eldest being named Michael. This grand- 
son of the immigrant was born in 1639. He 
married Sarah Richardson in 1660, and died 
in 1707, after having served as a Captain of 
militia through King Philip's War. His son 
Benjamin, born in 1683, married Abigail 
Taylor, and died in 1727. Samuel Bacon, 
the next in line of descent, was born in 1721. 
He married Eunice Bacon, and died in 1786. 
His son Joseph, who served in the Revolution- 
ary War, was born in Lincoln, Mass., in 1756. 
He married Martha Bent, and died in 1788. 
Joseph, the second of the name, son of Joseph 
and Martha, was born in Lincoln in 1782, 
and died in Newton, Mass., in 1854. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Beulah Crafts 
Fuller, was a native of Charlestown, N.H. 
She bore him ten children. Of this family 
Benjamin Franklin Bacon, a brief sketch of 
whom may be found on another page of this 
volume, is the sole survivor. 

Joseph Newman Bacon was the eldest son of 
Joseph and Beulah. He attended the common 
schools of Newton in his earliest years, after 
which he pursued his studies at Marshall O. 
Rice's Academy, and completed his educa- 
tion at Phillips Academy in Andover. At the 
age of fifteen he became a clerk in his father's 
general store, then occupying the site of the 
present new bank building. On reaching his 
majority he purchased his father's interest in 
the business, which he conducted successfully 
alone for a number of years. In 1847 he sold 
out to his brother, George W. Bacon, and 
turned his attention to the development and 
improvement of real estate in this vicinity, 
becoming one of the largest dealers in realty 
in the town. He was also engaged in the in- 
surance business. In 1850 he was appointed 
a director of the Newton Bank, and in 1857 
was elected its president, a position that he 
filled to the time of his death in 1896. Fie 
was one of the organizers of the Newton and 
Watertown Gas Light Company, and was its 
president until his death. He was also one of 
the founders of the Newton Savings Bank, of 
which he was a trustee from 1877. For sev- 
eral years he was likewise a director in the 
Citizens' Mutual Insurance Company of Bos- 



ton. He built many residences of this city, 
also the Eliot and Bacon Blocks, the principal 
buildings in Newton. He was largely instru- 
mental in having the new Eliot Congregational 
Church erected, and served as one of the Build- 
ing Committee. In 1840 he was appointed 
Postmaster of Newton, and he served nine 
years in that capacity. In politics he was first 
a Whig, later a Free Soijer, and from the for- 
mation of the Republican party until his de- 
cease he was one of its firmest adherents. Fie 
was an active member of the Eliot Congrega- 
tional Church, and the last few years of his 
life its senior Deacon. 

On April 17, 1845, Mr. Bacon married 
Sarah Anna Woodward, a daughter of Elijah 
Woodward, and a descendant in the sixth gen- 
eration of John Woodward, who emigrated 
from England to Massachusetts in 1634. The 
old Woodward homestead dwelling was built 
at Newton Highlands in 168 1, and has since 
been in possession of the family, being now 
occupied by a descendant of the eighth genera- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Bacon became the parents 
of four children, two of whom died in infancy. 
The survivors are Sarah Emma and William 
Francis. Sarah Emma, born in 1854, was ed- 
ucated in the public schools of Newton, in- 
cluding the high school, and is now the wife 
of Louis C. Stanton, of this city. William 
Francis, born in 1863, obtained his prepara- 
tory education in the Newton schools, and re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts at Har- 
vard University in 1885. Entering the Har- 
vard Law School in 1886, he was graduated 
from that institution in 1889, having been ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk County bar in 1888. 
He has a fine general practice in Boston, his 
office being at 113 Devonshire Street. In 
1 89 1 he married Bessie E., daughter of Sam- 
uel M. Sayford, of Newton. They have two 
children: Frederick S., born in 1893; and 
Margaret, born in 1894. He continues his 
residence in Newton. 



ALTER SMITH LEWIS, the pro- 
prietor of the Hillside Farm in 
Stow, was born in Sterling, Mass., 
December 8, 1852, son of Thomas and Susan 
(Hapgood) Lewis. Thomas Lewis, a native 




WALTER S. LEWIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Shiitesbury, Mass., was engaged for a num- 
ber of years in manufacturing chairs at Ster- 
ling. His wife, Susan Lewis, was a native of 
Marlboro, Mass. Both have been dead for 
some time. 

Walter Smith Lewis was reared on a farm, 
and educated in the schools near his home. 
When he was seventeen years old he bought 
his time for one hundred dollars, and before he 
was twenty-one he had cancelled the debt. He 
worked for five years on the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad at South Framing- 
ham and Marlboro, and managed to save a few 
hundred dollars. In 1876 he moved to his 
present farm. Containing about fifteen acres, 
the place is an old landmark, and was origi- 
nally owned by the Wetherbee family and 
later by Nathan Whitman. Mr. Lewis made 
but a small payment on this farm when he 
bought it, but by industry and good manage- 
ment he contrived to pay the entire price in 
a few years. He at once engaged in dairying 
and raising potatoes, and was very successful. 
He retails the potatoes, of which in some 
years he raises fully twenty-seven acres. He 
keeps seventeen head of cattle, and he has a 
milk route in Hudson which brings him a 
good income. 

On January i, 1873, Mr. Lewis was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary C. Parks, sister of Lewis 
Parks, of this town, born in Stow, July 2, 
1847. Their union has been blessed by the 
following children: Lillian May, who taught 
school for two or three years in this vicinity, 
and married Samuel Peck, a member of the 
Stow Board of Selectmen ; Marshal and Caro- 
line G., graduates of the Stow High School; 
Abbie S. and Lena B. , now in the high 
school; and Herbert W. and Jessie M. Mr. 
Lewis has attended a number of Republican 
conventions, and served on the Republican 
Town Committee. For a number of years he 
was Overseer of the Poor. He was on the 
Board of Selectmen three years, and was for 
two years the business chairman of that body. 
He and his wife and their older children are 
members of the Stow Grange, of which he 
was Master for a number of years. Mrs. 
Lewis is a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church at Gleasondale, and Mr. Lewis 
attends religious services there. 



,ATRICK MAHAN, the Postmaster 
at Natick, Mass., and a veteran of 
the Civil War, has been associated 
with important interests of the town 
for many years. Born March 15, 1840, in 
County Galway, Ireland, he emigrated to 
America when a lad of twelve years. Here 
he learned the trade of a shoemaker while still 
young. He was subsecpiently engaged in the 
shoe business as his principal occupation until 
about six years ago, when he gave it up in 
order to attend to his other interests. 

Prompted by sincere loyalty to the country of 
his adoption, Mr. Mahan, in April, 1864, en- 
listed as a private in the Second Massachusetts 
Cavalry. Subsequently for brave conduct he 
was promoted to the rank of Corporal. With 
his comrades he served at first in Washington. 
He was afterward in the valley of the Shenan- 
doah under Sheridan. Later he took part in 
the engagements at Hawksville, Poolesville, 
and in other skirmishes. In the battle of 
Winchester he was wounded by a bullet in the 
shoulder, captured, and sent to the prison at 
Lynchburg, and thence to Danville. After- 
ward he was transferred to Pemberton Prison, 
Richmond, where he was confined until his ex- 
change on February 22, 1865. Honorably 
discharged in the following August, he re- 
turned to Natick and resumed his former em- 
ployment. 

A stanch Democrat in politics, Mr. Mahan 
has rendered faithful public service in sundry 
town offices. He was engineer of the fire de- 
partment for some time; a member of the Con- 
struction Committee on Sewerage for seven 
years; an Overseer of the Poor for six years; 
and in 1894 he was elected to the State 
legislature, where he was on the Committee on 
Water Supplies. Since 1868 he has been a 
member of General Wadsworth Post, G. A. R., 
and he is a charter member of the Fair Oaks 
Commandery, U. V. U. Appointed Postmas- 
ter of Natick by President Cleveland in Au- 
gust, 1894, he has since discharged the^, re- 
sponsible duties of that office to the satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. 

On November 14, 1867, Mr. Mahan was 
united in marriage with Miss Julia K. Kelli- 
her, of Millstreet, County Cork, Ireland. Of 
their thirteen children, Nellie N. graduated 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



from the Natick High School; Katherine L., 
also a graduate of the Natick High School, is 
a clerk in the post-ofifice ; Patrick A., the As- 
sistant Postmaster, who likewise graduated 
from the high school, is now a member of 
the Boston University Law School; William 
A. is a student at the Boston Dental College; 
Mary E. is a graduate of the State Normal 
School at Framingham, and is teaching in Na- 
tick; Julia A., also a graduate of the Normal 
School, is a teacher in the Chicopee schools; 
Agnes M. is another graduate of the high 
school ; and Sarah M. and Joseph A. are still 
pupils of that institution. Charles J., Henry, 
Margaret Una, and Edward complete the fam- 
ily circle. 



"ON. PARKER LINDALL CON- 
VERSE, of Woburn, formerly Judge 
of the Fourth District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex, was born in this 
town, February 14, 1822. He is a descendant 
of Allen Converse, who was a resident of 
Woburn as early as 1645, and whose name 
appears in the first volume of the town records 
as a holder of public offices. 

Allen Converse and his wife, Elizabeth 
Converse, were teachers, probably the first 
regular instructors in the town. He died of 
small-pox April ig, 1679; and she died 
August 9, 1691. Samuel Converse, son of 
Allen, was born in Woburn, September 20, 
1653, and died in 1699. He was a volunteer 
in Phipps's expedition against Quebec in 1690. 
The paternal grandparents of Judge Converse 
were Josiah and Sarah (Evans) Converse, resi- 
dents of this town ; and his parents were 
Luther and Polly E. (Parker) Converse, who 
were married in 'Woburn, January 7, 18 10. 
His maternal grandfatber was Ichabod Parker, 
of Woburn. 

Parker Lindall Converse began his general 
education in the public schools, and completed 
it with a full course at the Warren Academy, 
Woburn. He then applied himself to the 
study of music; but, after attaining a good 
degree of proficiency in the theory and prac- 
tice, he decided to enter the legal profession, 
and in 1852 he became a student in the law 
office of Nelson & Converse. He pursued the 



customary three years' course; and after the 
appointment of Mr. Nelson as Chief Justice 
of the Suffolk Superior Court he entered into 
partnership with Joshua P. Converse, and was 
associated with that gentleman until his de- 
cease. In 1858 he received from Governor 
Banks the appointment of Trial Justice, which 
he held for twenty-four years in succession. 
His original commission as a Justice of the 
Peace antedates that of any other justice in 
this city. In 1882 he was appointed Justice 
of the Fourth District Court of Eastern Mid- 
dlesex, which was established that year; and 
he continued as such until 1891, when he 
resigned. 

For the past forty years Judge Converse 
has attended to a great deal of probate busi- 
ness; and he has also devoted considerable 
time to literary pursuits, having contributed 
much interesting matter to newspapers and 
other periodicals, besides publishing a number 
of volumes, among them " Legends of Wo- 
burn," First and Second Series, and the 
"Story of Creation. " In company with John 
Johnson, Esq., and Hon. Edward D. Hayden, 
he was appointed executor of the will of the 
late Charles B. Winn; and it was under the 
supervision of these gentlemen that the Winn. 
Library Building was erected in accordance 
with the desire of the testator. Judge Con- 
verse was the first clerk and treasurer of the 
Woburn Gas Light Company, of which he was 
one of the projectors and for many years a 
director; and he is the only survivor of the 
original eleven who incorporated the Woburn 
P""ive Cent Savings Bank, of which he is now 
first vice-president and a member of the 
Investment Committee. Having made a spe- 
cialty of probate practice for many years, he 
has travelled quite extensively, both in Eu- 
rope and America in connection with his 
business, never meeting with any accident by 
sea or land, his health remaining unimpaired 
by change of climate and unfamiliar surround- 
ings. He has made frequent visits to Canada 
and the Western States, including the Pacific 
Coast, and upon one occasion visited the 
Buffalo ranges with " Ben " Halliday, origina- 
tor of the United States Pony Express and the 
famous Deadwood Coach. He has never suf- 
fered from an illness of any kind, and has 




PARKER L. CONVERSE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tasted no medicine since his infancy. Since 
qualified to exercise the right of suffrage, he 
has earnestly supported the Democratic party. 
He was at one time a member of the IBoard 
of Selectmen, served four terms upon the 
School Committee, was chairman of the Dem- 
ocratic Town Committee- twenty years, and for 
thirty years has been one of the Cemetery 
Commissioners. In his religious views he is 
a Unitarian. 

In 1854 Judge Converse married for his first 
wife Betsey D. Horton, daughter of Captain 
Sparrow Horton, a ship-master of Cape Cod. 
She died in 1870, leaving one daughter — 
Mary D., who was born in 1862, educated in 
the Woburn High School and at the Normal 
Art School in Boston, and is now the wife of 
Edwin B. Blanchard, of this city. In 1872 
Judge Converse married Lucy E. Buffum, 
daughter of Edward Buffum, of Salem, Mass., 
and a descendant of one of the old Quaker 
families of that city. 



-OSEPH ORLIN HAYDEN, the Treas- 
urer of Middlesex County and the pro- 
prietor of the SomerviWe /onr/ia/, was 
born in Blandford, Hampden County, 
July 8, 1847, son of Elizur and Lu- 
E. (Simons) Hayden. The Haydens 
have lived in Blandford and Haydenville for 
more than a century. Mr. Hayden's grand- 
father, Elias Hayden, who was a native of 
Blandford, married Miss Sarah Boise. Elizur 
Hayden was born and reared in Blandford. In 
his early manhood he taught school, and his 
later years were spent on a farm in Granville, 
Mass. His wife, a native of Eastern New 
York, bore him six children, of whom Sydney 
E., Sarah, William D., Jennie, and Joseph 
Orlin attained maturity. Sarah became the 
wife of Louis L. Osborn. Jennie married the 
Rev. Russell H. Conwell, now of Philadel- 
phia, and died some time ago, leaving a son 
and a daughter. 

Joseph Orlin Hayden spent his boyhood in 
Granville, Mass., attending the public schools 
there and subsequently the high school in 
Chicopee Falls. When he was seventeen 
years old, he found employment as clerk with 
his brother-in-law, Russell H. Conwell, who 



was then practising law and conducting a real 
estate and insurance business in Minneapolis, 
Minn. After spending three years in the 
West, he returned East, and has since resided 
in Somerville, Mass. Here he was at first 
engaged in wholesale haberdashery business. 
Then he went on the Boston Tii/ies as cashier. 
Afterward he became the treasurer of the 
Times Publishing Company. He had been 
with the publishing company since 1869, 
when in 1876 he bought the Somerville 
Journal, with which he has now been identified 
for over twenty years as owner and manager. 
No New England newspaper is so well known 
throughout the country. Under the wise man- 
agement of Mr. Hayden its name has become 
a synonym for wit and brilliancy, and its pub- 
lication a financial and journalistic success. 
The plant is kept abreast with the times, and 
all the newest inventions are to be found in its 
workrooms. One of the original incorporators 
of the Somerville Savings Bank, Mr. Hayden 
has been on its Board .of Trustees since its 
organization. He is the president of the 
Somerville National Bank, and he is also a 
trustee of the Somerville Hospital. 

On August 8, 1870, Mr. Hayden was mar- 
ried to Mary Elizabeth Pond, who was born in 
Somerville, daughter of William and Mary 
(Cleves) Pond, both of whom were natives of 
Devonshire, England. In 18S3 Mr. Hayden 
was placed by the- City Council on the Water 
Board, and in 1884 he became the president of 
that body. In 1885 he was elected by the Re- 
publicans to the office of Treasurer of Middle- 
sex County, and he has since been re-elected 
for four successive terms. He is now serving 
his twelfth year in the office. Mr. Hayden 
is also an ex-president of the Suburban Press 
Association of New England, which enrolls 
one hundred and eighty newspapers. 



tUFUS HARTWELL BRIGHAM, of 
the firm of F. Brigham & Co., shoe 
manufacturers, Hudson, Mass., was 
born in Hudson, June 9, 1837, son 
of Francis and Sophia (Gleason) Brigham. 
The Brigham family has long been one of 
prominence in Hudson, its members having 
been closely connected with the industrial 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



growth and prosperity of the town, especially 
in starting and developing the shoe manufact- 
uring business, the foundation of its present 
prosperity. 

The family is descended from Thomas 
Brighara, who came over from England in 
1635, and ultimately settled in Watertown. 
He married Mercy Hurd, who was born in 
England, and who was three times married, 
twice after the death of Mr. Brigham. She 
died in 1693, having survived her first hus- 
band for nearly forty years. 

Samuel, son of Thomas and Mercy Brigham, 
was born in 1652, and died in 1713. His 
wife, Elizabeth Howe, died in 1739. He 
built and operated a tannery, and was a man 
of extensive possessions. Jedediah, the next 
in the direct line of descent, was born in 1693, 
and died in 1763. His wife, Bethia Howe, 
died in 1756. Jedediah was the first of the 
Brighams in Hudson. He owned the Brigham 
homestead, which is still in possession of the 
family. Like his father, he was a tanner and 
an extensive property holder, owning lands in 
Princeton, Bolton, and Lancaster, besides his 
farm in this place. 

Jedediah's son Solomon, who was born in 
1723 and died in 1807, married for his first 
wife Martha Boyd. Their son, Ivory Brigham, 
was born in Hudson on April 20, 1765. Dur- 
ing the greater part of his life he was engaged 
in farming. He married on February 9, 
1800, Sally Williams, of Hudson, and became 
the father of eight children. A son Francis 
died in infancy, and one child died shortly 
after its birth. The remaining six were : 
Betsey, Edward, William, Solomon, Francis, 
and Charles. 

Francis Brigham, one of the younger sons of 
Ivory and Sally (Williams) Brigham, has al- 
ready been named as the father of Rufus H., 
the subject of this sketch. His career as a 
business man is familiar to many of the people 
of Hudson, as he was the pioneer in the pres- 
ent extensive business of shoe manufacturing 
in Hudson, and, being for many years associ- 
ated with all important local financial move- 
ments, exercised a controlling and shaping in- 
fluence over the history of the town. He was 
born in Hudson, April 13, 181 3, and nearly 
all his life was spent here. After having 



learned the trade of making shoes by hand and 
having worked at it for a short time, he started 
to manufacture by machinery. For many 
years he was in partnership with William F. 
Trowbridge and Joseph S. Bradley; and upon 
the withdrawal of these gentlemen from the 
firm he associated with himself his sons, Wil- 
bur, Rufus, and Waldo, all of whom, having 
been employed in different departments, 
understood the business from beginning to 
end. This was in 1865. Mr. Waldo Brig- 
ham subsequently withdrew and removed to 
Cambridge, and his interest was bought by 
Rufus and Wilbur. The business at present 
requires about three hundred workmen to carry 
it on, and produces a total of from six hundred 
thousand to eight hundred thousand pairs of 
shoes every year. 

F. Brigham & Co. are the largest real estate 
owners in the town, and they own the principal 
water privileges. Mr. Francis Brigham was 
one of the incorporators of the Hudson Fabric 
Company, was^director in the Hudson National 
Bank, and the first president of the savings- 
bank. He represented the town in the legis- 
lature in 1850. His wife, Sophia, daughter 
of Francis Gleason, was the mother of six 
children, five of whom grew to maturity. 
Rufus, Wilbur, and Waldo have been men- 
tioned. Laura, the only daughter, married 
Charles A. Wood, of Hudson. She is now de- 
ceased. William F. Brigham, the second son, 
was a young man of unusual ability, both as 
a mathematician and as an orator. When 
only eighteen years of age, he delivered the 
Fourth of July oration in Hudson, N.Y., and 
while a school boy had gained the sobriquet 
of "The Eloquent Brigham." He died at 
Annapolis in 1865, having served in Company 
I of the Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Regiment. 

Rufus H. Brigham received his education in 
the public schools of Hudson. For some years 
when a young man he worked in his father's 
factory, but subsequently he took charge of a 
grist-mill and a saw-mill, operating them both 
for a number of years. Upon the death of his 
father in 1880, Mr. Brigham and his son, 
William H., secured an interest in the shoe 
business and have since retained it. In the 
big fire of 1894 Mr. Rufus H. Brigham's 
house and factory were burned, and he took 



BIOGkAtHICAL REVIEW 



255 



his family to Point Allerton, where he has a 
cottage and stable. After remaining there 
through the season, he bought the fine resi- 
dence in Hudson where he now lives. Besides 
his other business interests already named, he 
has managed for many years a store in which 
are sold canned goods, oysters, fish, and vari- 
ous other commodities. 

Mr. Brigham and his wife, Bashie, daughter 
of Moses Mossman, of Sudbury, have one son, 
William Hartvvell. Mrs. Brigham is a regu- 
lar attendant of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Brigham is proprietor of River- 
side Driving Park, which is one of the best 
half-mile tracks in the State. He has been a 
member of the fire department since 1853 ; is 
a member of the Masonic lodge of Hudson; of 
Houghton Chapter, Trinity Commandery; and 
Aleppo Temple of Boston. 

The Hon. William Hartvvell Brigham, 
above named, was born on March i, 1863. 
He was educated in the town schools, and he 
began work in the office of Francis Brigham & 
Co., becoming a member of the firm in 1882, 
since which time the larger part of the busi- 
ness management has devolved upon him. He 
has also had outside business interests. To- 
gether with his father, he owns the Riverside 
Driving Park, managing it under the name of 
R. H. Brigham & Co. He is a director in the 
Hudson National Bank and one of its Finan- 
cial Committee, and is vice-president of the 
savings-bank. In politics he is a Republican, 
and he is closely in touch with the public 
affairs of the town. He was on the Board of 
Selectmen for six years, four years of which he 
was chairman ; and he has been a member of 
the fire department for many years. In 1S92 
he was in the legislature, and served on the 
Committee on Military Affairs. In 1893 he 
served a second term, and was chairman of the 
Committee on Banks and Banking and mem- 
ber of the Committee on Military Affairs. In 
1897 he served as State Senator from the 
Sixth Middlesex District, and was chairman of 
the Senate Committee on Military Affairs 
and member of the Committees on Towns and 
on Education. During his first year in the 
lower branch of the legislature he was ap- 
pointed a member of the special committee to 
be present at the opening exercises of the 



World's Fair, and in 1893 was a member of 
the Committee on Massachusetts Day. He 
also served on a committee appointed on the 
occasion of the funeral of General Benjamin 
F. Butler. 

William H. Brigham married Cora B., 
daughter of Benjamin Dearbon, of Hudson. 
Two children have been born to them — 
Mildred E. and William M. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brigham are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and Mr. Brigham is one of the 
trustees of the society. Fraternally, he is a 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star; of 
Davis Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Houghton Chap- 
ter, Trinity Commandery; Aleppo Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, of Boston ; and of Ransom 
Council, R. A., of which he is one of the 
trustees. He and his father are connected 
with the Improved Order of Red Men. 



MBROSE HEALD, the proprietor of 
Elm Farm, Carlisle, was born in this 
town, January 15, 18 16. A son of 
Lieutenant Cyrus and Charlotte 
(Green) Heald, he is a descendant of Deacon 
John Heald, who was a farmer by occupation, 
and spent his last days in Carlisle. Deacon 
Heald was buried in Acton, and his will is 
now in the possession of his great-great-grand- 
son, Ambrose Heald. His son, Israel Heald, 
who was the great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, cultivated a farm in Concord 
for the greater part of his life. Captain Tim- 
othy Heald, the grandfather, was born and 
reared upon the homestead farm in Carlisle 
when it was a part of Concord. He was a 
lifelong resident of this locality, and he 
served in various town offices, and represented 
his district in the legislature. The maiden 
name of his wife was Hannah Wilkins, who 
after his death married for her second hus- 
band Deacon Parmenter, of Antrim, N.H. 

Lieutenant Cyrus Heald, Ambrose Heald's 
father, was born at the homestead, February 
7, 1793. He succeeded to the ownership of 
the farm, which was situated within the limits 
of Carlisle at its incorporation in 1805. He 
was one of the industrious farmers of his day, 
and also acted as a public auctioneer. In 
public affairs he was a leading spirit, serving 



2s6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



as Town Clerk, Collector, and Representative 
to the legislature. He enjoyed the esteem 
and confidence of his fellow-townsmen, and 
his advice was much sought for. His death 
happened on December 17, 1859. Charlotte 
Green Heald, his wife, was born in Carlisle, 
September 3, 1794, daughter of Nathan and 
Sarah Green. She became the mother of six 
children — Ambrose, Lorenzo, Charlotte, 
Maria, Hannah, and Timothy. Of these the 
survivors are : Charlotte, Hannah, and Am- 
brose. Charlotte married Daniel Harrington 
Page, son of Captain Timothy and Isanna 
(Harrington) Page. Born in Bedford, Mass., 
in January, 18 19, he was a painter and a 
harness-maker in Littleton for many years, 
and died there in 1851. He left three sons 
— George Parmenter, Frederick Augustus, 
and Francis Eugene Page. Since his death 
his widow has resided at the homestead in 
Carlisle. Hannah Heald married Thomas B. 
Hosmer, and resides in Bedford. Mrs. Cyrus 
Heald died March 23, 1876. 

Ambrose Heald was educated in the public 
schools of Carlisle, and began life as a clerk 
in a general store. His principal occupation, 
however, has been the cultivation of the 
homestead farm, the possession of which he 
acquired by purchasing the interests of the 
other heirs. Besides Elm Farm, which con- 
tains upward of one hundred and sixty acres of 
desirable land, he owns some outlying tracts. 
The house is pleasantly situated and sur- 
rounded by magnificent elm - trees. Among 
its furniture are several valuable antiques, in- 
cluding an ancient hall clock and a beautiful 
mahogany sideboard. Mr. Heald has always 
been a great reader, and as a result he is 
well informed upon current topics. 



"ERMON C. TOWER, senior member 
of the firm of Tower Brothers, Hud- 
son, was born in Stow, Mass., 
March 8, 1843, son of Jedediah L. 
and Mary J. (Noyes) Tower. He is a de- 
scendant of Robert and Dorothy (Damon) 
Tower, of Hingham, England, whose son John 
was baptized May 17, 1609, and settled at 
Hingham, Mass., in 1637. 

John Tower was admitted a freeman March | 



13, 1638-39^ — that is, 1639 as the year is now 
reckoned, beginning in January. He was one 
of the Way Wardens in 1657, a Constable in 
1659, and later he served in other town offices. 
He died February 13, 1701-2. He was mar- 
ried in Charlestown, Mass., February 13, 
1638-39, to Margaret Ibrook, who was born in 
England, daughter of Richard Ibrook, and 
who died May 15, 1700. Benjamin Tower, son 
of John, born or baptized November 5, 1654, 
was married in September, 1680, to Deborah, 
born in Hingham, July 5, 1657, daughter of 
John and Mary Garnet, or Gardner. (See 
History of Hingham, vol. ii., Genealogical, 
p. 243, and vol. iii. p. 253.) 

Ambrose Tower, son of Benjamin, was born 
in January, 1 699-1 700, and quite early in 
life he moved from Hingham. The record of 
his marriages could not be found ; but it is 
known that he was living in Hull when his 
oldest son was born, and he later settled in 
that part of Concord, Mass., which was after- 
ward set off as the town of Lincoln. 

Benjamin Tower, great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Sudbury, 
Mass., and baptized March 18, 1738-39. He 
served as a soldier in the French and Indian 
War, being a member of Captain Thomas 
Williams's company at Albany in 1755 or 
1756 and in Captain Nicholas Dakin's com- 
pany in 1758. His name appears in the roster 
of men who enlisted for three years' service in 
the Revolutionary War; and a descriptive list 
of men enrolled for nine months' service, 
agreeable with a resolve passed by the General 
Court of Massachusetts, states that Benjamin 
Tower enlisted June 9, 1779. On January 7, 
1 761, he married Annie Voice, daughter of 
Mark Voice. She was born in Sudbury, De- 
cember 12, 1736, and died January 29, 1824. 

Augustus Tower, grandfather of Hermon 
C. , was born June 23, 1767. At the age of 
fifteen he entered the Continental army, and 
in his application for a pension in 1832 he 
gives the following record of his service: "In 
the month of May, 1782, I enlisted as a pri- 
vate for three years, was mustered in at Boston 
by Colonel Badlam, and joined the army the 
last of April or the forepart of the May follow- 
ing. I was put into the Seventh Massachu- 
setts Regiment, commanded by Colonel John 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Brooks, and into che light infantry company 
commanded by Captain Coburn, Lieutenant 
Given, and Ensign Seaver. The regiment lay 
in York Huts above West Point. Our com- 
pany remained with the regiment until July. 
We then went down to the lines near Kings- 
bridge for the purpose of catching the cow 
boys, as then called. We stayed about there 
and at Fishkill until late in the fall, when we 
joined our regiment, which lay in the huts 
back of Newbury, or New Windsor. Here we 
remained until the next June, when the new 
arrangement took place, and our company was 
commanded by Captain Mills. Our company 
went down to New Rochelle, and was then at 
West Chester, near Kingsbridge, until the fall 
of the year. We then joined a regiment com- 
manded by Colonel William Hull, and 
marched into the city of New York at the time 
the British troops left. We stayed in the city 
until the last of December or the first of Janu- 
ary, when our company went to West Point. 
Our company was then commanded by Captain 
Frye. We stayed at West Point until some 
time in June, when I received my discharge, 
which I have lost. " 

Augustus Tower resided in Stow for many 
years, and was repeatedly chosen to fill impor- 
tant town offices, such as Selectman and As- 
sessor. It appears by the records that he 
served as Town Clerk and Treasurer from 1S04 
to 1826, when he was succeeded by his son; 
that he acted as a Civil Magistrate for a num- 
ber of years; was elected to the legislature 
first in 1809, serving until 1816; was again 
elected in i8ig, serving until 1824; and in 
1826 was once more chosen to represent the 
town. His occupation was that of a carpenter 
and a surveyor. He died in Stow, July 4, 
1838. On December 31, 1792, he married 
Polly Teathe, who was born in 1767. 

Jedediah L. Tower, son of Augustus and 
father of Hermon C, was born in Stow, 
Mass., April 25, 1805. He was educated in 
the town schools, and after learning the car- 
penter's trade he engaged in business for him- 
self. In politics he was originally a Whig, 
but he joined the Republican party at its for- 
mation, and at one time served as a Justice of 
the Peace. Mary Jane Noyes, his wife, whom 
he married in 1839, was born in Wayland, 



Mass., daughter of Samuel and Mary (Plymp- 
ton) Noyes. She became the mother of four 
children, three of whom are living, namely: 
Helen P., born January 5, 1842, now the wife 
of John Whitcomb, of Harvard, Mass. ; Her- 
mon C, the subject of this sketch; and John 
N., born May 30, 1846, who is junior member 
of the firm of Tower Brothers. On March 14, 
1874, John N. Tower married Elsie Hunt, 
born August 24, 1853, daughter of Edward 
and Clementine (Tarbell) Hunt. 

Hermon C. Tower attended the district 
schools of his native town, and at the age of 
seventeen went to Waltham, where he learned 
the trade of a machinist. In August, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company E, Forty-fourth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, which was 
sent to North Carolina, where he participated 
in the battles of Rawls Mills, Kingston, 
Goldsboro, Whitehall, and Little Washington, 
and was honorably discharged June 17, 1863. 
After his return to Waltham he resumed his 
trade, working as a journeyman in that town 
until 1868, when he came to Hudson, and in 
company with his brother engaged in business 
under the firm name of the Tower Brothers. 
This concern makes a spacialty of manufactur- 
ing shoe machinery, which they ship to all 
parts of the United States. 

The senior partner is the inventor of some 
improved machinery which is widely used by 
the trade. He is an incorporator and a direc- 
tor of the Hudson National Bank, is a member 
of the Board of Directors of the co-operative 
bank, and of the Millay Last Company. Po- 
litically, he is a Democrat. He has served as 
a Selectman ten years, and as a Water Com- 
missioner eight years. He has also been an 
Assessor, and during the session of the legis- 
lature in 1890 he was upon the Committee of 
Public Health. He is a member of Doric 
Lodge, F. & A. M., and Houghton Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons. He took the Knights 
Templar degrees in Trinity Commandery, and 
he is a member of Aleppo Temple of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, Boston. He is also a comrade of 
Reno Post, G. A. R. 

Mr. Tower married Mary A. Walker, daugh- 
ter of Samuel Walker, of Fall River, Mass., 
and has had five children, namely: Fred H., 
who died at the age of ten years; Grace W. ; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Gertrude; Martha; and Henry E. The fam- 
ily attend the Unitarian church. 



KEONARD WINCH, president of the 
Natick National Bank, is a represent- 
^ ative citizen of Natick, Mass., and 
one of the leading business men of 
this section of Middlesex County. He was 
born December 29, 1818, in Wellesley, Mass., 
a son of Enoch and Dorcas (Greenwood) 
Winch. The father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, and had a fair start on the road to pros- 
perity when, in 1821, his earthly career was 
cut short by an accident which proved fatal. 
His widow, who was left with three small chil- 
dren to care for, long survived him, dying at 
the home of her son Leonard, in Natick, at 
the venerable age of eighty-eight years. 

Leonard Winch had no other educational ad- 
vantages than those afforded by the district 
school, to which he and his brother trudged 
two miles in the winter season, often wading 
through snow drifts from two to three feet in 
depth, and taking their turn with the boys of 
the neighborhood in arriving early enough to 
make the fires and have the school-room heated 
before the master came. These two sturdy 
Winch lads had but little leisure for study at 
home, the farm chores, including the care of 
fifteen head of cattle, falling upon their young 
shoulders; but they early acquired habits of 
industry, persistency, and thrift that proved 
stepping-stones to their future success. In 
1836 Leonard Winch left the home farm, com- 
ing to the village of Natick, which at that 
time contained but seven houses. He secured 
employment with the late Nathaniel Clark, 
who was just then opening a grocery store, the 
first and for seven years thereafter the only 
one in this vicinity. He remained with Mr. 
Clark as clerk for five years, performing his 
duties with such fidelity and efficiency that on 
December i, 1841, he was admitted into part- 
nership with him. Natick had then increased 
in population to a considerable extent, several 
shoe factories having been established in this 
part of the county; and the new grocery firm 
carried on a very extensive business for some 
years. The store was enlarged, new depart- 
ments were added, including grain, furniture. 



hardware, and dry goods; and the partnership 
continued until 1855, when Mr. Clark suc- 
ceeded to the dry-goods department, and Mr. 
Winch took the grocery department, the firm 
being dissolved by mutual agreement. A few 
years later Mr. Winch sold his store, his real 
estate and other local interests demanding a 
large part of his time; while the rest was de- 
voted to the brick manufacturing company for 
which he had become selling agent. 

In 1868 Mr. Winch was instrumental in 
establishing the Natick Five Cents Savings 
Bank, a very prosperous institution, now hav- 
ing more than one and a half million dollars 
on deposit, and which doubtless owes much of 
its prosperity to his financial sagacity, he 
having been chairman of its Investment Com- 
mittee from the start. In 1874 he circulated 
a subscription, and secured stock for the Na- 
tick National Bank. That his fellow-towns- 
men had implicit faith in his good judgment 
was then shown by the fact that he was offered 
thirty thousand dollars more than the one hun- 
dred thousand dollars required for capitaliza- 
tion ; and the circumstance that, with the ex- 
ception of an occasional transfer through the 
death of a stock-holder, not a share of the 
stock has ever been placed on the market, is 
unmistakable proof that the same confidence 
between him and them still exists. Mr. 
Winch was elected president at the time of its 
organization, and has served continuously till 
the present time. This institution clears 
through the Shoe and Leather Bank of Boston ; 
and its venerable president, though nearing 
his eightieth year, goes into the city every day 
to attend to the bank's paper. Mr. Winch has 
also been prominently identified with the im- 
provement and development of the village in 
which he has lived for the past threescore years 
or more, having built and sold as many as 
twenty-five houses. A large wooden building, 
erected by him in 1872, nearly opposite the 
railway station, being burned in the great fire 
of January 13, 1874, he subsequently replaced 
it by the present handsome brick block which 
now occupies its site. 

He has been a stanch Republican in poli- 
tics since the organization of that party, but 
has never been prevailed upon to accept public 
office. During the late war, however, he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



chairman of the Military Committee, which 
sent out three companies of men from Natick. 
Through some error the town was not credited 
with her full quota of one hundred and forty- 
five men, and demand was made for that num- 
ber. The town officers were powerless, and 
Mr. Winch, rising to the exigencies of the 
occasion, had proofs prepared and a letter in 
regard thereto written by personal and influen- 
tial friends of his in Boston to President Lin- 
coln. These documents were taken to Wash- 
ington by G. W. Fay, who, it is said, by 
Yankee strategy, and a five-dollar bill adroitly 
tucked in the vest pocket of the dusky door- 
keeper, secured a personal interview with Lin- 
coln,' made a satisfactory explanation, and thus 
saved the town thousands of dollars. 

Mr. Winch was first married in 1842 to 
Lucy Farris, who died leaving two daughters, 
Sarah Jane and Lizzie F. Sarah Jane Winch, 
who married Mr. Harrison Harwood, of Na- 
tick, died in 1896; and Lizzie, wife of Frank 
H. Hayes, died in 1888. Mr. Winch was 
married the second time on May 7, 1873, to 
Miss Valetta Fuller, of Needham. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Winch are active members of the 
Congregational church, and are well known in 
benevolent and social circles. Their home, a 
pleasant dwelling, with spacious grounds bor- 
dered with beautiful shade-trees that were set 
out by Mr. Winch himself more than half a 
century ago, is the abode of true New England 
hospitality. 



I^AMUEL WALKER, of Watertown, 
one of the pioneer manufacturers of 
kerosene, was born in Langdon, 
N.H., February 9, 1818, son of 
Gilson and Abigail (Carter) Walker. He is 
a descendant in the seventh generation of 
Captain Richard Walker, from whom the line 
is traced directly through Samuel, Joseph, 
Seth, Samuel, Abel, to his father, Gilson 
Walker, named above. 

Richard Walker was born in England in 
1592, and emigrated with his family in 1630, 
first settling in Lynn, Mass. He became a 
freeman in 1634, rose from an Ensign to the 
Captaincy of the military company in Lynn, 
and joined the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 



lery in 1638. He lived to be ninety-five years 
old, and died at Lynn in May, 1687. He 
reared several children. 

The second of these, Samuel Walker, was 
born in England about the year 1615. He 
moved from Lynn to Reading, Mass., and later 
to Woburn, where, it is known, he was one of 
the highway surveyors in 1662 and a Select- 
man in 1668. His occupation was that of 
maltster. In 1675 he was licensed to keep a 
tavern, he being the first person to open a 
house for public entertainment in Woburn. 
He died November 6, 16S4, aged sixty-nine 
years. The maiden name of his wife is un- 
known, but records show that he was the father 
of several children, of whom Joseph was next 
to the eldest. 

Joseph Walker was born in Reading in 
1645. He was a tithing-man of Billerica in 
1667, was made a freeman in 167S, and was a 
Representative to the General Court in 1679. 
On December 15, 1669, he married Sarah 
Wyman, born April 15, 1650, daughter of 
John and Sarah (Nutt) Wyman, of Woburn. 
Joseph Walker died in July, 1729, aged 
eighty-four years; and his wife died January 
26, 1728. They had ten children, of whom 
Seth was the youngest. 

Seth Walker was born in Woburn, October 
12, 1 691. He resided in Groton, Mass., as 
early as 1734; and in 1741 he went to what is 
now Westminster, where he erected a grist- 
mill, the first ever operated in that region. 
In 1750 he removed to what is now Charles- 
town, N. H., and his name appears in the roster 
of a company raised the same year by Captain 
Phineas Stevens to protect the frontier settlers 
from the anticipated attacks of the French and 
Indians. On April 4, 1716, he married 
Eleanor Chandler, born in Concord in 1695, 
daughter of William and Eleanor (Phelps) 
Chandler, of Andover, Mass. 

Samuel, second, known as Captain Samuel 
Walker, was the third child of this union. 
He was born August 30, 1721, in Shirley, 
Mass. He was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits during his active period, and occupied a 
prominent place among the leading men of the 
community, serving as Town Treasurer for 
twelve years. He worked his way forward 
from a subaltern to the commander of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



militia company, and was one of the eighty 
men of Shirley who responded to the Lexing- 
ton alarm on April 19, 1775. His wife was 
Mary Stratton, daughter of Ebenezer and 
Lydia Stratton, of Watertown. They were 
married on December 20, 1750, and they 
reared seven children, of whom the fourth-born 
was Abel. Six of them married and removed 
to New Hampshire, where they became pio- 
neers in the settlement of a new county. Cap- 
tain Samuel Walker died December 15, 1S17, 
aged ninety-six years, and his wife died De- 
cember 7, 1794. 

Abel Walker was born in Shirley, July 11, 
1759. He settled in Charlestown, N.H., and 
engaged in farming. Many years later, when 
that town was divided, his property was in- 
cluded within the limits of Langdon. On 
February 22, 1783, he married Hannah Page. 
She bore him twelve children, of whom Gilson 
was the eldest; and none are now living. 
Abel Walker died when he was seventy years 
old. His wife lived to be eighty-three years. 
Gilson Walker, father of Mr. Samuel Walker 
of Watertown, was a prosperous farmer of 
Langdon. 

Samuel Walker, third, the subject of this 
sketch, was educated in the schools of his na- 
tive town, and worked as a farm assistant until 
he was twenty-five years old. He then en- 
gaged in the produce business in Boston as a 
member of the firm of Lane & Walker, which 
two years later was changed to Sartwell & 
Walker, and under this name continued in 
business for fourteen years. In 1859 Mr. 
Walker started in the manufacture of kerosene 
from bituminous coal imported from Scotland, 
he being the second to enter the business; and 
since the discovery of the oil wells in Pennsyl- 
vania he has been engaged in refining crude 
petroleum for illuminating purposes. This 
concern, which has been known as Samuel 
Walker & Co. since its establishment, was at 
first located in East Cambridge, but at the 
present time the works are in Somerville. 
Mr. Walker has resided at 7 Winter Street, 
Watertown, since July, 1854, and has taken 
an active part in public affairs. He served 
upon the Board of Selectmen for three years, 
was Representative to the legislature during 
the years 1881 and 18S2, and has held other 



offices of responsibility and trust. His busi- 
ness success has been accomplished through 
his personal ability, as he was forced to make 
his own way in the world; and that he has 
made the best use of his resources is attested 
by the fact of his being numbered among 
Watertown's most well-to-do citizens. He 
possesses many sterling qualities as a citizen, 
not the least of which is his benevolence, and 
he is sincerely esteemed by his fellow-towns- 
men. 

On September 12, 1848, Mr. Walker was 
united in marriage with Nancy W. Pierce, 
born August 21, 1827, daughter of James and 
Nancy (Waitt) Pierce, of Marblehead, Mass. 
Mrs. Walker has been the mother of six chil- 
dren, three of whom are living, namely: 
Abbie M., born September 19, 1849; Alma 
Carter, born January 22, 1855; and Mabel 
Waitt, born November 5, 1858. Abbie M. 
was married on June 6, 1872, to Charles B. 
Gardner, and has one son living — Roy Rich- 
ardson, born March 6, 1S73. In ' October, 
1 881, Alma Carter Walker became the wife of 
William Channing Whitney, of Minneapolis, 
Minn. Their children are Marion and Kath- 
erine. Mabel Waitt Walker was married to 
John Dana Dickerson, of Boston, on April 12, 
1877, and has two children: Mabel Draper, 
born March 17, 1S78; and John Walker Dick- 
erson, born October 20, 1879. 



EACON GEORGE HOVEY, a 
prominent citizen of Dracut, Mid- 
SJ dlesex County, Mass., was born in 
his present home, November 26, 
1 8 10. His parents were James Platts and 
Rebecca (Hovey) Plovey. Daniel Hovey was 
the pioneer of the family in this State. He 
settled in" Ipswich, Essex County; and his 
dwelling-house, erected in 1670, was standing 
up to within a few years. 

Thomas Hovey, Deacon Hovey' s grand- 
father, was born in Ipswich and reared in An- 
dover. He came to Dracut as a teacher in 
1758, and settled here permanently in 1760. 
A part of the present house stood on the land 
which he bought at that time, and he added to 
it. He was well educated, he. had force of 
character and good judgment, and was the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



leading man of his time in Dracut. He was 
often employed to draw up legal papers and to 
perform other duties requiring clerical knowl- 
edge. He was an Ensign in the State mili- 
tia, was Selectman of the town for thirty 
years, Town Treasurer for an extended period, 
was moderator of the meeting that located the 
Congregational church at Dracut Centre, and 
he was a Deacon of the church for fifty years. 
He died July 30, 1S26, in his ninetieth year. 
His wife, to whom he was married in Andover, 
died in 181 3, just within the memory of her 
grandson, George Hovey. She was seventy- 
six years old. Their children were : Thomas, 
Jr., who died at the age of fifty, leaving no 
family; Henry A., who resided in Milford, 
N. H. ; John, who died at the age of seventeen ; 
James Platts, the father named above ; Mary, 
who died in Pelham, N.H., wife of Moses 
Whiting; Elizabeth, single woman, now de- 
ceased; Samuel, a carpenter; Benjamin, a 
hatter; Joshua, who never married; and 
Joseph, who was a carpenter and lived in Dra- 
cut, dying there at the age of seventy-six. 
Joseph, Jr., son of Joseph, resides in Central- 
ville. 

James Platts Hovey was born in the old 
house in 1767. He was a farmer, and spent 
his life on the homestead. Mr. Hovey took 
part in Shays's Rebellion. He died Novem- 
ber 30, 1831. He was married in 1801 to 
Rebecca, daughter of Captain Ivory Hovey, 
of Boxford, Mass. , a distant kinsman. She 
died January 31, 1853. The following is the 
record of their children : William, a shoe- 
maker, died in Centralville at the age of 
ninety years and six months, James died in 
Waldoboro, Me., in 1855, aged fifty-one. 
Horatio, a merchant of East Cambridge, re- 
cently celebrated his ninety-second birthday. 
Joshua, a shoemaker, lives in Centralville. 
He is ninety years old. George is the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Cyrus, who was a silver- 
smith residing in Centralville, died in 1890, 
aged seventy-seven. 

George Hovey was just of age when his 
father died, and at that time he took charge of 
the farm. He has been for many years suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming, having 
lived at the homestead, with the exception of 
three months, ever since his birth. He is a 



Deacon of the Congregational church in which 
his grandfather was so active. He was mar- 
ried December 30, 1841, to Nancy Wood, a 
native of Sutton, Vt. , by whom he had three 
sons. The eldest, James Sylvester, was 
cashier of the Railroad Bank in Lowell up to 
the time of his death in 1885. He left four 
children — James B., Philip R., Elizabeth D., 
and Marion. Edwin (unmarried) was for a 
number of years with the Middlesex Company 
in Lowell. He is now on the farm with his 
father. The youngest son, George H., is with 
a wholesale millinery company in Chicago. 
Deacon Hovey's wife, Mrs. Nancy W. Hovey, 
died July 6, 1891, aged seventy-one. Had 
she lived a few months longer they would have 
celebrated their golden wedding. 

He was formerly connected with the old 
Whig party and the early abolitionists, and 
has now long been a strong Republican. In 
1840 he and his five brothers voted for General 
William H. Harrison; and in 1888 he and the 
other four then living voted for the first Presi- 
dent Harrison's grandson. It is probable that 
this case is not paralleled in the history of the 
country. Deacon Hovey has a photograph of 
four of these brothers, all past eighty years of 
age, taken in a group by the window of the old 
house where they were born. He has served 
as Town Clerk six years and as Town Treas- 
urer three years. One of his treasured heir- 
looms is an old clock made by Nathaniel 
Mulliken, of Lexington, who died in 1767. 
It was purchased by his grandfather, Thomas 
Hovey, and is still in good condition. The 
weight-strings, placed there when the Deacon 
was a boy, are still in use. 



XTrEDERICK O. BASTON, treasurer 
pi of the Natick Five Cents Savings 
Bank, of Natick, Mass., was born Jan- 
uary 14, 1852, in Bridgton, Me. He is a son 
of the late Hiram Baston, Jr., formerly of 
Bridgton, later of Portland, Me. His grand- 
father, Lliram Baston, Sr., was a well-known 
farmer of Hiram, Me., and a man of consider- 
able distinction in public affairs. He owned a 
large share of real estate, and was also trustee 
in many cases of real and personal property be- 
longing to minors. Having a good knowledge 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the law, he was often called upon to execute 
deeds and other legal documents, and he was 
in various other ways connected with the 
affairs of the community. Among his grand- 
children who are prominent in public life is 
Albion A. Perry, now Mayor of Somerville, 
Mass. 

Hiram Baston, Jr., spent his early life in 
the town of Hiram, Oxford County, Me., 
whence he removed to Bridgton, Cumberland 
County, that State, where he established a 
carriage manufactory. A man of much energy 
and enterprise, he was ever ready to take 
advantage of favorable opportunities for in- 
creasing his financial resources, and at three 
different times he went to California for that 
purpose. In his trips across the country he 
had many thrilling experiences, more especially 
when he accompanied the early pioneers of the 
mining regions. At a subsequent time he had 
engaged passage in a steamer, but he failed to 
reach the wharf before she sailed, a fortunate 
circumstance, as she foundered off the coast 
and not a soul on board was saved. While en- 
gaged at Sacramento in the manufacture of 
heavy overland wagons for ti-avel between St. 
Louis and San Francisco, he was among the 
first to have experience with Chinese labor in 
America. He remained in that city until the 
burning of his factories by the great fire that 
devastated the place, when he returned to 
Bridgton, where he was for some years pur- 
chasing agent of the woollen-mills of the 
town. He afterward bought the Mount Cut- 
ler Hotel property, and for a score or more of 
years conducted a first-class public house. On 
retiring from active business, he removed to 
Portland, Me., where his death occurred at 
the age of seventy-three years. He married 
Mary H. Thompson, whose mother was a 
cousin of Ralph Waldo Emerson. They 
reared five children; namely, Nathan P., 
Lizzie M., Reuben R., Anna A., and Fred- 
erick O. 

Nathan P. Baston, who was graduated from 
the Portland Business College, was the first 
man to enlist from l^ridgton in the late Civil 
War. He entered the First Maine Cavalry, 
twice re-enlisted, and served until the cessa- 
tion of hostilities, the latter part of the time 
holding the rank of Orderly Sergeant. He 



was also appointed inspector of equipments at 
New Orleans. The only wound he received 
was caused by being thrown from his horse 
over an embankment, and that was not serious. 
He subsequently went to South America on 
business, and at Rio Janeiro was again thrown 
from a horse, receiving injuries that proved 
fatal. 

Lizzie M. Baston, a graduate from West- 
brook Seminary, was for a time superintendent 
of the woman's department of the Maine 
Asylum. She afterward married Captain An- 
drew Fuller, whom she frequently accompanied 
on his voyages to China, Europe, and other 
foreign countries. She possessed unusual lit- 
erary attainments, and was a gifted writer. 
Interesting accounts of her various trips, 
which she wrote in later years, are carefully 
cherished by her brother Frederick O. , who 
also has among his keepsakes her album, con- 
taining autograph letters from men of world- 
wide reputation — Horace Greeley, J. S. C. 
Abbott, Wendell Phillips, Charles Francis 
Adams, Phillips Brooks, John G. Whittier, 
Henry W. Longfellow, Henry Wilson, Fred- 
erick Douglass, General Sherman, ancl others. 
She was a personal friend of Longfellow, with 
whom she read Shakspere, and of Whittier, 
who dedicated one of his poems to her. She 
died after a very brief illness of diphtheria, 
contracted while nursing her- brother Reuben. 

Reuben R. Baston was graduated from Bow- 
doin College in the class of 1875, and in 1877 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the medical department of the college. 
He ranked very high in scholarship, especially 
in English, and had a graduation thesis. He 
located as a physician at Cape Elizabeth, 
where he contracted diphtheria from a patient, 
and died a martyr to his profession. Anna 
A. Baston is the wife of William G. Dear- 
born, a coal merchant in Boston and a resi- 
dent of Brookline. 

Frederick O. Baston was graduated in 1871 
from Fryeburg Academy and in 1875 from 
Bowdoin College, where he earned class honors 
and had a leading part in the graduating exer- 
cises. He was very prominent and active in 
athletic sports while there, being stroke oar 
of the class team, captain of the class crew, 
and first base man of the 'varsity baseball team. 




STEPHEN HAYES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



-•6s 



He was also a member of the Psi Upsilon fra- 
ternity. He began his professional career as 
principal of the North Berwick High School, 
but resigned in 1876 to accept a similar posi- 
tion in the Natick High School. In 1881 Mr. 
Baston accepted the principalship of the 
Wellesley High School, where he was suc- 
cessfully engaged five years, when he resigned 
to accept an office in the Natick National 
Bank. He became treasurer of the Natick 
Five Cents Savings Bank in 1889, and has 
since discharged the duties of his responsible 
position with characteristic ability and fidel- 
ity. He is an active factor in local politics, 
deeply interested in the cause of education, 
has served six years on the Natick School 
Board, and five years as trustee of the Morse 
Institute, and was recently chosen to serve a 
further term of five years. 

Mr. Baston was married July 7, 1884, to 
Miss Mary O. , daughter of Foster T. Hobbs, 
who was for many years a distinguished teacher 
of Gloucester, Mass. 



DGAR S. HAYES, an esteemed resident 
of Natick, was born in this town, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1S45, son of the late 
Stephen Hayes. He comes of distinguished 
ancestry, being a lineal descendant of Captain 
Asa Drury, who commanded a company of 
soldiers in the Revolutionary War. His 
grandfather, Rufus Morse, formerly owned a 
large part of the land now occupied by the 
present village of Natick, as well as the old 
Morse Tavern, which stood on the present site 
of the Catholic parochial residence, and was 
destroyed by an incendiary fire in 1871. 
This well-known hostelry, located about half- 
way on the stage route between Boston and 
Worcester, was the scene of many a merry 
ball and rout in the good old days. Some 
that are now living can recall the times 
when a lighted candle in each window of this 
large inn (for it was three stories high, and 
contained a hall eighty-three by twenty feet) 
was a signal for the country folk for miles 
around to gather, and trip on the light fan- 
tastic toe. Rufus Morse was largely en- 
gaged in the manufacture of bricks in Natick, 
having extensive yards here, from which he 



supplied the material for many of the promi- 
nent buildings of Hopkinton, Sherborn, and 
other towns. He was quite active in town 
affairs, and served as Selectman, Assessor, 
and in other public capacities. He married 
Miss Hannah Drury; and their daughter, 
Maria Morse, married Stephen Hayes. Maria 
Morse Hayes is still living, vigorous in mind 
and body, though fourscore years old. 

Stephen Hayes, born in F'armington, N.H., 
spent the greater part of his active life in 
Middlesex County, where he was well known 
and respected. One of the most noted horse- 
men of his day, he was also famed as a 
trainer, driver, and breeder, and an expert 
judge of horseflesh. He had extensive stables 
at Allston and at Beacon Park, was one of the 
builders of Mystic Park, and he bred some of 
the most valuable colts in the world at that 
time. In 1S74 he met with an accident that 
necessitated the amputation of his left hand. 
Yet in two weeks he was out again, and de- 
spite his loss was afterward frequently seen in 
the sulky, driving in many exciting races with 
his remaining hand. He died May 11, 1880, 
from Bright's disease. Of the three children 
born to him and his wife two died in infancy, 
Edgar S. being the only survivor. 

Edgar S. Hayes received his general educa- 
tion at private schools and in the Natick High 
School. Afterward he took a course of study 
at French's Business College in Boston. 
Though he was never very strong physically, 
he manufactured shoes in Natick for some 
years, and had a good business until the de- 
struction of his factories in the great fire of 
January 13, 1874. Since then, besides con- 
ducting the home estate, he has practised 
photography. With an artistic taste and an 
ingenious turn of mind, he has produced some 
unique mechanical effects for exhibits with the 
stereopticon. As long as his health permit- 
ted, Mr. Hayes was kept busy in exhibiting 
to the public his beautiful dissolving views, 
in arranging tableaux with calcium lights, 
and in illustrating lectures, etc. Among the 
most noted of the latter are "A Trip around 
the World" and the "History of Natick." 
His residence is a most attractive spot for the 
art connoisseur, being a perfect storehouse of 
rare and beautiful specimens of art. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ANIEL WEBSTER ROBBINS, a 

prominent and well-known resident 
of Carlisle, was born in this town, 
January 1 1, 1S45, son of John Dana 
and Caroline (Lakin) Robbins. The father, 
who was both a native and a lifelong resident 
of Carlisle, and owned and managed a farm in 
the neighborhood of his birthplace, was prob- 
ably the largest man in the county, weighing 
four hundred and fifty pounds. He died in 
1858, aged forty-nine years. His wife, 
another native of Carlisle, and a daughter of 
John and Betsey (Heald) Lakin, died in her 
eighty-fourth year. They reared seven chil- 
dren — John, Samuel H., Paulina N., Mary 
H., Charles H., Maria G., and Daniel 
Webster. 

Daniel Webster Robbins received a district- 
school education. He had been working on 
the home farm for some time when the Civil 
War began. Then, though only sixteen years 
old, he enlisted in Company C of the Six- 
teenth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer 
Infantry, which, afterward consolidated with 
the First, became the Eleventh Regiment. 
Excluding a furlough of thirty days in Febru- 
ary of 1864, Mr. Robbins was continuously in 
active service for four years. He was in the 
Army of the Potomac under Generals Mc- 
Clellan, Burnside, Hooker, Meade, and Grant. 
He participated in thirty-three engagements, 
including those of Fair Oaks, Glendale, Mal- 
vern Hill, second Bull Run, Chantilly, Fred- 
ericksburg, Gettysburg, Locust Grove, the 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, the siege of Peters- 
burg, and the action at Deep Bottom. His 
regiment was the first to enter Norfolk after 
its surrender. At Spottsylvania he was 
slightly wounded by a rebel bullet. He was 
also an eye-witness of the fight between the 
"Merrimac" and "Monitor," and he was 
present at Lee's surrender at Appomattox. 
He received his discharge July 15, 1865, and 
participated in the Grand Review at Washing- 
ton in May. Returning home, he remained 
but a short time, starting for California in 
1866. He went by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama, and was twenty-one days making the 
journey. For a good part of the four years he 
spent in California he was employed in team- 
ing the iron to complete the Central Railroad. 



After returning East, he learned the trades of 
plasterer and bricklayer, which he has since 
followed. He built the Gleason Library, one 
of the handsomest edifices of its kind in the 
State. In 1885 he purchased the farm he now 
occupies, near the village, and since that time 
he has been engaged in farming in addition to 
his other work. 

Mr. Robbins was married in 1871 to Lizzie 
Luella, daughter of Horace N. and Sibyl 
(Spalding) Wilson. She was born in North 
Billerica, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins have 
five children — Alice Luella, Fred Everett, 
Sarah Frances, Waldo Sherman, and William 
Francis. Mr. Robbins is a member of Gar- 
field Post, No. 120, G. A. R., and belongs to 
Chelmsford Lodge, No. 218, L O. O. F. For 
seven years he served as Selectman, being for 
five years the chairman of the board. He is 
now serving his third term as Town Assessor. 
He was Constable for twelve years. A mem- 
ber for twenty years of the State militia. Troop 
F, Cavalry of Chelmsford, 'he was Sergeant 
for eight years. 



/T^ORNELIUS SAMPSON JACKSO 
I Ky M. D., a popular physician of Hudsc 
^^^^ was born in Fairhaven, Mass., ¥i 



JACKSON, 
Ison, 
■eb- 
ruary 22, 1844, son of Thomas and 
Sophronia (Bishop) Hathaway Jackson. The 
first of the family in this country, so far as is 
known, was Abraham Jackson of the Plymouth 
Colony, who in 1657 married Remember, 
daughter of Nathaniel Morton. Dr. Jackson's 
great-grandfather was Samuel Jackson, who 
married Experience At wood. His grand- 
father, Thomas Jackson, born in 1754, suc- 
cessively married Lucy Sampson and Sarah Le 
Baron. Thomas was a minute-man of Plym- 
outh. It is related regarding him that on 
April 19, 1775, he went to Marshfield in 
Captain Abraham Hammett's company, and 
that, after serving for only seven days. Gov- 
ernor Gage, fearing for the safety of Boston, 
called Captain Balfour of the British army, 
who was protecting the loyalists of Marshfield, 
whereupon Captain Hammett and his men 
went back to Plymouth. By his first marriage 
Thomas Jackson's children were: Ezra, Cor- 
nelius Sampson, Desire, Frederick, Caroline, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



267 



George, Thomas, and Lucy Jackson. Cor- 
nelius Sampson Jackson, uncle and namesake 
of the Doctor, married Nancy Bishop, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Crandon, and had one daugh- 
ter, Lucy Ann, born in 1816, who married 
Asa Law. Cornelius was in business in the 
South, where he died of yellow fever. From 
his effects, which were sent home to Plymouth 
and disinfected by burial for the space of 
three months, both his wife and her sister 
contracted the disease and were subsequently 
carried off by it. 

Thomas Jackson, father of the Doctor, was 
born in Plymouth in 1799. At an early age 
he went to sea, and, while still a young man, 
became master of a vessel. He was engaged 
in whaling for some time, sailing from New 
Bedford. After reaching middle age, he re- 
tired from the sea and purchased a large farm 
in Fairhaven. This property he sold in 1857, 
and then went back to Plymouth, where he re- 
sided until his death in 1880. He was a 
Democrat of the old school, unflinching and 
aggressive, and a devoted member of the Uni- 
tarian church. His first marriage was con- 
tracted with Sophronia Bishop Hathaway, 
daughter of John Bishop, of Rochester, Mass. 
She bore him four children : Lucia S. , born in 
1838, now the widow of George H. Griffin and 
a resident of North Cambridge, Mass. ; George 
F., born in 1840, now deceased, who married 
Hannah T. Mayo; Betsey H., born in 1S45, 
also deceased, who married Edward E. Green, 
of Plymouth; and Cornelius S. , the subject of 
this sketch. By the second wife, Mary Ann, 
who was the widow of Silas Shaw, and whom 
he married in 1873, there were no children. 

Cornelius Sampson Jackson received his 
early education in the public schools, and 
began the study of medicine in the office of 
Dr. Benjamin H. Hubbard in Plymouth. He 
subsequently entered Harvard Medical School, 
graduating therefrom in 1865. After his grad- 
uation he at once became assistant surgeon of 
the Thirtieth Massachusetts Regiment, with 
which he served until he received his discharge 
on July 4, 1866. After his return North he 
settled for the practice of his profession in 
Middleboro, Mass., but subsequently located 
in the city of Lowell. In both places he 
followed the rules of the old school. Com- 



ing to Hudson in 1877, he began the practice 
of homoeopathy, and has since followed it very 
successfully. At present he is the oldest resi- 
dent jjhysician of the new school for miles 
around. Every year he has a large number of 
surgical as well as of medical cases. He is a 
member of the Boston Surgical and Gynasco- 
logical Society, and takes an active interest in 
its proceedings. 

Dr. Jackson is also a member of Mayflower 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Middle- 
boro, Mass. ; Past Grand Master and Past 
District Deputy Grand Master of Hudson 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
P. C. P. and P. D. D. G. P. of King Saul 
Encampment, No. 69; a member of Rock Bot- 
tom Council, No. 222, R. A. ; of B. W. Glea- 
son Council, Home Council of Rock Bottom ; 
and a comrade of Reno Post No. g, G. A. R. 
He married Emma L., daughter of Samuel J. 
Wright of North Cambridge, and has one 
daughter, Ida L. Mrs. Jackson is a member 
of the Baptist church. 



ENRY SHELDON, a successful lum- 
berman of Wilmington and a son of 
Asa G. Sheldon, late of this town, 
was born in Reading, Mass., Octo- 
ber 26, 1822. His American ancestor on the 
paternal side was Godfrey Sheldon ; and his 
great-grandfather was Skelton Sheldon, a na- 
tive of Massachusetts. Jeremiah Sheldon, the 
grandfather, who was liberally educated, acted 
as private secretary to Judge Houghton, one of 
the early members of Congress from this 
State when the seat of the federal govern- 
ment was in Philadelphia. He married Eliza- 
beth Goodell, whose father was related to 
General Israel Putnam, and whose maternal 
grandparents were English people, having 
come from the Island of Barbadoes, bringing 
with them seventeen slaves. Mrs. Jeremiah 
Sheldon was the mother of eight children. 

Asa G. Sheldon, Henry Sheldon's father, 
was born in Lynnfield, Mass., October 24, 
1788. He earned his first wages, six and a 
quarter cents per day, working for William 
Flint, of North Reading. When twelve years 
old he was paid one shilling a day to drive 
oxen in the field. He was later engaged in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farming, butchering, and contracting, and 
eventually settled in Wilmington, where he 
resided for the rest of his life, which termi- 
nated at the age of eighty-four years. He was 
an active, industrious, and public-spirited citi- 
zen, for whose many commendable qualities 
his fellow-townsmen had the highest estima- 
tion; and he was unsparing of his efforts to 
advance the interests of the community. His 
wife, before marriage Clarissa Eames, of Wil- 
mington, became the mother of ten children; 
namely, Clarissa, Caroline, Lavinia, Henry, 
Horace, Nancy E., H. Allen, Sarah C, Har- 
riet S. , and Mary Russell Sheldon. 

Henry Sheldon resided in Reading until he 
was seven years old, at which time he came 
with his parents to Wilmington. Here he 
began his education in the district school, and 
completed it under the guidance of Professor 
Greenleaf, a private tutor. When a young 
man he assisted his father upon the farm and 
in the contracting business, being for some 
time employed in removing earth from Pem- 
berton Hill, the elder Sheldon having con- 
tracted to reduce it to level ground. At a 
later date he engaged in butchering, which he 
continued for some years, slaughtering annu- 
ally cattle to the average value of forty thou- 
sand dollars. He has been interested in lum- 
bering for several years past, giving his entire 
attention to logging and manufacturing lum- 
ber, operating two saw-mills, and last year 
sawing the timber of two hundred acres of 
land. He has taken an active part in public 
affairs, having served as a Selectman for three 
years and as an Assessor for five, and he ranks 
as one of Wilmington's most energetic and 
progressive business men. Mr. Sheldon first 
married Elizabeth Cowing. A second mar- 
riage subsequently united him with Sarah 
Cowing, his first wife's sister. The handsome 
residence he now occupies was erected by him 
in 1861. 



(S^VLEXANDER V. G. ALLEN, D.D., 
h\ professor of ecclesiastical history in 
Jj\\ the Episcopal Theological School 
^^-^ at Cambridge, was born in Otis, 
Berkshire County, Mass., May 4, 1841, son of 
the Rev. Ethan Allen and Lydia Child Burr. 



His grandfather, Nehemiah Allen, lived and 
died in Londonderry, Vt., having removed to 
that place from Providence, R.L 

Ethan Allen after his father's death at- 
tended the Bristol Academy at Taunton, 
Mass., and Brown University in Providence, 
where he was graduated in 1823. Going 
South, he was engaged as tutor in a private 
family by the name of Page, and at the same 
time studied theology under Bishop Mead, of 
Virginia. He was ordained to the Episcopal 
ministry about the year 1835; and in 1837 he 
became an assistant to Dr., afterward Bishop, 
Whitehouse at St. Luke's Church in Roches- 
ter, N.Y. A year afterward he took a church 
at Otis, with missions in New Boston and 
Blandford. Thence he removed to Nantucket, 
and from there to Guilford, Vt. Lydia Child 
Burr, whom he married, was the daughter of 
James and Elizabeth (Watson) Burr, and was 
a descendant in the sixth generation of Jona- 
than Burr, a colleague of the Rev. Richard 
Mather in the First Church in Dorchester. 
Jonathan Burr had been a minister of the 
Church of England. He came to America in 
1640. The Burrs settled at Hingham, from 
whence they emigrated to Rehoboth, Mass., 
where the old homestead is situated, and 
where six generations of the family have lived 
and died. The Rev. Ethan Allen died in 
1867, at the age of seventy-two; and his wife 
died in 1886, in the eighty-seventh year of 
her age. 

Alexander Viets Griswold Allen received 
his name from Bishop Griswold, who bap- 
tized him. In his early years he attended 
the public schools of Nantucket, including 
the high school of that place. He also 
studied under his father for some time, and 
then, going to Guilford, Vt., in 1856, attended 
the West Brattleboro Academy for two years. 
In 1859 he entered Kenyon College at Gam- 
bier, Ohio, graduating in 1862. He studied 
for two years at the Theological Seminary at 
Gambler, and then returned to Massachusetts 
with Dr. Francis Wharton, one of the instruc- 
tors at Gambler, previously a distinguished 
lawyer of Philadelphia and author of various 
works on jurisprudence. Dr. Wharton, who 
was interested in the young man and induced 
him to come to Massachusetts, had become 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



rector of St. Paul's Church in Brookline. 
When the Episcopal Theological School at 
Cambridge was founded, Dr. Wharton, it may 
be mentioned, was called upon by its founder, 
Mr. Benjamin T. Read, of Boston, to draw up 
the constitution and organize the faculty. 
He died in Washington soon after the close 
of President Cleveland's first administration, 
during which he was the legal adviser of the 
Department of State and a personal friend 
of Secretary Bayard. To the Life of Dr. 
Wharton, edited by his widow, Dr. Allen 
was a contributor. 

Graduating from the Andover Theological 
Seminary in 1865, Alexander V. G. Allen 
was ordained priest in 1866 by Bishop East- 
burn, and while in Andover began a mission 
in Lawrence, which proved so successful that 
a church was built there a year later, called 
St. John's Church, of which he was rector for 
one year. In 1867 he was elected professor of 
ecclesiastical history in the lipiscopal Theo- 
logical School at Cambridge. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Kenyon 
in 1877 and the same degree from Harvard 
in 1886, upon the occasion of the two hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
university. As an author Dr. Allen is well 
known in religious and literary circles. His 
published works to date are: "The Continu- 
ity of Christian Thought: A Study of 
Modern Theology in the Light of its His- 
tory," published by Messrs. Houghton & 
Mifflin in 1884; the Life of Jonathan Ed- 
wards, published by the same firm in 1889; 
"Religious Progress," a series of lectures de- 
livered at Yale University and published in 
1894; "Christian Institutions," published by 
Charles Scribner's Sons in 1897. Dr. Allen 
is at present engaged upon the Memoir of 
Phillips Brooks, a work handed to him to 
finish after the premature death of Dr. Arthur 
Brooks, who had made preparations for it. 
Among his contributions to different periodi- 
cals may be named: "The Renaissance of 
Theology," in the Princeton Review, 1881; 
"Samuel Hopkins and the Transition in New 
England Theology," in the Atlantic Monthly ; 
an article on Phillips Brooks in the same, 
1893, and one on Samuel Taylor Coleridge 
in 1895; also an article on Dean Stanley 



and one on "The Tractarian Movement," in 
the Neiv World. He contributed an essay on 
Maurice to the "Prophets of the Christian 
Faith" in 1896, and to a book called "Chris- 
tian Worship" he contributed a lecture on 
"Early Christian Liturgies." 

In 1886 he was elected a member of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society. He is also 
connected with several clubs. He married in 
1872 Elizabeth Kent Stone, daughter of the 
Rev. John S. Stone and grand-daughter of 
Chancellor James Kent, the author of Kent's 
Commentaries, and sister of James Kent Stone, 
well known in Catholic circles. Mrs. Allen 
died in 1892, leaving two sons: Henry Van 
Dyke Allen, who graduated from Harvard in 
1895 and from the Lawrence Scientific School 
in 1896; and John Stone Allen, now a mem- 
ber of Harvard University. 



HARLES FORBUSH, one of the 
town fathers of Carlisle, was born on 
the farm where he resides, January 
II, 1840, son of Captain Paul 
Green and Olive (Green) Forbush. His im- 
migrant ancestor on the paternal side came 
from Aberdeen, Scotland, some time previous 
to the year 1700. His grandfather, Paul 
Forbush, was born in Acton, Mass., January 
30, 1772. Paul settled on the farm now occu- 
pied by his grandson in 1800, and there he 
died September 24, 1830. On January 15, 
1 801, he was married to Hannah Green, who, 
born in Carlisle, June 22, 1778, died Decem- 
ber 27, 1851. They were the parents of the 
following children: Paul Green, Charles For- 
bush's father; Lurena, born April i, 1805, 
who became the wife of Jefferson Green; 
Sally, born June 24, 1809, who married Var- 
num Monroe ; Maria, born December 27, 
181 1, who married Thomas Green; George, 
born September 10, 1815, who married Har- 
riet A. Richardson, and died in March, 1865, 
leaving one son, George W. Forbush, of Dan- 
versport, Mass. ; and Louisa Electa, born No- 
vem.ber 17, 1821, who became the wife of 
Samuel E. Scott. 

Paul Green Forbush, who was born Novem- 
ber 22, 1 801, succeeded his father as owner 
of the farm, settling the claims of the other 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



heirs. Besides serving in a number of town 
offices, he was connected for some time with 
the militia, in which he rose from the rank of 
Ensign to that of Captain. He died April 
26, 1885, aged eighty-three years, five months, 
and four days. On April 2, 1835, he was 
united in marriage with Olive, daughter of 
Leonard and Olive (Estabrook) Green and a 
native of Carlisle. She died June 15, 1874, 
aged seventy-five years and five days. By her 
first husband, Samuel Green, she had two 
daughters: Lydia, who died unmarried in 
1874, aged fifty-six; and Sarah, who became 
the wife of John Q. A. Green, and died at 
the age of forty-six, leaving one daughter, A. 
Thankful. Her children by Mr. Forbush 
were: Olive L., born December 6, 1836, who 
died unmarried, January 4, 1885; Charles, 
the subject of this sketch; Joseph, born De- 
cember 14, 1841, who remained on the farm, 
never married, and died February 3, 1879; 
and Thankful Augusta, born December 30, 
1842, who was the wife of William A. 
Ingham, and died in August, 1866. 

Charles Forbush was educated in the 
schools of his native town. In 1862 he en- 
listed in Company G, Forty-seventh Massa- 
chusetts Regiment. Assigned to the Nine- 
teenth Army Corps, the regiment served for 
some time in the Army of the Gulf. He was 
about a year in the service. After his return 
he was in the grocery business for some time 
in Carlisle and from 1864 to 1878 in Lowell, 
Mass. In 1878 he moved to his present farm, 
which was the home of his father and grand- 
father. .He has made many radical improve- 
ments on the old estate. Originally contain- 
ing ninety acres, Mr. Forbush has added to it 
forty-five acres more. Also he has built an 
addition to the dwelling-house, and erected new 
fences and 'out-buildings. He is engaged in 
market gardening, dairying, and the raising 
of small fruits, employing two men for most 
of the time. He is the agent for two fire in- 
surance companies, and controls most of the 
insurance business in the town. For his ser- 
vices in the army he receives a pension. 

Mr. Forbush was married November 24, 
1864, to Emma L. , daughter of William A. 
and Emeline (Haynes) Edwards, of Bedford, 
Mass. She was born in Bedford, April 8, 



1846. Their union has been blessed with one 
child, Charles Ernest, born November 18, 
1865, who is now a fireman on the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. Mr. For- 
bush is one of ten Democrats in the town of 
Carlisle; and, though a stanch adherent to 
party principles, he is very popular with the 
other side, and has been elected to a number 
of offices by Republican votes. He has been 
chairman of the Board of Selectmen for the 
past two years; and he has served as Road 
Surveyor, Road- Superintendent, and Road 
Commissioner, being for the past ten years 
actively interested in the highways of the 
town. Also for the past four years he has 
been chairman of the Board of Overseers, and 
he has presided over meetings of the School 
Committee at different times. He is a com- 
rade of Old Concord Post, No. 180, G. A. R., 
of Concord, Mass. 



W: 



LLIAM M. BRUCE, a business 
man of Natick, Mass., has been for 
many years identified with the 
building and manufacturing interests of this 
town, at first as a carpenter and later as a box- 
maker. He was born February 4, 183 1, in 
Manchester, Guysboro County, N. S., a son of 
Christopher Bruce. As his name indicates, 
he is of honored Scotch ancestry, his paternal 
grandfather, James B. Bruce, having been 
born and bred in Scotland. James B. Bruce 
was for some years a soldier in the British 
army, and on receiving his discharge in Nova 
Scotia he was given a grant of land in that 
province, in the town of Manchester. There 
he engaged in clearing land and cultivating 
the soil until accidentally killed by a falling 
tree. 

His son, Christopher Bruce, succeeded to 
the homestead property in Nova Scotia, and, 
continuing in the occupation to which he was 
reared, made a good living for himself and 
family. He married Abigail McKeough, who 
was born in Manchester, N.S. Her father, 
John McKeough, served in the American Rev- 
olution, being probably a privateer most of 
the time, as he was in the navy. Landing in 
Nova Scotia on one of his trips, he was very 
much pleased with the excellent quality of the 




WILLIAM M. BRUCE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



soil, and at the close of the Revolution he 
settled with his family in the town of Antig- 
onish. Nine children were born to Christo- 
pher Bruce and his wife, five of whom are 
still living, as follows: James and Chris- 
topher, Jr., who occupy the old Bruce home- 
stead at Manchester, N.S. ; John, who lives 
near them ; Thomas, of Newton, Mass. ; and 
William M., the special subject of this 
sketch. 

William M. Bruce remained beneath the 
parental roof -tree until twenty-three years of 
age, when he came to the States, locating in 
Natick, April 14, 1854. This flourishing 
town was then but a small hamlet, and the 
first year or two of his sojourn here he suffered 
all the pangs of homesickness that ever beset 
a body in a strange land. He learned the car- 
penter's trade, and he worked at it for nearly 
thirty years with gratifying success, among 
the important buildings which were built 
under his supervision being the Morse Insti- 
tute, Winch's Block, and many of the finest 
residences in town, including those of G. W. 
Howe and F. E. Cummings. In 1880 he 
bought out a box-manufacturing plant, and, 
taking into partnership two of his sons, built 
up an extensive business, the largest of the 
kind in this vicinity, turning out eight hun- 
dred and eighty boxes of odd sizes daily. 

In politics Mr. Bruce is a straightforward 
Republican, and loses no opportunity to put 
in a little good work for the party. He is a 
strong advocate of temperance, and takes an 
active interest in advancing its cause. He 
has never swerved from the religious faith in 
which he was reared, and, following in the 
footsteps of his father, is a prominent worker 
in the Methodist Episcopal church, with 
which he united many years ago. He has 
most tender recollections of the place where 
he was reared and a strong love for the old 
homestead, which he visits every year on his 
vacation trips. He belongs to several secret 
organizations, among them the United Order 
of Pilgrim Fathers. 

Mr. Bruce was united in marriage Septem- 
ber 19, 1858, with Miss Mary S. Fiske, a 
sister of John M. Fiske. Four sons and one 
daughter were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bruce, 
namely: Frances A., who is the wife of 



Francis Babcock; Wilbur, who married Fanny 
Bryant; Charles, who married Miss Lillian 
Button, and is in business with his father; 
Harvey E., professor of music, now organist 
in the Auburndale Episcopal church, who 
pursued his studies successively at the Boston 
Conservatory under Professor Lang, with Pro- 
fessor Morse, of Auburndale, and Professor 
Chapman, after which he had charge of the 
music at the Troy Conference Academy in 
Poultney, Vt. ; and Adelbert M., who lives at 
home, and is preparing to enter Harvard Den- 
tal College. On the 23d of April, 1896, after 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce had been blessed with 
nearly thirty -eight years of wedded happiness, 
the angel of death crossed their threshold and 
bore away in his arms the loving wife and 
mother, leaving a grief-stricken household, in- 
deed, although to this day her beneficent in- 
fluence is closely felt. 

" Hands may clasp, and hands must sever, 

Symbols that a day endure ; 
But the hearts that live forever 

Hold each link of love secure. 
Life and all its cares besetting 
Shall not lure us to forgetting, 
But the living chain shall be 
Lengthened to eternity." 

Mrs. Sally M. Fiske, mother of Mrs. Bruce, 
died at the home of Mr. Bruce on January 7, 
1898, at the age of ninety-two years. 



/IJj^QRGE A. STEARNS, a highly re- 
\ p I spected and influential resident of 
Watertown, now retired from active 
business, was born in Boston, October 24, 
18 1 3, son of Simon and Sarah Ellis (Noyes) 
Stearns. His ancestor seven generations 
back, Isaac Stearns, an Englishman, accom- 
panied by his two brothers, came from Way-' 
land, Suffolk County, England, in 1630, with 
Governor Winthrop, Richard Saltonstall, and 
others. Isaac, one of the earliest settlers of 
Watertown, was there made a freeman in 
163 1. His son, Samuel, by his wife, Abigail 
(Fisk) Stearns, married Hannah Manning, of 
Cambridge, Mass., and had a family of several 
children. John, the seventh child of Samuel, 
was born in 1702. He married Anna Cool- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



idge, of Watertovvn; and Moses, great-grand- 
father of George A. Stearns, was his eldest 
child. Moses was born in Watertown in 1728, 
and moved to Walpole, N.H., in early life, 
becoming one of the pioneers of that town, 
and clearing a large tract of land. His wife's 
maiden name was Ruth Houghton. Ephraim, 
his son, born in 1775 in Westminster, spent 
the greater part of his life in Walpole, and 
followed the occupation of farmer. Ephraim 
was a man of high principles and much es- 
teemed, a Congregationalist in religious faith 
and a Deacon in the church for many years. 
He died at the age of eighty-eight years; and 
his wife, Mollie (Oilman) Stearns, died at 
the age of ninety. They had a family of ten 
children, all of whom reached maturity. 

Simon Stearns, eldest son of Ephraim, was 
born in Walpole. At the age of nineteen 
years, after driving a herd of cattle from that 
town to Boston, he obtained employment in a 
store of the latter place. Later he was in the 
West Indies business, which he followed for 
several years. He then engaged in the manu- 
facture and sale of potash and pearlash, which 
he continued up to three or four years before 
his death. He settled in Watertown in 1838, 
and purchased the old homestead, upon which 
his son, George A., is now living. He was 
very successful in business, winning the re- 
spect and entire confidence of the business 
public and the warm friendship of a large 
circle of personal friends. In politics he was 
a Republican and in religious belief a Uni- 
tarian. He died aged seventy-seven years. 
His wife, Sarah, a daughter of Joseph Noyes, 
of Boston, attained the age of eighty-seven. 
He had a family of four children, of whom 
George A. and Sarah N. are now living. 
Sarah, who is the widow of Luther F. Rich- 
ardson, late of Medford, Mass., has two chil- 
dren — Emma S. and Helen Frances, the 
latter now Mrs. Wilton B. Fay. The other 
two children of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Stearns 
— William H. and George William — died in 
infancy. 

George A. Stearns was a pupil of the famous 
Chauncy Hall School when it was located in 
Chauncy Place, under Professor Gideon F. 
Thayer. Leaving school, he went to work as 
clerk in his father's store. Later he became 



the book-keeper and still later a partner in 
the business, under the name of Simon Stearns 
& Son. After his father's death he conducted 
the business alone until the year 18S0, when 
he retired. He has been a resident of Water- 
town since 1843. 



/ pTEORGE P. KEITH, the superintend- 
\ JST ent of Dunn, Green & Co.'s exten- 

— sive tannery in Hudson, was born 
in Chelsea, Mass., October 15, 1862, son of 
Harrison A. and Mary (Richardson) Keith. 
The family was founded in America by a 
dissenting Scotch clergyman, who emigrated 
in 1630 and settled in Bridgewater, Mass. 

Harrison A. Keith was born in Easton, 
Mass., and educated at Antioch College, Yel- 
low Springs, Ohio, of which Horace Mann 
was at one time the president. After gradu- 
ating, he became the principal of the Quincy 
(Mass.) High School, a position that he occu- 
pied until 1 89 1, when he retired from educa- 
tional work. Later he was appointed City 
Clerk by Mayor Hodges, and subsequently 
served in that office for four years. After 
rendering valuable aid in perfecting the pub- 
lic-school system of Quincy as Committeeman- 
at-large, he declined a renomination. His 
wife, Mary, whom he first met while a student 
at Yellow Springs, is a daughter of Jacob 
Richardson, of Boston, Mass. She is the 
mother of two children: George P., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Arthur, who is a grad- 
uate of Harvard, class of 18S5. He was for- 
merly on the Massachusetts Topographical 
Survey, and is at present engaged in the 
United States Government Geological Survey. 

George P. Keith prepared for his collegiate 
course at the Adams Academy, Quincy, and 
was graduated from Harvard University in 
the class of 1883 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He was a member of his class crew 
and the university foot-ball team during his 
four years' course, and he took honors in the 
classics. In 1884 he entered the employ of 
Dunn, Green & Co. After remaining in their 
Boston store for two years, he was sent in 
1886 to Hudson as clerk of their establish- 
ment here. In i8gi he was appointed super- 
intendent of the factory, which employs an 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



average of one hundred and twenty-five men, 
and tans about sixty thousand hides per 
annum, valued at five hundred thousand dol- 
lars. The business, which was established 
some seventy-five years ago, is one of the old- 
est as well as one of the most important in- 
dustries in Hudson, and its present superin- 
tendent is amply qualified both by ability and 
experience to maintain the high reputation 
which it has acquired. 

Mr. Keith has served as secretary and chair- 
man of the Democratic Town Committee, and 
in 1896 he was chosen Selectman for three 
years. He is a Knight Templar, being a 
member of Doric Lodge, Houghton Chapter, 
and Trinity Commandery, in Hudson; and of 
Aleppo Temple of the Mystic Shrine, Boston. 
He wedded Mary A. Osborne, daughter of 
William A. and Mary (Fifield) Osborne, of 
Quincy. Taking an active and intelligent in- 
terest in all questions affecting the welfare of 
Hudson, especially in the work of the public 
schools, Mr. Keith has the confidence and 
esteem of his townspeople. 



/^HARLES F. HOLYOKE, the trea.s- 
I Vj-' urer of the Marlboro Savings Bank, 
V^^^^^ was born in this city, December 27, 
1855, son of Freeman and Henrietta 
A. (Brigham) Holyoke. He is a descendant 
of Edward Holyoke, an Englishman. Elizur 
Holyoke, son of Edward, emigrated to the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony, and wedded Mary 
Pynchon, daughter of the Rev. William Pyn- 
chon, of Roxbury, Mass. Elizur Holyoke 
(second), born October 12, 165 1, resided in 
Boston, where he followed the business of a 
soap-boiler and brazier. He served as a Se- 
lectman, Overseer of the Poor, and Constable, 
and was a man of considerable wealth and in- 
fluence. He died October 31, 171 1. Jacob 
Holyoke, son of Elizur (second), was born 
November 6, 1697, and married Susanna 
Martyn, of Boston. 

Elizur Holyoke, the great-grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, born in 1739, was 
the first of the family to settle in Marlboro. 
He was a member of Captain Barnes's com- 
pany, which marched to Cambridge on April 
'9' 1775; a"d he died in 1794. In 1775 he 



married Sarah, daughter of Silas and Eliza- 
beth (Bragg) Gates, of Marlboro. Captain 
William Holyoke, the grandfather of Charles 
F., was born in Marlboro, February 23, 1779. 
The active period of his life was devoted to 
agricultural pursuits. On April 19, 1814, he 
was commissioned Captain in the First Regi- 
ment, Second Brigade, Third Division of 
militia. He married Rebecca Howe, a 
daughter of Buckley and Elizabeth Howe and 
a descendant of John Howe, the first settler in 
Marlboro. ^ Freeman Holyoke, Charles F. 
Holyoke's father, was born in Marlboro, Au- 
gust 18, 18 18. In early life he was a carpen- 
ter, but eventually engaged in the meat and 
provision trade. His wife, Henrietta A., a 
daughter of William Pitt Brigham, of Marl- 
boro, became the mother of three children, 
namely: Charles F., the subject of this 
sketch; Frank H., who died aged eight years; 
and Adaline L., the wife of Walter P. Frye, 
of this city. 

Charles F. Holyoke was educated in the 
public schools. For a short time after finish- 
ing his studies he was employed in a shoe fac- 
tory. At the age of nineteen he went to San 
Francisco, Cal., where he resided for eight 
years, occupied for the greater part of the time 
in the position of assistant to a secretary of 
mining companies. On April 19, 1882, he 
was commissioned Captain of Company F, 
First Regiment, Second Brigade, of the Cali- 
fornia National Guards. In 1883 he returned 
to Marlboro, where he engaged in the insur- 
ance business; and in 1895 he formed a part- 
nership with Clifton B. Russell, under the 
firm name of Holyoke & Russell. This con- 
cern write all kinds of insurance, except life 
policies, and transact the largest fire and acci- 
dent business in the city. In politics Mr. 
Holyoke is a Republican. He was a member 
of the City Council in 1891. After his re- 
election in the following year, he resigned 
in order to accept the office of City Treas- 
urer. This office he held until he was ap- 
pointed treasurer of the Marlboro Savings 
Bank on January 10, 1895. He is a member 
of United Brethren Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of 
Houghton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Marlboro ; of Trinity Commandery, Knights 
Templar, of Hudson ; of Marlboro Lodge, No. 



276 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



85, I. O. O. F. , and King Saul Encampment; 
and he is the president of the Union Club. 

Mr. Holyoke married Blanche E. Corey, 
daughter of the late Thomas Corey, of Marl- 
boro. Mrs. Holyoke's father, born in Ireland 
in 1820, emigrated to the United States when 
eighteen years old. Settling in Marlboro, he 
learned shoemaking, and later engaged in 
manufacturing with the late Samuel Boyd, 
under the firm name of Boyd & Corey. After 
carrying on business for a number of years, he 
withdrew from the firm, and for some time 
was associated with C. B. Wilson in conduct- 
ing the American House, Boston. Upon his 
return to Marlboro he was again associated 
with Mr. Boyd, and afterward continued in 
the shoe manufacturing business until his 
death. He was one of the leading business 
men and public-spirited citizens of his day, 
and a director of the First National Bank. 
He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and attended the Universalist church. 
Thomas Corey married Eliza J., daughter of 
Mark Fay, of Marlboro, and reared three chil- 
dren: Edwin H. Corey, of New York City; 
Eliza E., the wife of Horace S. Crowell, of 
Newton, Mass. ; and Blanche E. , who is now 
Mrs. Holyoke. Mr. and Mrs. Holyoke are 
the parents of two sons — Thomas Corey Hol- 
yoke and Charles F. Holyoke, Jr. The fam- 
ily attend the Unitarian church. 



RATHANIEL CLARK was for many 
years a prominent and influential 
business man of Natick. Born Oc- 
*"~"^ tober 28, 1 80 1, in Foxboro, Mass., 
son of Deacon Nathaniel and Esther (Carpen- 
ter) Clark, highly respected residents of Fox- 
boro, he came of an old and honored family. 
The earlier years of his life were spent in his 
native town. From there he came to South 
Natick in 1826, having accepted the charge of 
the estate now known as the Hunnewell place. 
He remained there six years, in the meantime 
boarding with the mother of Leonard Winch, 
whose biography appears elsewhere in this 
volume. In 1832 he formed a copartnership 
with a Mr. Plympton, and opened a general 
merchandise store at Newton Upper Falls, 
where he conducted business four years as the 



junior member of the firm. The late Hon. 
John Welles, of Boston, and Major Fiske, of 
Natick, then induced him to open a similar 
establishment in the latter place. At that 
time he hired the old parish meeting-house of 
the Congregational church, fitted it up as a 
store and residence, aiid took possession of it 
on the first day of December, 1836. 

Natick was then a small hamlet, containing, 
all told, less than a dozen houses; and the 
mail, which made but a small package, was 
brought here on horseback from the little red 
house that still stands a mile or so north of 
the town. Mr. Clark carried on the business 
alone for about five years, and became the sec- 
ond Postmaster of the town, succeeding Will- 
iam Farris. On December i, 1841, he ad- 
mitted his former clerk, Leonard Winch, to 
an equal partnership. By mutual consent in 
1856 the firm was dissolved, Mr. Winch tak- 
ing the grocery department and Mr. Clark the 
dry goods. In the meantime the town had de- 
veloped with surprising rapidity, shoe manu- 
factories being established and other indus- 
tries being founded, the boom somewhat 
resembling that of a modern Western town. 
Mr. Clark's business increased to such an ex- 
tent that he took a partner, John Cleland. 
Later Mr. Cleland bought out the entire busi- 
ness, after which the senior partner spent the 
remainder of his life free from active cares. 
Mr. Clark built his attractive residence on 
Walnut Hill nearly half a century ago. He 
erected the large wooden block at the corner 
of Main and West Central Streets in 185 1, 
and in 1873 he put up a fine brick block in 
the business part of the village. Both of 
these were destroyed in the conflagration of 
January 13, 1874. Afterward, in company 
with his son Edward, he built the handsome 
structure known as Clark's Block, which con- 
tains a large and well-appointed concert hall. 

In early life Mr. Clark was identified with 
the Whig party, and he twice represented Na- 
tick in the State legislature. In 1861 he was 
elected Town Treasurer, a position which he 
faithfully filled for eighteen successive years. 
He also served in other offices of trust and re- 
sponsibility. He was one of the incorporators 
of the Natick Five Cents Savings Bank and 
subsequently the treasurer for fourteen years, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and he was interested in the establishment of 
the First National Bank of Natick. It is 
understood that he lent great aid in placing 
both of these well-known institutions on a 
sound financial basis. On December 31, 
1834, he married Miss Nancy Kingsbury 
Morse, of Wellesley, Mass., who passed away 
June 23, 1894, in the seventy-eighth year of 
her age. Of the children born of their happy 
union, Louisa and Edward Clark are living. 
Mr. Clark died at his home on Walnut Hill, 
June 18, 189s, when his age was ninety-three 
years, seven months, and twenty days. 



"ON. CHARLES L. BARTLETT, a 

former Mayor of Marlboro, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., July 20, 1851, son 
of Major and Amanda (Knapp) 
Bartlett. The paternal grandfather, Gershom 
Bartlett, was a prominent farmer of Norwich, 
Vt. A fine penman, he was much in demand 
for writing deeds, wills, etc., and he was a 
Justice of the Peace for many years. 

Major Bartlett was born in 1S07 in the 
same house that sheltered his son's infancy. 
When a boy he entered upon an apprenticeship 
at the tailor's trade, but on account of the ill 
health of his parents he was obliged to return 
home before he had fully mastered the craft, 
and take charge of the farm. This property 
was a large one, and not easily conducted. A 
man of retiring disposition, he had no desire 
for public office. He died August 17, 1S69. 
His wife was a daughter of Hezekiah Knapp, 
a native of Norwich, Vt. , who resided at 
different times in Rochester, N.Y., Hanover, 
N. H., and other towns of the Granite State. 
He served in nearly all the town offices of 
Norwich, and was Justice of the Peace for 
many years. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
They were the parents of twelve children, 
namely : Eleanor, now deceased, who was the 
wife of Chester L. Chamberlain, also de- 
ceased; Nelson, who resides in Norwich; 
William, a resident of Toledo, Ohio; Jane, 
deceased, who married Munroe Abbott; Har- 
riet, deceased; Wealthy, who died at the age 
of sixteen; Edson, deceased; Ann, who, to- 
gether with her husband, Levi Benson, is de- 



ceased; Adelaide, residing in Norwich, Vt. ; 
Frank, deceased, formerly of Proctor, Vt. ; 
Charles L. , the subject of this sketch; and 
Eva Maria, who lived but two years and a half. 

Charles L. Bartlett acquired a knowledge of 
the "three R's" in the district school of Nor- 
wich. Having left school when he was thir- 
teen years old, he worked at farming until his 
father's death, hiring out part of the time. 
On the night before Thanksgiving in 1S69 
he made his first visit to Marlboro, where he 
remained a short time. He spent the ensuing 
winter at home. In the spring, returning to 
Marlboro, he entered the employ of K. D. 
Childs, baker, with whom he remained over 
ten years. On October i, 1884, he started a 
bakery of his own, with only twenty dollars. 
After a time he had control of a large and 
prosperous business, which has amounted to 
as much as fifteen thousand dollars a year. 
He often referred with pride to his small be- 
ginning, and he used on his bill-heads "S. T. 
1884, XX," which means "Started trade in 
1884 with twenty dollars." In politics he 
was a Republican. He was a member of the 
first City Council in 1891 and 1892. In 1894 
he was on the Board of Aldermen. In 1895 
he was elected Mayor by a majority of two 
hundred and si.xty-three votes, and in 1896 he 
was re-elected by a majority of over two hun- 
dred. His administration of town affairs has 
been progressive, wise, and judicious. 

On May 5, 1875, Mr. Bartlett was married 
to Emily, daughter of Liberty Chadwick, of 
Framingham. The elder of his two children, 
Fred M., who was born March 9, 1877, is the 
acting general secretary of the Young Men's 
Christian Association at Maiden, Mass. The 
other, C. Lester, who was born February 10, 
1 88 1, is attending school. Mayor Bartlett 
was a member of United Brethren Lodge, F. 
& A. M., Houghton Chapter, and Trinity 
Commandery, of Hudson, Mass. ; of Mizpah 
Chapter, No. 29, of the Order of the Eastern 
Star; of the Improved Order of Red Men; 
and of Highland City Council, United Order 
of American Mechanics. Mrs. Bartlett is a 
member of the Orthodox Congregational 
church, and he contributed liberally to its 
support, and frequently attended service. He 
died April 8, 1898. 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



R. CHARLES BULLOCK, dentist, 
of Cambridge, the inventor and 
patentee of an inhaler for the ad- 
ministration of nitrous oxide gas, 
and promoter of other improvements in practi- 
cal dentistry, was born in Providence, R.I., 
March i6, 1836. His parents were Cyril and 
Betsey (Perry) Bullock. On the paternal side 
the first representative of his family in this 
country was Richard Bullock, who was born 
in Essex County, England, about 1623, and 
died in Rehoboth, Mass., in 1667. He was 
married August 4, 1647, to Elizabeth Ingra- 
ham, who bore him ten children. Thomas 
Bullock, son of Daniel and a lineal descend- 
ant of Richard, was born in Rehoboth in 
1767, and lived to be almost a centenarian. 
He was twice married. His first wife, Martha 
Peck, was the mother of Cyril, Dr. Bullock's 
father. 

Cyril Bullock was born April 30, 1790, and 
passed his early youth in Rehoboth, his native 
town. He afterward lived in Pawtucket and 
Providence, R.I., following the wood-turner's 
trade. His wife was the daughter of Ezra 
Perry, Jr., of Rehoboth, who belonged to a 
family of English origin that was settled in 
this country at an early date. Cyril and 
Betsey (Perry) Bullock reared a family of 
ten sons and two daughters: Charles, who 
died young; Laban ; William; Daniel; Al- 
bert; George; Cyrill ; George (second); 
Cyrus; Charles, the subject of this sketch; 
Nancy; and Betsey. 

Charles Bullock attended school in Canton, 
Mass., where he lived from his fifth to his 
thirteenth year, and later in Boston and in 
Worcester, Mass. At the age of fifteen he 
began to learn to make firearms in the manu- 
factory of Allen & Thurber in Worcester. 
He was afterward employed for some time in 
making machine tools used in the manu- 
facture of pistols. He eventually entered 
the office of his brother, Dr. Cyrill Bullock, 
of Hartford, Conn., and took up the study of 
dentistry. Two years later he went to Col- 
linsville. Conn., to practise dentistry and 
continue the study of medicine. In 1859 he 
opened an office in Cambridge, at the corner 
of Main and Norfolk Streets; and he was so 
successful in his professional work that he 



was shortly enabled to buy the building on 
Main Street, opposite Pearl Street. It was 
while he was in active practice that he in- 
vented the nitrous oxide gas inhaler, which 
found great favor among dentists throughout 
the country. Previous to the production of 
this invention the gas was breathed over and 
over again from a rubber bag. Another of 
his inventions is a patent process for oxidiz- 
ing alcoholic liquors. He continued to prac- 
tise until 1 891, when he disposed of his busi- 
ness to his partner. Dr. A. J. Sawyer. On 
retiring from professional work. Dr. Bullock 
became interested in the manufacture of car 
wheels at Allston, Mass., and was treasurer 
of the company. He has turned his knowl- 
edge of mechanics to account in the invention 
of rotary engines. He is likewise interested 
in the Gushing Process Company, of which 
he is treasurer. 

He was married in 1859 to Mary A. 
Squires, daughter of Sanford and Betsey Eliz- 
abeth (Green) Squires, of Stafford, Conn. 
The home of Dr. and Mrs. Bullock is bright- 
ened by an adopted daughter, Eva Marion. 
In politics Dr. Bullock is a Republican. In 
the early days of the Cambridge Electric 
Light Company he was its president. He 
was Overseer of the Poor eight years, and was 
on the Board of Aldermen one year. As a 
Mason he is a member of Mizpah Lodge, F. & 
A. M. ; Cambridge Royal Arch Chapter; and 
Boston Commandery, K. T. He belongs 
also to the Newtowne Club and the Cam- 
bridge Social Club. He is a member of the 
Third Universalist Church, and was on the 
Building Committee when they built the pres- 
ent edifice. 



IMON MULLIGAN, a highly re- 
spected citizen of ' Natick, Mass., 
has had a varied experience in life, 
and in his many undertakings has 
generally met with success. He was born 
March i, 1S25, in Boston, Mass., a son of 
Thomas and Mary Ann (Carson) Mulligan. 

While in the prime of a vigorous young 
manhood Mr. Mulligan was attracted to the 
valley of the Sacramento by the glowing re- 
ports of its auriferous soil, and, joining the 




CHARLES BULLOCK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tide of emigration that was hastily pushing its 
way to the Pacific coast, became one of the 
immortal "forty-niners." Taking passage on 
the clipper "Argonaut," he had a remarkably 
quick trip of one hundred and forty days, via 
Cape Horn, to San Francisco. Proceeding to 
the diggings, he was engaged chiefly in wash- 
ing out the shining mineral with the pan. 
After a few months of this labor, however, he 
returned to San Francisco, and thence went to 
Sacramento, deeming, that a better place to 
start in business. He established the "Bos- 
ton Restaurant," the first eating-house opened 
in that city, and conducted it successfully 
until late in the year 1850, when he was 
stricken with fever. Before he had fully re- 
covered, the terrible scourge of cholera broke 
out among the emigrants; and he, persuaded 
that discretion was the better part of valor, 
started for hom.e, coming by way of Panama, 
where he crossed the mountains on a mule and 
went down the Chagres River in a dugout. 
On returning to Natick, Mr. Mulligan 
opened a restaurant in Walcott Block, and car- 
ried on a substantial business until after the 
breaking out of the late Civil War. When 
the call came for more troops he promptly 
offered his services to his country, and was 
soon commissioned First Lieutenant of Com- 
pany I, Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteer 
Infantry, which was sent to Washington, and 
was placed on picket duty between Washing- 
ton and Ball's Bluff. The winter of 1862 and 
1863 his regiment was encamped at Pooles- 
ville, and he was doing picket and guard duty 
at Conrad's Ferry, being stationed also for a 
time with his comrades at Edwards Ferry to 
prevent cavalry raids across the river. From 
April, 1863, until July 9, the same year, Mr. 
Mulligan had command of the guard at the 
War Department in Washington and of the 
night patrol. He was afterward sent to Mary- 
land Heights and thence to Harper's Ferry, 
where he was taken sick with a fever and 
ordered back to the hospital at Washington. 
At the end of sixty days the examining sur- 
geon pronounced him unfit for duty, and he 
was honorably discharged for disability. He 
weighed but one hundred and twenty-three 
pounds when he came home, and was sick for 
a year afterward. As soon as able he re- 



sumed business in Natick, continuing until 
1892, when he retired from active cares. He 
is now spending his closing years in a well- 
earned leisure. 

In politics Mr. Mulligan was first a Whig, 
then a Republican during the war, and since 
its close he has affiliated mostly with the 
Democrats. He was a candidate for the State 
legislature in 1863. He is a member of 
Meridian Lodge, F. & A. M., and a charter 
member of General Wadsworth Post, No. 63, 
G. A. R. 

In 1852 Mr. Mulligan married Miss Al- 
maria Coolidge, daughter of Alexander Cool- 
idge, a pioneer shoe manufacturer of Natick 
and a man highly esteemed for his many ster- 
ling qualities. Mrs. Mulligan died January 
15, 1887, leaving three children — Cora M., 
Henry C., and Anna L. Henry C. Mulligan 
was fitted for college at Adams Academy in 
Ouincy, and in 1879 ^^s graduated from Har- 
vard as orator of his class. He was subse- 
quently graduated from the Harvard Law 
School, and, on being admitted to the bar, he 
opened an office in Natick and one in Boston. 
He has since built up an extensive practice, 
and has won distinction among his profes- 
sional brethren, being known as a rising 
young attorney of signal ability. He is now 
serving as Trial Justice at Natick, a position 
to which he was appointed by the late Gov- 
ernor Russell. He is active in local affairs, 
having served as an Attorney for the town and 
Selectman, also for several years as chairman 
of the School Committee and a trustee of the 
Morse Institute. Judge Mulligan married 
in December, 1886, Miss Minna Rawson, of 
Worcester. They have three children, 
nam.ely: Ralph C. , born March 15, 1888; 
Ruth, born August 23, 1890; and Alice G., 
March 11, 1892. 



fC- 



OYT W. HILTON, who, having car- 
ied on a large mercantile business 
in Lowell for a long period, has 
lived practically retired for some 
years at North Tewksbury, is a native of 
Sandwich, Carroll County, N. H., born Au- 
gust 30, 1 8 14. His parents were David and 
Sarah (Wallace) Hilton, both of whom were 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born in the Granite State. David Hilton was 
a carpenter. At the age of sixteen young 
Hilton left his home and went to Great Falls, 
N. H., where he began his business career as 
a clerk in a dry-goods store. Three years 
later he set up in business with two other 
young men, Benjamin Gerrish and Charles 
Dore. These latter had just started a dry- 
goods store; and as he had good credit he was 
received into equal partnership, with three 
thousand dollars invested. He was given 
charge of the business; and he carried it on 
until January, 1839, when, in company with 
Mr. Gerrish, he came to Lowell and started 
on a larger scale. They were very successful. 
In about eight years Mr. Gerrish retired, and 
was succeeded by John O. Benthal. About 
1858 the style of the firm became H. W. Hil- 
ton & Co., which was retained as long as Mr. 
Hilton remained in the business, though 
there were several changes in the fcrsonnel. 
At the time of Mr. Hilton's retirement, in 
1^75, the firm had become one of the largest 
dry-goods houses in the city, and was doing a 
business of from seventy-five to one hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars annually. 

Mr. Hilton was a pioneer in the plan of 
consolidating small stores into fewer large 
stores. In addition to the Lowell store, he 
had one in Lawrence, Mass., and one in 
Centre Harbor, N.H. It was understood by 
the clerks in his employ that faithful service 
would be rewarded by promotion and reception 
into partnership, and some of them now carry 
on the business. When he retired from mer- 
cantile life, it lacked but four years of a half- 
century from the beginning of his business 
career. Though there were some heavy 
losses, he was always able to pay his debts, 
and the final statement showed a good balance 
on the right side of the ledger. During the 
Civil War he and others were engaged in the 
manufacture of heavy woollens at Meredith, 
N.H., under the firm name of Hilton, Mar- 
shall & Co. At one time he did a successful 
real estate business in Lowell ; and since he 
came to Tewksbury, in 1872, he has been 
interested in real estate improvements, etc. 
For the greater part of the time he was in 
business in Lowell he made his home in Cen- 
tralville, across the river; and many of the 



improvements made there during that period 
were, in part, effected through his influence. 

On January 24, 1838, Mr. Hilton was mar- 
ried at Sutton, Vt., to Miss Mary J. Wood- 
man. Her father, the Rev. Jonathan Wood- 
man, who was pastor of the Baptist church at 
Great Falls for four years, spent his last years 
with her here in Tewksbury. Mr. Hilton and 
his wife have been the parents of six children, 
namely: Lucius W., living in North Cam- 
bridge, Mass., who served in the commissary 
department during the Civil War, and is now 
employed in the custom-house; Orrin N., a 
resident of Denver, Col., who is an attorney- 
at-law and an ex-judge; George V., who is a 
successful medical practitioner in Chicago, 
111. ; Albertus Allen, now in Central Amer- 
ica, whose home is at Kansas City, Mo.; 
Mary C, who died in December, 1896, and 
was the wife of the Rev. Eugene E. Thomas, 
of Castleton, N.Y. ; and Alice, the only 
daughter living, who is the wife of Dr. Harry 
Coburn, of Lowell. In politics Mr. Hilton 
has always been a Republican. In years past 
he was active in political matters, and he 
served at times in offices of the Lowell city 
government. For a score of years he was 
vice-president of the Merchants' Bank. At 
first he joined the First F"ree Baptist Church 
of Great Falls. On removing to Lowell, he 
transferred his membership to the Baptist 
church in that city, and for upward of forty 
years held in it the office of Deacon = 



©TIS C. BUCK, who carried on a pros- 
perous butchering' business in Wil- 
mington for many years, was born in 
this town, December 18, 1825, son of 
Nathan and Abigail (Clark) Buck. His 
grandfather, Nathan Buck (first), was an in- 
dustrious farmer and a lifelong resident of 
Wilmington, and had a family of four sons 
and three daughters. The father was a native 
of this town. When a young man he served 
an apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade, 
which he followed during his active years. 
He lived to be ninety years old. His wife, 
Abigail, who was a native of Milford, N.H., 
and a daughter of Richard and Abigail Clark, 
became the mother of six children, one of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



283 



whom died in childhood. The survivors are: 
Abigail, the widow of Brooks Tay; Nathan 
Edwin, of whom there is no special record; 
Otis C, the subject of this sketch; Susan C, 
the widow of Horace Sheldon; and Emily 
Maria, the wife of James Skilton. 

Otis C. Buck passed his boyhood in attend- 
ing the district school and assisting his father 
at the shoemaker's trade. When twenty-one 
years old he engaged in butchering, which he 
followed prosperously until his retirement. 
He has rendered valuable service to the town 
as a Selectman for several terms. For six 
y£ars he was an Assessor and Overseer of the 
Poor. Both in public affairs and in his pri- 
vate business enterprises he displayed much 
energy and ability. 

Mr. Buck has iDcen twice married. By his 
first union, which was contracted with Esther 
Gowing, who was a native of Amherst, N. H., 
there was one daughter, Esther Elizabeth, 
now the wife of Edward M. Nichols. His 
second wife, who was before marriage Caro- 
line R. Howard, of North Reading, is the 
mother of seven children; namely, Arthur 
Otis, Caroline Frances, Alma Quimby, Will- 
iam Clark, Emily Maria, Helen Howard, and 
Francene A. 



fONATHAN BOWERS, founder of Wil- 
low Dale, the unique and popular 
picnic ground of Tyngsboro, was born 
March 2, 1S25, a son of Jonathan, Sr., 
arid Anna (Coburn) Bowers. The house in 
which he first saw the light stood on Paw- 
tucket Street, near the Vesper boat-house, in 
what is now Lowell. His grandfather, Luke 
Bowers, was born on School Street, near Pen- 
tucket Bridge, the house standing in what 
is now the garden of the Fred Ayres place. 
Luke Bowers entered the Revolutionary army 
as a volunteer at the age of sixteen, and 
served seven years. He married Anna Pratt. 
Jonathan Bowers, Sr., with his brother 
James, was in business for a number of years, 
dealing in lumber, brick, lime, and cement. 
They invested largely in real estate when 
Lowell was young, and realized handsomely 
on their property. At one time they owned 
from Wanalansett Street to Walker Street on 



one side and from the Vesper boat-houses to 
the ice-houses on the other side, extending 
back nearly to Walker Street. Jonathan 
Bowers, Sr., died December 18, 1848, aged 
fifty-nine. His wife died January 29, 1870, 
aged seventy-seven. They had lived for 
many years in the part of Lowell then called 
Chelmsford. Their family consisted of: Jon- 
athan, the subject of this sketch ; George, who 
died in Texas in 1859, aged thirty-three; and 
Sarah Ann, who died November 16, 1854, 
aged nineteen. 

As a boy Jonathan Bowers, the subject of 
this sketch, was unusually bright and indus- 
trious. While attending school in Lowell he 
showed a natural bent for mechanics and an 
artistic taste. At the age of fourteen he 
made a sword cane, now preserved by his fam- 
ily, inlaid with silver and pearl, the handle 
richly carved and the cane holding a blade. 
He also made two beautifully gilded picture 
frames. When a student in the high school, 
he made a table inlaid with pearl, shells, and 
ivory, containing at least twenty thousand 
pieces. This table, which is highly polished 
and shows a remarkable degree of patience and 
skill, has taken premiums at a number of 
fairs ; and Mr. Bowers was at one time offered 
one thousand dollars for it. A work-room 
was early fitted up for him in his father's 
house; and when he was a young man his 
father built him a large shop, and he engaged 
in the manufacture of carriages, wheelbarrows, 
and other vehicles. He established an exten- 
sive business, and employed a large number 
of men. 

Mr. Bowers inherited a fortune from his 
parents; and in 1857 he purchased the "King 
David Butterfield " property at Willow Dale 
on Tyngsboro Pond, or, to use the Indian 
name, Maskuppitt Lake. Sparing no ex- 
pense, he began to make improvements; and 
his artistic taste was a valuable factor in con- 
verting the place into a beautiful picnic 
ground. In a short time it became a popular 
resort for Lowell people, and brought a hand- 
some income, much of which he expended in 
further improvements. He laid out walks and 
roads, and built boat-houses, making the place 
an ideal park. A unique feature is the re- 
markable collection of statuary. 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In one of the dance halls is the famous 
wooden image of President Jackson, which was 
the figure-head of the frigate "Constitution" 
at the time of Jackson's fight against the Bank 
of the United States. The "Constitution" 
was then being repaired in Charlestown navy- 
yard, and the business men of Boston rebelled 
against its being ornamented with a figure of 
Jackson. The statue was finished, however, 
under a guard of marines, and placed securely 
on the frigate, which was guarded by two 
other vessels; but a daring young Cape Cod 
mariner, Captain Samuel Dewey, going out in 
a boat on a stormy night, decapitated the 
figure. He afterward took the head to Wash- 
ington, and Jackson laughed heartily at it. 
In some way the head eventually got back to 
the body, and Mr. Bowers discovered the 
statue in a junk shop, and rescued it from 
oblivion. Some other statues at Willow Dale 
look as if they might have ornamented the 
grounds of "Lord Timothy Dexter" at New- 
buryport. There are two handsome steamers 
on the lake for the use of excursionists. 

In 1870 Mr. Bowers built "Wanalansett 
Castle," on Wanalansett Hill, Lowell. The 
structure cost some thirty thousand dollars, 
and is one of the handsomest residences in 
Lowell. It is now known as Bowers's Castle. 
Mr. Bowers planned the house, which has a 
special staircase extending from the bottom to 
the top, a circular library room, and other 
rooms of peculiar shape — oval, oblong, etc. 
It is finished in black walnut, and was filled 
with rare paintings, statues, and other treas- 
ures of art. He lived there from October to 
June until about 1883, when he made the 
"King David" house at Tyngsboro his perma- 
nent home. Here he died December 28, 
1894, of paralysis. 

Mr. Bowers, who was a Republican, was a 
member of the Common Council of Lowell in 
1846, 1853, and 1854. He was an intimate 
friend of the late Governor Greenhalge, who 
spent many pleasant hours with him at Willow 
Dale. Mr. Bowers had travelled extensively, 
but was best content in the bosom of his fam- 
ily. He was of frank and genial disposition, 
and had a host of friends. 

On December 25, 1850, he was united in 
marriage with Sarah, daughter of Thomas and 



Mary (Brown) Varnum, of old Concord, Mass. 
She was a descendant of Samuel Varnum, 
of Dracut; and her brother Thomas is the 
seventh Thomas Varnum who has lived at the 
old homestead in that town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bowers had two daughters, Minnie and Kittie, 
and two sons, Jonathan and George. Minnie 
is the wife of Frank E. Jewett, of Lowell, 
and has four children — Bernice, Victor, Har- 
old, and Gladys. Jonathan (Johnnie) married 
Alice McNabb, and has two children — Jona- 
than Chester and Varnum. George, who lives 
in the old home, married Anna Vining, and 
has two children — Madeline and George, Jr. 
Mr. Bowers's sons — Johnnie and George — 
now manage Willow Dale, and are no less 
popular than was their father. Their mother 
passed away December 31, 1897. 



AVID HALL, late a well-known and 
respected resident of Newton, was 
born in this town, September 28, 
1 82 1, son of David and Eunice P. 
(Alden) Hall. His paternal grandfather was 
Solomon Hall, a native of Needham, Mass., 
and the original settler of the Hall farm in 
Newton. David Hall, son of Solomon, was 
born in the year 1792. He succeeded to his 
father's property, which he cultivated during 
his active years. 

David Hall, the subject of this sketch, was 
educated in the district school, and was en- 
gaged in farming from his youth. For twelve 
years he supplied milk to patrons in Roxbury, 
Mass., following a regular route, but the 
greater part of his life was spent at the home- 
stead on Nahanton Street, Oak Hill, where 
he has conducted general farming, market 
gardening, and dairying, and for some years 
previous to his death disposed of his milk at 
wholesale in Brookline. He died February 
3, 1898, and was buried in the family lot in 
Newton Cemetery. 

In 1849 Mr. Hall married Elizabeth Burt, 
who was born in Freetown, Mass., in 1818, 
daughter of Benjamin and Sinia (Winslow) 
Burt. Her mother was a daughter of Joseph 
Winslow and a descendant of a brother of 
Governor Edward Winslow, the "Mayflower" 
Pilgrim. Mr. and Mrs. Hall had three chil- 



&^-: .* "^ ''\j. 







DAVID HALL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2S7 



dren, namely: Mary Elizabeth, born in 185 1, 
who is now the wife of William A. Sanderson, 
of Newton; Arthur D., who was born in 1854, 
and married Maria A. Wiswall; and Charles 
F., who was born in 1858, and married Etta 
L. Wiswall. 

In politics Mr. Hall was a Republican, and, 
though never an aspirant for public ofifice, he 
served for a number of years as Surveyor of 
Streets, and took an active interest in the 
growth and development of Newton. 



"ON. LUMAN T. JEFTS, for many 
years a distinguished citizen of Hud- 
son, Mass., was born at Washing- 
ton, N.H., on April 4, 1830, son 
of Benjamin and Olive (Reed) Jefts. The 
father, Benjamin, a farmer, son of David 
Jefts, went to Washington, N. H., in 1824, 
and the following year married the daughter 
of Joel Reed. The family lived in Washing- 
ton until the death of Mrs. Jefts on July i, 
1849, after which Benjamin Jefts removed to 
Springfield, Vt. Later he removed to Al- 
stead, and his death occurred in that town on 
March 3, 1861. The children of Benjamin 
and Olive Jefts were: George S. , born Feb- 
ruary 8, 1826; Benjamin F. ; Luman T., the 
subject of our sketch; and Cynthia E. 

The career of Luman T. Jefts was an ex- 
ample of what may be accomplished by a man 
guided by high moral principle, starting with- 
out money but possessed of a sturdy ambition 
to succeed and make his mark in life. His 
educational opportunities were confined to the 
district schools of his native town until he 
reached the age of seventeen years, when he 
had one term of schooling away from home. 
So earnest was he for higher learning that he 
obtained his father's permission to attend the 
academy at Francestown, providing he would 
pay his own way while pursuing his studies. 
This he did by teaching and doing various 
other work, the time thus occupied being 
about six years. Soon after leaving school he 
became clerk in a grocery store at Marlboro 
at a salary of three hundred dollars a year. 
He remained in that place about a year, and 
then entered a grocery store at Assabet, now 
Maynard. Still later he was in a store at 



Feltonville as clerk for Brigham & Peters, 
teaching school, however, during the day and 
attending to his duties as clerk evenings. In 
1859, at the age of twenty-nine, having suc- 
ceeded in saving a small amount of money, 
he formed a partnership with A. K. Graves, 
of Hudson, then Feltonville, and embarked in 
a small way in the shoe business. Several 
years later he assumed full control of the busi- 
ness, which under his management increased 
steadily in proportions until it reached an 
annual output of two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand pairs of shoes. 

A man of Mr. Jefts's remarkable executive 
ability and rare business talents could not 
escape public notice; and, his high qualities 
once recognized, he became a most desirable 
candidate for public ofifice. In 1882 he was 
elected by the Republicans as Representative 
to the General Court from the Thirty-third 
Middlesex District. In 1885-86 he was 
elected Senator from the Fifth Middlesex 
District by a handsome majority, and while 
in the Senate served on the Committees on 
Liquor Laws, Public Charitable Institutions, 
and Manufactories. In 1887 in the Senate 
he served on the several committees as chair- 
man. In 1893 and 1894 he was a member of 
the Governor's Council. Mr. Jefts was a 
prominent member of the Republican State 
Committee for many years. Had not his 
health required him to retire from public life, 
he would doubtless have reached even higher 
civic distinction. 

Mr. Jefts travelled extensively during the 
last fifteen or twenty years of his life, both in 
the United States and in foreign countries. 
This experience made him a man of wide in- 
formation and of extended sympathies. He 
delighted to use the fruits of his industry and 
intelligence in deeds of public and private 
beneficence. To Washington, N. H., his na- 
tive town, he gave a handsome public library, 
and about the same time he erected a fine and 
commodious parsonage as a gift to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Society in Hudson. He 
served the New England Conservatory of 
Music as trustee and as treasurer, and in it 
founded a perpetual scholarship fund by the 
gift of five thousand dollars. Not many 
months before his death he gave an equal 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sum for a scholarship in Boston University. 
"His own hard experiences in early life," it 
has been well said, "qualified him to appre- 
ciate the need of such foundations; and his 
generous spirit prompted him to effort and 
self-sacrifice, that he might make the path of 
other unprivileged youth less arduous and dis- 
couraging than his own had been." Mr. 
Jefts was trustee of the Sterling Methodist 
Episcopal Camp-grounds Association and of 
the Chautauquan Association at Lakeview, 
Framingham. He had been president of the 
Hudson National Bank since it was estab- 
lished, and was first president of the Hudson 
Co-operative Bank. He was also vice-presi- 
dent, trustee, and member of the Investment 
Committee of the Hudson Savings Bank. He 
was a large owner of real estate, his prop- 
erty including his shoe factory, two business, 
blocks on Main Street, dwelling-houses, a 
large farm, and his palatial brick mansion 
erected about eight years ago on Pleasant 
Street. His tax was the largest in the town. 

Mr. Jefts was married on December lo, 
1856, to Miss Emily S. Witt, who bore him 
four children. Only one of these is living, 
Abbie S., now Mrs. Frank T. Beede. Mr. 
Jefts was a man of deep religious nature. He 
was prominently identified with the affairs of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church of Hudson, 
serving as superintendent of its Sunday-school 
and class leader for many years. The beauti- 
ful church organ used in the church was one 
of his many gifts to it. He was affiliated 
with a number of secret societies, being a 
member of Doric Lodge, F. & A. M., and of 
Houghton Royal Arch Chapter; Past Com- 
mander of Trinity Commandery, K. T. ; a 
member of Hudson Grange, P. of H. ; of Raw- 
son Council, No. 963, R. A.; and of the Mid- 
dlesex and Worcester Farmers' and Mechan- 
ics' Association, 

Mr. Jefts died at his home on July 3, 1896, 
after a lingering illness of two years. The 
trustees of Boston University, in making 
their tribute to his memory, said: "Begin- 
ning life in humble circumstances, he was at 
thirty years of age a thriving manufacturer, 
at fifty-two a member of the Massachusetts 
legislature, at fifty-five a Senator, at fifty- 
seven chairman of several of the most impor- 



tant of the committees of the General Court, 
at sixty -three a member of the Governor's 
Council. . , . We this day honor, and long 
will honor, a noble man, an eminent citizen, 
an exemplary husband and father, a ripe 
Christian, a public benefactor, a lamented 
friend." 



,ARTIN RICE, a worthy and re- 
spected citizen of Natick, Mass., 
is now living retired from active 
pursuits, enjoying a leisure well 
merited by virtue of his many years of enter- 
prising industry. He was born June 18, 
1824, in Framingham, Mass., being a son of 
Martin Rice, Sr., and the second child in a 
family of eight brothers and sisters. He 
comes of long lines of excellent Colonial an- 
cestry. 

Deacon Edmund Rice, the founder of the 
family to which he belongs, emigrated from 
Berkbamstead, England, to Massachusetts in 
1639. He settled in that part of Sudbury 
now included within the limits of Wayland, 
where he took up a grant of land that remained 
in the possession of his descendants until 
within a few years. The house that he built 
thereon stood until 1896. 

Martin Rice came with his parents to Na- 
tick when he was a lad of eleven years. The 
village was then small, containing very few 
dwellings; and but one school teacher was em- 
ployed in the place of the forty now needed to 
carry on the educational work of the town. 
Reared to habits of industry, he began work- 
ing as soon as he arrived here, obtaining em- 
ploym.ent at braiding straw or in pegging and 
closing shoes, at which he continued seven or 
eight years with the exception of winters, 
when he studied hard at his books. The sec- 
ond winter that he lived in Natick his teacher 
was Henry Wilson, who at a later period be- 
came vice-president of the United States. 
Mr. Rice subsequently served an apprentice- 
ship at the carpenter's trade, and for forty 
years of his active life was in business for 
himself as a contractor and builder. From 
1850 until 1866 he was senior member of the 
firm of Rice & Thompson, but after that time 
he was alone. He built many public build- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ings and residences, and in 1868 he embarked 
in a new venture, buying a half -acre of land 
on Main Street, on which he erected build- 
ings of various kinds, the largest being the 
Rice Block. From these he drew a good in- 
come until they were swept away by the dis- 
astrous fire of 1874. He subsequently re- 
placed them by others equally good, and on 
Central Street erected a number which he 
still owns. He then bought a tract of land 
containing several acres at the corner of 
Marion Street and North Avenue, platted it, 
sold many desirable building lots, and on 
others built substantial residences, one of 
which he occupies, while his son-in-law, H. 
Carleton Smith, lives in an adjoining one. 

Mr. Rice has always taken an interest in 
town and county affairs, but has steadily re- 
fused all public office. He has affiliated with 
the Republican party since its formation, in- 
variably doing his duty at the polls since cast- 
ing his first Presidential vote in favor of 
Martin Van Buren. He belongs to various 
insurance orders, is a teetotaler, and for many 
years was an officer and earnest worker in 
local temperance organizations. For a full 
half-century he has been a faithful member of 
the Congregational church ; and he was for- 
merly active in the Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Rice was married January 19, i860, to 
Miss Mary C. Pray, of Farmington, N.H. 
They have three children, namely: Fred 
Martin, who was graduated from Williams 
College and has since been engaged in teach- 
ing, for the past nine years having been prin- 
cipal of the Allen School in New York City; 
Flora Bessie, who completed her education in 
the Ouincy Training School and is now a 
teacher in Somerville, Mass. ; and Mabel, 
wife of H. Carleton Smith, for many years in 
a cattle commissioner's office, but now en- 
gaged in business in Boston as a chemist. 
The son, Fred Martin Rice, married Miss 
Abbie Randall, of Hampstead, N.H. 



ORDON PARKER.— Abraham Parker 
was one of five brothers who came 
from England about 1630, and set- 
tled in Charlestown. When Charlestown 
village was planted, they obtained grants, and 



were among the first settlers of what is now 
Woburn. Abraham married Rose Whitlock, 
November 18, 1644, and was taxed in Wo- 
burn, September 8, 1645, which was, accord- 
ing to Sewall's History, "the first tax for the 
country on record." His homestead was lo- 
cated on Standfast Street, what is now Misha- 
wum Road, and near the junction of Middle 
Street. In 1655 he with others migrated 
into the wilderness, and settled Chelmsford. 
He spent the remainder of his days in that 
town, dying there in 1685. His descendants 
settled Westford, Groton, and Pepperell, in 
Middlesex, and Bradford and Groveland in 
Essex. 

Gordon Parker is a descendant in the eighth 
generation from Abraham Parker, one of the 
founders of the town, and he resides almost 
within a stone's throw of the original home- 
stead of his ancestor. He is also a descend- 
ant on his mother's side from Thomas and 
Valentine Rowell, father and son, who came 
from England early in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, and settled in Amesbury. In the same 
line he is seventh in descent from Hannah 
Dustin, the Haverhill heroine, who was capt- 
ured by the Indians, and who subsequently 
killed her captors, escaping with ten scalps, 
for which the Colony of Massachusetts Bay 
gave her a handsome bounty. She is the only 
woman who has been honored with two public 
monuments, one in Haverhill, Mass., and an- 
other at Contoocook, N.H. 

Gordon Parker was born in Woburn, July 
II, 1858. His parents were Ebenezer and 
Elsie Lord (Rowell) Parker, their home being 
what is now 528 Main Street, near Franklin. 
Gordon and his sister, Susan Flint Parker, are 
the only descendants of Abraham Parker now 
living in Woburn. His mother died in Phil- 
adelphia, August II, 1862, while on a visit 
to his eldest brother, who was in the hospital 
recovering from wounds received in battle. 
Gordon, being but four years old, received the 
motherly care of his elder sister Elsie Jane; 
and until her death, which occurred February 
21, 1878, she never ceased to regard him as 
her boy. He went to the common schools, 
passing through all the grades, and graduat- 
ing from the high school in the class of 1876. 
In 1873 he entered the drug store of George 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S. Dodge, and while attending school em- 
ployed his spare moments in acquiring a 
knowledge of pharmacy. He entered Am- 
herst College in the class of 1881, and for 
two years pursued his studies with a view to 
entering the medical profession, but finally 
decided to adopt pharmacy, for which he was 
already very well prepared. He practised it 
in Boston, Holbrook, and Brockton, and in 
the latter city he began business for himself. 
One of the first things he did in his new ca- 
pacity was to establish an emergency-room in 
connection with his drug store; and this was 
the initial movement toward a public hospital 
for the city of Brockton. In 1891 an oppor- 
tunity offered for the purchase of a drug store 
in Woburn, and he bought the store on the 
corner of Main and Walnut Streets, where he 
has been ever since. For some months he 
carried on stores in both Brockton and Wo- 
burn, but he finally disposed of his Brockton 
interest; and, once more becoming a citizen 
of the place of his birth and ancestry, he has 
since devoted his attention to the Woburn 
store, and has built up a business that entitles 
him to be designated as one of the leading 
druggists of Woburn. 

His father's family have all been members 
of the First Congregational Church, of which 
their forefather, Abraham Parker, was one of 
the founders; and Gordon joined it by profes- 
sion of faith in 1873. When he was born, 
the Christian names chosen for him were Gor- 
don Rowell, his mother's and his grand- 
mother's family names. It was so registered 
in the office of the Town Clerk, and appears 
in the published records; but, when he was 
christened by the Rev. Dr. March, his father 
gave the first name only, and he has so been 
known ever since. 

In politics he is a Republican, but has 
never held any but appointive office, he having 
been Inspector of Milk and Vinegar under five 
municipal administrations. 

Mr. Parker comes of fighting stock, his an- 
cestors being soldiers in the Colonial wars, 
the Revolution and the War of 18 12; and his 
two brothers, John L. and Charles S., served 
in the Union army in the late war. He traces 
descent from such patriot names as Hildreth, 
Adams, Fletcher, Butterfield, Keep, Colton, 



Lawrence, Morse, Bowers, Farnsworth, War- 
ren, Rowell, Emerson, Webster, Dustin, Gor- 
don, Ladd, and Bunting. His great-grand- 
father, Ebenezcr Parker, was in Captain 
Butterfield's company in Colonel Prescott's 
regiment; and his autograph is on a company 
pay-roll, dated July 11, 1777, in the archives 
at the State House. He was at one time a 
mounted courier at Washington's headcjuar- 
ters. He died in Richmond, Va., and his 
remains are buried in St. John's churchyard. 
His great-grandfather, Samuel Rowell, and 
his great-great-grandfather, Paul Dustin, were 
in the same company in Colonel John Stark's 
regiment, and were at Bunker Hill, Benning- 
ton, Valley Forge, and other battles of the 
Revolution. With such antecedents it is 
quite natural that he should be a member of 
the patriotic society of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution and of the S. A. R. Club of 
Woburn, organized in 1897, and which on 
May 30 decorated the graves of the Revolu- 
tionary patriots in the ancient burying- 
grounds of the city. 

Mr. Parker is a society and club man. He 
took the subordinate degrees in Free Masonry 
in Mount Horeb Lodge and the capitular de- 
grees in Woburn Royal Arch Chapter. He is 
a Knight of Pythias, and has been Chancel- 
lor Commander of Damocles Lodge of Brock- 
ton. He is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, affiliated with Taun- 
ton Lodge, No. 150. He is also connected 
with the Mishawum, Central, and Towando 
local clubs. He is an enthusiastic wheelman, 
and an amateur photographer of acknowledged 
merit. He is an accomplished musician, his 
specialty being the guitar; and he is the or- 
ganist of the local Masonic lodge and chapter. 
He is an ardent sportsman, and loves to spend 
a portion of the shooting and fishing season in 
the backwoods of Maine. 

After the death of his father Mr. Parker set 
up a home of his own with his sister Susan 
for housekeeper, and his friends looked upon 
him as a confirmed bachelor; but he became a 
benedict, marrying on March 15, 1897, Miss 
Ella Annie Kelly, a native of Charlestown. 
After residing a short time on Pleasant Street, 
he purchased an estate on Cleveland Avenue, 
where the three now reside. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Parker is an active and enterprising 
man of business, with a very promising future. 
Without neglect of his own affairs, he inter- 
ests himself in general matters, and is in good 
repute among the people of the city as a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen. 



twyc 



EORGE JAMES TOWNSEND, 
\ ji I M.D., for nearly fifty years a promi- 

— nent physician of South Natick, was 
born in Roxbury, Mass., April 14, 1823, son 
of David S and Eliza (Gerry) Townsend. He 
was a grandson of Dr. David Townsend, who 
was an intimate friend of Dr. Joseph Warren, 
and who served as a surgeon during the Revo- 
lutionary War. Dr. Solomon Townsend, for- 
merly one of the surgeons of the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital, was his uncle; Dr. 
William E. Townsend, formerly of Boston, 
was a cousin; and Dr. Charles W. Townsend, 
of Boston, is a kinsman. 

David S Townsend, son of Dr. David, 
served as a commissioned officer in the War 
of 1812, and was wounded. Later he was a 
paymaster of the United States army, with 
headquarters in Boston. In 1845-47 he was 
treasurer of the Massachusetts Society of the 
Cincinnati, of which his father in 1825-29 
was president. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Eliza Gerry, was a daughter of the Hon. 
Elbridge Gerry, of Marblehead, one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence, 
afterward Governor of Massachusetts and 
Vice-President of the United States. 

When George J. Townsend was very young, 
his parents removed from Roxbury to Boston. 
He began his education in private schools, and 
after two years of later instruction at the Bos- 
ton Latin School was sufficiently advanced at 
the age of sixteen to enter the Sophomore 
class at Harvard University, where he was 
graduated in 1842 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. His professional studies were 
pursued at the Harvard Medical School, which 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1846; and, as the state of his 
health required the stimulating effects of fresh 
country air, he settled in 1849 ^^ South Na- 
tick. Like Goldsmith's village preacher, he 
never afterward changed his field of labor. 



Nor did he wish to do so, for, having secured 
a large practice in this and the surrounding 
towns, he effectually demonstrated his ability 
to maintain it; and few physicians ever had 
the good fortune of making so many sincere 
friends among their patients. He entered the 
sick-room with such an air of cheerfulness and 
reassurance as to encourage and brighten the 
spirits of the sufferer. Many whom he had 
treated in their childhood intrusted to him in 
after years the care of their children. In the 
words of one who knew him well: "A culti- 
vated and refined gentleman, a skilful physi- 
cian of peculiar charm of manner and grace of 
speech, of quick and keen perception, of 
prompt and decisive action in an emergency, 
abreast of the times in the essentials, he was 
worthy of the confidence so generously be- 
stowed upon him by his patients." 

Politically, he was a Democrat, but being 
thoroughly devoted to his profession seldom 
accepted office. Religiously, he was an 
Episcopalian, and it was mainly through his 
efforts that St. Paul's Church at Natick was 
built, he being one of the founders and larg- 
est contributors. Dr. Townsend served as 
president of the Middlesex South Medical So- 
ciety, also as trustee of the Massachusetts 
State Medical and Benevolent Society, and for 
eight years he was chairman of the Board of 
Ethics and Discipline of the Massachusetts 
State Medical Society, of which in 1887 he 
was chosen orator. His public services in 
Natick, which embraced membership of the 
Board of Health and School Committee, were 
efficient; and at the time of his death he was 
serving as a trustee of the Morse Hospital. 
He was also president for twelve years of the 
South Natick Historical Society. In Ma- 
sonry he was well advanced, being a Past 
Master of Meridian Lodge; a member of 
Parker Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; the first 
Prelate of Natick Commandery, Knights 
Templar; Deputy Grand Master in 1878-79; 
and belonging to Boston Lodge of Perfection. 

Dr. Townsend died at his home in this 
town, December 9, 1894. The cause was, 
without doubt, cancer of the stomach. With 
indomitable will and strong nerve force he 
fought against increasing weakness, continu- 
ing his daily rounds until just seven weeks 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



before his death, when he gave up and took to 
his room and- bed, where he patiently endured 
the pain and prostration of his malady till the 
Lord who had sent him called him, and his 
work was done. He left a widow and three 
children — Eliza, Annie, and David. Eliza 
is now Mrs. Birdsall, of Albany, N.Y. 
David Townsend, the only son, a graduate of 
Harvard, i8q6, is now attending the Harvard 
Medical School. 



/^HARLES JOHN McINTIRE, "First 
I VX Judge" of the Probate Court and the 
\^ Court of Insolvency for Middlesex 
County, son of Ebenezer and Amelia 
Augustine (Landais) Mclntire, was born in 
Cambridge, March 26, 1842. He is one of 
the few of our citizens who are lineally de- 
scended from the original Puritan settlers of 
the " Newe Towne, "* being seventh in de- 
scent from John Talcot, who came over with 
the Rev. Thomas Hooker's Braintree company 
in 1632, built his residence upon Brattle 
Street, was one of the first Board of Select- 
men, a Deputy in 1634, 1635, and 1636, and 
in 1637 accompanied Hooker to Hartford, and 
became a jDrominent figure in the Connecticut 
colony. 

His son, Lieutenant Colonel John Talcot, 
was a deputy and the commander-in-chief of 
the Connecticut forces in the Pequot War. 
Ruth, the daughter of the Lieutenant Colonel, 
married John Read, a graduate of Harvard 
College, Attorney-General of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay from 1723 to 1727, and a 
Councillor in 1741 and 1742. Their daughter 
Mary married Charles Morris, of Boston, who 
went with Pepperell in 1745 to the siege of 
Louisburg, in command of a company. He 
remained in Nova Scotia, was a Councillor 
from 1755 to his death in 1802, and Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court from 1776. The 
mother of Judge Mclntire is the grand-daugh- 
ter of Dr. Alexander Abercrombie Peters, a 
United States army surgeon, who married 
Sarah, the daughter of Judge Morris. Mary 
Elizabeth Peters, the daughter of Dr. Peters, 



laEe II of Dr. Paige's History of Cambridge, Jolin Talcott ap- 
ftll ID tlie list of the forty-two original settlers of the " newe 
ind he was the fifth largest land proprietor in the town. 



married Louis Landais, a lieutenant of artil- 
lery and engineers, and son of Judge Francois 
Landais. Amelia Augustine Landais was 
born in Fort Moultrie, Charleston Harbor, 
S.C, while her father was therewith a com- 
mand; and she died in 1896, at the residence 
of her son, the subject of this sketch, at the 
advanced age of ninety-three years. 

On his paternal side Judge Mclntire is 
descended from Philip Mackintire, who came 
a youth from Scotland about 1650, settled at 
Reading, Mass., became a freeholder in that 
town before 1666, and died there in 1720. 
His son Daniel went to Salem ; and his grand- 
son Ebenezer in 1733 went from Salem to 
Oxford, and in 1755 was one of the founders 
of the town of Charlton, in Worcester County, 
a member of the first Board of Selectmen, and 
gave to the town its common and burial- 
ground. His son Ezra was a minute-man and 
a member of the Committee of Correspond- 
ence, Inspection, and Safety during the Revo- 
lutionary War, and in 1788 was a member of 
the Constitutional Convention to ratify the 
Constitution of the United States. 

The father of the Judge was Ebenezer, the 
grandson of Ezra, and was born at Charlton, on 
the paternal farm, came to Cambridge in 1830, 
and died here in 1871. 

While yet a student in Cambridge, in 1862, 
Mr. Mclntire, with Dr. E. R. Cogswell, ex- 
Alderman George F. Piper, the Rev. Henry 
A. Parker, and other classmates, enlisted as a 
private in the Forty-fourth Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers. He took part in all the 
engagements of his regiment, including the 
famous defence of the besieged town of Wash- 
ington, N. C. , and returned to his law studies 
when his term of service had expired. At the 
age of twenty-two years he was admitted to 
the bar of the Supreme Judicial Court, and 
soon built up a good practice. From 1871 to 
1874 he was the Assistant District Attorney 
of Middlesex; and, when Judge Plammond 
was elevated to the bench of the Superior 
Court, in March, 1886, Mr. Mclntire was 
elected by the City Council to fill the position 
of City Solicitor. He performed the work of 
that office so satisfactorily that he was an- 
nually re-elected always by unanimous votes, 
until, on October 26, 1893, Governor Russell 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



appointed him to his present position on the 
bench to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of Judge George M. Brooks. Among his an- 
cestors on his paternal side are the Hastings, 
the Sparhawks, the Means, and Kidders, all 
well known among the early settlers of Cam- 
bridge. 

On September i, 1894, by legislative enact- 
ment, Judge Mclntire was created " First 
Judge" of the two courts. Previous to this 
time, in 1893, he had been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Russell a member of the State Commis- 
sion which revised and codified the election 
laws. He was early prominent in municipal 
affairs, serving in the Common Council in 1866 
and 1867, in the Board of Aldermen in 1877, 
was three years on the School Board (1868-70), 
and in 1883 was the " Temple Hall," or " Pay- 
as-you-go, " candidate for Mayor, when he suc- 
ceeded, in cutting down the majority of his 
opponent so greatly that in the following 
year the election of William E. Russell, who 
succeeded as a candidate, was made easy. Mr. 
Mclntire was a member of the special com- 
mittee which framed our new city charter, 
and afterwards he revised the ordinances to 
conform thereto. In 1869 to 1870 he was 
elected to the legislature, and was chairman of 
the Committee on Insurance and secretary of 
Judiciary. He was vice-president and one of 
the founders of the Colonial Club, and is the 
president of the Cambridge Club, Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Society of Colonial Wars, a 
member of the Sons of the Revolution, of Post 
No. 57, Grand Army of the Republic, and of 
the Forty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment As- 
sociation, whose president he was in 1883. 

Judge Mclntire, during his practice at the 
bar, was engaged in many important causes. 
Among the most notable were the Miller's 
River nuisance cases, which be prosecuted to 
a successful termination, against large odds. 
While City Solicitor, he gained reputation by 
the success of his efforts in preventing the 
Boston & Albany Railroad and the railroad 
commissioners from enforcing an order upon 
the city to build and maintain an iron bridge 
at Front Street, over the tracks of the rail- 
road, which would render the city liable to 
untold land damages, in addition to the enor- 
mous cost and unsightliness of the structure. 



In this case the Supreme Court unequivocally 
indorsed his position, and overruled the order 
of the railroad commissioners, thus saving 
Harvard Bridge and Front Street as a beauti- 
ful approach to the city. The absolute grant 
of Fresh Pond by the Commonwealth to our 
city was also secured by the efforts of Judge 
Mclntire. The questions of ice privileges on 
Fresh Pond and Stony Brook Reservoir dam- 
ages were also satisfactorily settled during his 
City Solicitorship. 

H.is appointment to the bench, as successor 
to the lamented Judge Brooks, was almost 
unanimously urged by the bar of Middlesex 
and by the leading members of the bar of 
Suffolk. Judge Mclntire married Mary 
Theresa, a daughter of George Finegan, Es- 
quire; and his children are: Mary Amelia, 
Henrietta Elizabeth, Charles Ebenezer,. Fred- 
erick May, and Blanche Eugenie. He has 
lived in Cambridge from his birth, and his 
residence is the estate on the south corner of 
Chauncy Street and Massachusetts Avenue. 



WiTliam 
active £ 
Natick, 



RICHARDS, M.D., an 
and successful physician of 
Mass., was born in Hills- 
dale, Columbia County, N.Y. , a son of Dr. 
Joseph Richards, a practitioner of the old 
school of medicine. 

He grew to manhood in his native county, 
and received an academical education at Kin- 
derhook. Beginning the study of medicine 
with Dr. White, he afterward took a course of 
lectures at the Albany Medical College, and 
in 1 861 was graduated at the Eong Island 
Hospital Medical College. Subsequently he 
received a diploma from the Pennsylvania 
University. Being thus well fitted for the 
profession which he had chosen, Dr. Richards 
located first in Cummington, Hampshire 
County, Mass., in 1870, but later removed to 
Brockton, Mass., where he practised ten years 
with great success. In 1882 he came to Na- 
tick, and has here met with continued prosper- 
ity, his patronage being extensive and lucra- 
tive. He holds a deservedly high position 
among his medical brethren, and for several 
years has been a valued contributor to the va- 
rious medical journals of the State. He has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



rendered efficient service to Natick as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health and also as Town 
Physician for many years. An absolute tee- 
totaler and a strong advocate of the temper- 
ance cause, he has exerted a healthful influ- 
ence throughout the community. He belongs 
to the Massachusetts Medical Society, of 
which he has been counsellor some years. He 
is also prominent in the Masonic fraternity, 
being a member of St. George Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of Brockton; the Parker Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; and the Natick Commandery. 

Dr. Richards was united in marriage March 
IS, 1861, with Miss Martha A. Brown, of 
Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Mrs. 
Richards is a woman of strong personality, 
and takes an active part in various local 
organizations, being especially interested in 
the W. C. T. U. 



)EVI BIGELOW, for many years an in- 
fluential citizen of Marlboro, Mass., 
where he was born March 12, 1821, 
and where he died May 5, 1879, was 
a son of Levi and Nancy (Ames) Bigelow, 
and a worthy representative of one of the old 
and substantial Middlesex County families. 
He was of the eighth generation in descent 
from John Biglo (or Bigelow, the name being 
variously spelled), an early inhabitant of 
Watertown, a notice of whose marriage thus 
appears in the ancient records, it being the 
first recorded in that town: "1642-30-8, John 
Bigulah and Mary Warin joyned in marriag 
before Mr. Nowell." 

Mary was the daughter of John and Mar- 
garet Warren, and is said to have been born 
in England. She bore her husband thirteen 
children. John Biglo was a soldier in the 
service from November 25 to December 3, 
1675; he was Surveyor of Highways, 1652- 
60; he was Constable in 1663, and was one 
of "the seven men" {i.e.^ Selectmen) in 1665, 
1670, and 1 67 1. In 1690 he was made a free- 
man. His wife, Mary, died on October 19, 
1 69 1, and he married on October 2, 1694, 
Sarah Bemis, daughter of Joseph Bemis, of 
Watertown. He died July 14, 1703. 

Samuel Bigelow, son of John, born in 
Watertown on October 28, 1653, was married 



June 3, 1674, to Mary, daughter of Thomas 
Flagg. She was born November 4, 1658, and 
died September 7, 1720. Samuel Bigelow 
was an innkeeper, and was one of the leading 
men in Watertown. In 1708-10 he repre- 
sented the town in the General Court. His 
will was proved on February 21, 1731. 

Samuel's son John, who was born in Water- 
town, May 9, 1675, died September 8, 1769, 
married on June 12, 1696, Jerusha, daughter 
of Joseph and Sarah (Gale) Garfield, of 
Watertown. She was born June 6, 1677, and 
died January 16, 1750. This John was the 
first of the family to settle in Marlboro, com- 
ing to that part of the town known as the 
"Farm." On the fifth day of September, 
1705, he, with two other men, was at work in 
that part of Lancaster now Boylston when 
they were surprised by the Indians and made 
prisoners. They were taken to Canada, and 
were detained by the French governor. Mr. 
Bigelow and his companion. Sawyer, being 
good mechanics, they constructed for the gov- 
ernor a very satisfactory saw-mill on the River 
Chambly, and for this service, after some 
delays, were given their freedom and allowed 
to return in safety to their homes. 

The next in this line was Gershom, son of 
John and Jerusha. He was born in Marlboro 
on November 13, 1714, and died January 3, 
i8l2. His wife, Mary, daughter of Thomas 
and Rebecca Howe, was born June 30, 1718, 
and died June 9, 1802. They lived on the 
old homestead, and Gershom was a highly re- 
spected and influential citizen. He was Se- 
lectman in 1763-64, and was a member of 
Captain Abraham Williams's company in 
1757- 

Gershom's second son was Lieutenant 
Ivory, who was born in Marlboro on October 
7, 1 74 1, died February 14, 1804. He mar- 
ried August 13, 1763, Sophia, daughter of 
Lieutenant John and Martha (Hayward) Ban- 
nister. She was born February 7, 1747, and 
died August 13, 1830. The Bannister estate, 
which on the death of his father-in-law 
passed into Lieutenant Ivory's hands, has 
been in the Bigelow family to the present 
time. Ivory Bigelow's title was received for 
meritorious service in the Revolution. 

His son Gershom, second, who was born in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Marlboro, March 22, 1768, and died in this 
place on October 27, 1847, was a farmer and a 
citizen held in high esteem. He was married 
first on January 22, 1787, to Mary, daughter 
of Abraham and Lydia (Howe) Howe. She 
was born February 22, 1769, and died April 
20, 1820. His second marriage took place on 
April 26, 1822, the wife being Eunice 
Wilder, who was born in Sterling, Mass., 
January 13, 1790, and died June 17, 1873, in 
Ohio. Gershom Bigelow, second, had a large 
family of children. 

Levi Bigelow, Sr., his eldest son, known as 
Esquire Bigelow, was born October 28, 1790. 
At- the age of nineteen he began teaching 
school, at first in the town of Holden, Mass. ; 
and he followed that profession during the 
winter for about thirty years, being a greater 
part of the time in Marlboro. The remaining 
months of the year he devoted to farming. 
For a number of years he was in company 
with his brother Lambert in conducting a gen- 
eral merchandise store in the western part of 
Marlboro, but eventually withdrew from the 
firm. In addition to his farming, he did a 
large amount of surveying, making out deeds, 
and settling estates. He was a Justice of the 
Peace for thirty years, known as Esquire Bige- 
low. Always interested in the subject of pub- 
lic education, he served for several years on 
the School Board, was also Overseer of the 
Poor, an Assessor for seventeen years, and 
Representative to the legislature in 1831, 
1832, 1834, and 1839. In all these positions 
he displayed absolute integrity, entire devo- 
tion to the public weal, and unflinching deter- 
mination to accomplish his end when once as- 
sured that any proposed measure was for the 
general good. These same qualities of firm- 
ness and clearly distinguishable honor had 
made him as a teacher command the respect 
and admiration of his pupils and secure the 
most perfect obedience. Many of his former 
pupils, who are to-day leading business men, 
have been known to say that much of the suc- 
cess they have achieved in life has been due 
to the impulse received from him while teach- 
ing. The nobility of his character gave 
weight to his friendly words of counsel. His 
wife was Nancy, daughter of Moses and Lydia 
(Brigham) Ames. She was born March i, 



1792, and died quite suddenly, January 22, 
1850. He died July 23, 1849. 

Levi Bigelow, the younger, the special sub- 
ject of this sketch, inherited many of the 
more prominent traits of character of his 
father. Esquire Bigelow. He taught school 
in Marlboro for a number of years, remaining 
on the home farm until his marriage. After 
that event he removed to Berlin, where he car- 
ried on a farm, and, identifying himself with 
the interests of the town, served as Select- 
man. About 1856 he returned to Marlboro, 
and engaged for a time in shoemaking. He 
at once took a leading place in public affairs 
here, serving as Selectman, Assessor, and 
member of the School Committee. He did a 
large business in land surveying, also in con- 
veyancing, being Justice of the Peace for 
many years. 

In February, 1846, Mr. Bigelow was united 
in marriage with Abigail, daughter of 
Ephraim Hastings, of Berlin. Four children 
blessed this union. They were as follows: 
Martha Abigail, who was born November 18, 
1846, and died January" 6, 1871, having been 
a very successful teacher; Hannah Elizabeth, 
who was born September 17, 1848; Frances 
Ann, who was born September 30, 1850, and 
died September 25, 1869; and a son who died 
in infancy. Mrs. Bigelow died May i, 1873. 

Miss Hannah Bigelow, the only child now 
living, is a woman of education and of philan- 
thropic spirit, and has contributed much to 
the welfare of her native town. She was 
graduated in 1876 from the Women's Medical 
College of Philadelphia, and shortly after 
went to Europe, where she spent three years 
studying in the hospitals and other medical 
institutions. She returned to America with 
the intention of practising her profession, but 
the death of her father a week after her return 
left her with a large estate to manage; and 
she has found it necessary to devote a large 
amount of time to looking after her financial 
interests. Miss Bigelow has been active in 
social and educational circles. She is a mem- 
ber of the society of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, of the Marlboro Public 
Library Committee since 1882, and of the 
Unitarian Parish. She was instrumental in 
organizing the Marlboro Hospital. All 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



worthy charities and benevolences find in her 
a generous and influential friend, and she is a 
warm champion of every movement looking 
toward the improvement of the town or the 
welfare of its citizens. 



fOSEPH S. BRADLEY, of the firm of 
Bradley & Sayward and one of Hud- 
son's most prominent citizens, was 
born in Worcester, May 20, 1823, son 
of William F. and Mary (Stevens) Trow- 
bridge. His grandfather was Joseph Trow- 
bridge, of Marlboro, a prominent man in the 
early history of the town, and was Lieutenant 
in the Continental army, and marched to Cam- 
bridge. William Trowbridge was born in 
Marlboro, July 11, 1788. When a young man 
he learned the machinist's trade, and subse- 
quently worked at it in Worcester, Stow, and 
Sutton. Later he returned to Marlboro, but 
after the death of his wife went to Matteawan, 
N.Y., and thence to Oswego, where he was a 
second time married. Then he went to Can- 
ada, and took up his residence in the little 
town of Chelsea, across the river from Ottawa. 
Here he did business as a contractor, putting 
up woollen-mills and fitting them. About 
i860 he returned and settled in Hudson, re- 
maining here until his death. He was a 
thirty-second degree Mason, and was much in- 
terested in the ancient craft. His first wife, 
the mother of Joseph S. and of his elder 
brother, William F. , now deceased, was Mary, 
a daughter of Daniel Stevens, who was a resi- 
dent of this place. 

After the death of his mother Mr. Bradley 
adopted the name he now bears, and which he 
has so honorably worn. His early educa- 
tional advantages were limited, as at the age 
of twelve years he left school and began to 
make shoes. He followed this' trade until 
1850, when he became a partner with Francis 
Brigham. It may be interesting to note the 
improvement made during the last half-cen- 
tury in the manufacture of shoes. When Mr. 
Bradley was a young man he spent some time 
in travel, and remained for a winter in Ottawa, 
Canada, where he plied his trade in a log 
cabin. The leather was delivered to him in a 
basket, cut into desirable size, pounded into 



shape on a lap stone, and fitted to the last. 
He crimped the boots into shape over the root 
of an oak-tree, and with a jack-knife whittled 
his own pegs from a stick of white maple 
which was split into pieces. The awls were 
also made by the workmen, and everything 
about the business was done in the same prim- 
itive manner. This was more than fifty years 
ago, and what it then took days to accomplish 
can now be done in as many minutes. Mr. 
Bradley worked in Worcester, Woburn, and 
other places, and then coming to Hudson was 
employed by Lorenzo Stratton and subse- 
quently by Mr. Brigham. Having proved his 
executive and financial ability, he was taken 
into partnership by Mr. Brigham, and the 
business was carried on in the building now 
occupied as a store by C. L. Woodbury. 
Here the stock was cut, and a large part of it 
was sent out and made into shoes by Berlin 
shoemakers. From this building the firm 
moved into a brick building built in 1857 on 
the banks of the Assabet, and began to manu- 
facture shoes by machinery, making from two 
to three thousand pairs per day. Mr. Brad- 
ley's copartnership with Mr. Brigham and 
W. F. Trowbridge continued for nearly thirty 
years, and during this time he saw periods of 
prosperity and periods of depression, but in 
the long run he achieved success; and, when 
in 1879 he went out of the firm, he took with 
him a pre.stige which gave immediate success 
to the new firm, Bradley & Sayward, estab- 
lished in the following year. Messrs. Brad- 
ley & Sayward began business in the building 
on the corner of Main and Houghton Streets, 
which has a floor space of over twenty-two 
thousand square feet, is operated by steam, and 
fully equipped with the latest machinery and 
appliances for the manufacture of women's 
and misses' boots and shoes. About one hun- 
dred and fifty hands are employed, and the 
daily output of the factory is between twenty- 
five hundred and thirty hundred pairs. There 
is a branch factory at Dover, N. H., where a 
heavier grade of goods is manufactured ; 
namely, men's grain plough and wool-lined 
boots, plough shoes, etc. The Boston office 
of the firm is at 133 Summer Street. The 
house is known in the trade as one which con- 
ducts all its business in the most honorable 




JOSEPH S. BRADLEY. 



PUBLIC 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



manner, and its business standing is unex- 
celled. It has added materially to the Indus- 
trial development of Hudson, and the towns- 
people have been glad to honor Mr. Bradley 
in many ways. He has been Town Treasurer 
for twenty years, and has held various other 
positions. As a financier, Mr. Bradley takes 
high rank. He was one of the incorporators 
of the Hudson National Bank, and is now its 
president. He is also vice-president of the 
Savings Bank, and has been a member of its 
Investment Committee since the bank was 
organized, twenty-seven years ago. He is 
also a director in the Wachusett National 
Bank at Fitchburg, and at one time was di- 
rector in the People's Bank of Marlboro. 

Mr. Bradley has been thrice married. By 
his first wife, Lucy Phillips, of Hubbardston, 
Mass., he has one daughter, Eva, now the 
wife of Frederick Dawes and mother of two 
sons — Frederick and Leslie Dawes. The 
second wife was Lucy, daughter of Seth Saw- 
yer, of Charlestown, Mass. She was the 
mother of a daughter, Susan, who died at the 
age of nine years. On February 9, 1898, Mr. 
Bradley married Mary Stevens Sawyer, of 
Athol, Mass. 

Mr. Bradley is a member of the Unitarian 
church, and was on the Standing Committee 
when the church was built. Fraternally, he 
is connected with Trinity Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of Clinton. He has travelled extensively in 
Europe, and has met many distinguished 
people. The Bradley residence is one of the 
finest in town. It is surrounded by beautiful 
grounds, which show the excellent taste of 
their owner. 



TTAALEB L. BRIGHAM, the cashier of 
I \y the Hudson National Bank, was born 
V ^ ^ in Marlboro, March 12, 1858, son 
of Tileston and Maria L. (Russell) 
Brigham. He is of the eighth generation de- 
scended from Thomas Brigham, who, born in 
England, embarked at London for America, 
April 18, 163s, on the good ship "Susan and 
Ellyn," Edward Payne master, being then 
about thirty-two years of age. This ancestor 
settled in Watertown, on land that was after- 
ward made a part of Cambridge. He was 



made a freeman in 1639, and in the following 
year he was elected Selectman. About 1637 
he married Mercy Kurd, who was also born in 
England. He died December 8, 1653. His 
wife, who survived until 1693, was twice mar- 
ried after his death, one of her husbands hav- 
ing been Edmund Rice. Thomas Brigham, 
Jr., who was born in 1641, came to Marlboro 
with his mother. On arriving at his major- 
ity, he purchased a town right, and settled on 
what is now known as the Warren Brigham 
farm. His first wife was Mary, daughter of 
Henry and Elizabeth (Moore) Rice, and his 
second marriage united him to Mrs. Susanna. 
Morse, of Watertown. He died on November 
25, 1 71 7. His son Gershom, born February 
23, 1680, who died on January 3, 1749, was a 
physician and a land surveyor. Gershom 's 
son, Benjamin, was born February 19, 171 5. 

Caleb Brigham, son of Benjamin and great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
born November 20, 1743, and died September 
13, 1829. On September 3, 1766, he married 
Hannah, daughter of Daniel Barnes. Caleb 
(second), born December 26, 1788, was an 
unusually skilful performer on the violin, and 
was known all over this section of the State 
as a dancing-master and a teacher of etiquette. 
His wife was Martha Brigham. Their son, 
Tileston, who was born in Marlboro on Au- 
gust 25, 1822, was educated in the town 
schools, and subsequently followed the trade 
of shoemaker. Hudson was one of the pio- 
neer towns in the United States in the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes, Francis Brigham 
having first started the business here in 1836. 
Tileston was a member of the United Brethren 
Lodge, F. & A. M., and a charter member of 
Marlboro Lodge, I. O. O. F. He attended 
and supported the Unitarian church. His 
death occurred March 28, 1896. His wife, 
Maria L., was a daughter of Otis Russell, of 
Marlboro. Born December 31, 1825, she 
died November 13, 1887. Of her six chil- 
dren, five grew to maturity, namely: Alfred 
W=, of Marlboro; Otis T., of Bancroft, la.; 
Caleb L., the subject of this sketch; Benjie 
E., of Marlboro; and Mabel ]., of Danvers. 
The first-born, Frank, is deceased. 

Caleb L. Brigham, the fourth bearer of that 
name, received his early education in the pub- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lie schools of his native town. Subsequently 
he attended the New England Conservatory of 
Music, and graduated from that institution in 
1876. After this he received special instruc- 
tion in the manipulation of the piano and 
organ in the Boston University College of 
Music. He had been a teacher of music and 
an organist for some time, when, on account 
of some trouble with his wrist, he was obliged 
to give up his musical practice. In 1878 he 
came to Hudson, and took a position as clerk 
in the Hudson Savings Bank, his uncle, 
Francis Dana Brigham, being at that time the 
treasurer of the bank. He remained there 
until March 26, 1882, when he became clerk 
in the Hudson National Bank. In this insti- 
tution about a year later he was appointed 
cashier, which position he holds at the present 
time. 

Mr. Brigham's marriage with Annie E. , 
daughter of Charles H. Robinson, of Hudson, 
has been blessed by four children — Ada M., 
Eva B. , Laura G., and Marion R. Mrs. 
Brigham is a member of the Unitarian church, 
and Mr. Brigham is the leader of the church 
orchestra, which he organized several years 
ago. He is a member of Doric Lodge, F. & 
A. M., and has been its organist for many 
years. He is also a member of Rawson Coun- 
cil, R. A., and of Corinthian Chapter, Eastern 
Star; and he has been the superintendent of 
the Unitarian Sunday-school for some years. 



(bffFE 



HE KENDALL FAMILY, of Dunsta- 
JJI ble, which is well known in this county, 
-^ and which has been closely connected 
with the history of Dunstable, traces its line- 
age to Francis Kendall, an Englishman, who 
came to Massachusetts in 1640, and who set- 
tled permanently in Woburn, where he was 
taxed as early as 1645. The name is said to 
be derived from the River Ken in Westmore- 
land County, England. 

The first of the Kendalls in Dunstable were 
John, Abraham, and Ebenezer, who came here 
from Woburn in 1726. They were sons of 
Jacob Kendall and grandsons of Francis. 
Ebenezer did not remain permanently in Dun- 
stable, but his two brothers married and set- 
tled here. Mrs. Frances Fletcher may be 



named as the representative of the posterity of 
Abraham Kendall, who has no descendants in 
the male line now living at Dunstable. 

John Kendall settled in the north-eastern 
part of the town. He had a commission from 
Governor Shirley in 1749 as Second Lieuten- 
ant in a regiment of foot soldiers, of which 
Eleazer Tyng was Colonel. His wife was 
Deborah Richardson. Their son Jacob mar- 
ried Elizabeth Cutler, and resided near his 
parents. He died at about the age of eighty 
years. 

Jacob's son, Captain Jonas Kendall of the 
State militia, married Olive Butterfield, of 
Dunstable, and remained on the farm owned 
by his father. He built in 1813 the house 
in which Deacon Jonas now lives. He had 
two sons, Jonas, Jr., and Chiles. Jonas, Jr., 
was a machinist at Holyoke. He died at 
South Framingham at the age of eighty-six. 
Chiles, who was born in 1798, and died in 
1887, spent his life on the farm. His wife, 
Susannah Taylor, died March 26, 1897, in 
her ninety-fifth year. They had a daughter, 
Alicia, and a son, Jonas Chiles, born May i, 
1833. Alicia is the wife of Levi Putnam, of 
Walden, N.H. 

Jonas Chiles resides on the ancestral farm. 
He married in i860 Miss Maria A. Pierce, 
of Townshend, Vt. , and has the following 
named children : Frederick Lincoln, Caroline 
Elizabeth, Anna Lillian, James Edward, and 
Evangeline. Frederick Lincoln is a graduate 
of Carleton College in Minnesota, and is now 
teaching at Ridgeville, Ind. Caroline Eliza- 
beth graduated from Moores School, and was 
in the employ of the American Missionary 
Association for seven years. She is teaching 
in Meridian, Miss. Anna Lillian is at home, 
as is also James Edward. Evangeline, a grad- 
uate of Wellesley, is a teacher in South 
Windsor, Conn. The father is a Republican 
in politics, and strongly believes in prohibi- 
tion. He is a prominent member of the Con- 
gregational church, and has been a Deacon for 
several years. 

ALMOND MESSER KENDALL, one of 
the leading citizens of Dunstable, was born in 
the house where he now lives, March 16, 
1836, son of Peter and Elizabeth (iMesser) 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Kendall. He is descended from the immi- 
grant Francis Kendall, through his son Jacob 
and his grandson Lieutenant John, the latter 
of whom settled at Dunstable, in the east part 
of the town, one hundred and seventy or more 
years ago. Lieutenant Temple Kendall was 
born August 21, 1732, and died March 6, 
1822. He was married in March, 1756, to 
Abigail Cummings, who was born January 9, 
1735, and died June i, 1820. Lieutenant 
Temple's son. Temple Kendall, second, grand- 
father of Mr. Almond M. Kendall, was born 
May 28, 1768, and died August 20, 1850. 
He married on November 22, 1792, Prudence 
Swallow, who was born July 26, 1773, and 
died January 6, 1868. He was the first to 
organize a branch of the Universalist denomi- 
nation here, and most of his descendants have 
been connected with that religious organiza- 
tion. 

Peter Kendall, above named, was born Oc- 
tober 14, 1793, and died September 5, 1861. 
He settled on the farm now occupied by his 
descendants about 1829. This was originally 
a part of the Blodgett farm. Peter Kendall 
cut off a large amount of timber and made 
many improvements, building the house about 
1832. He was actively connected with town 
affairs, serving as Town Clerk, School Com- 
mittee, and Selectman. In politics he was al- 
ways a Democrat. About 1842 he was sent to 
the legislature, and served the town as Repre- 
sentative with as much ability and fidelity as 
he had served it in local affairs. He attended 
and supported the Universalist church. He 
married April 5, 1827, Elizabeth Messer, who 
was born November 28, 1806, and died No- 
vember 9, 1887. Their family was as fol- 
lows: Andrew Temple, who died in Nashua, 
April I, 1894, at the age of sixty-five; James 
Madison, who died in 1854, aged twenty-four; 
Sarah Elizabeth, wife of Erwin D. Wilder, of 
North Lyndeboro, N. H. ; Josiah Alonzo, who 
lives at Atlantic, and is a machinist in South 
Boston; Almond Messer, who is further men- 
tioned below; Hannah Jane, who died in in- 
fancy; Hiram Romanzo, a farmer, who was 
later a soldier in General Banks's division, and 
died at Natchez, Miss., aged twenty-four; 
Charles Lavander, a farmer of Milford, N. H. ; 
George Edwin, real estate agent at South 



Framingham; and Horace Manley, a machinist 
of Fitchburg, Mass. 

Mr. Almond Kendall lives on the paternal 
farm, of which he took charge after the death 
of his father. On August 30, 1877, he mar- 
ried Mrs. Laura A. Marshall, daughter of 
John F. and Sally (Cummings) Queen, of 
Tyngsboro. Mr. Queen died at his daughter 
Laura's on May 13, 1896. His wife, now 
about seventy-eight years of age, ' is living 
with her daughter Abbie, wife of John A; 
Parkhurst, on the farm adjoining Mr. Ken- 
dall's. Mrs. Kendall's former husband, 
John Harriman Marshall, of Tyngsboro, who 
died in East Cambridge, was a merchant at 
Dracut and son of James Marshall, owner 
of what is now Woodlawn at Tyngsboro. 
Mrs. Kendall has two daughters by her first 
marriage, namely : Ida Blanche, now Mrs. 
Addison Woodward, of Pepperell; and Cora 
Belle, now Mrs. A. W. Newell, of Pepperell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kendall have one son, Hubert 
Marshall Kendall, born June 18, 1SS5. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Kendall have been active workers 
in the Universalist church. Mr. Kendall in 
politics is a Democrat. 



LBRIDGE GERRY BARKER, one of 
the best known and largest lumber 
dealers and manufacturers of Middle- 
sex County, is at the head of the Barker Lum- 
ber Company of Woburn. He was born June 
5, 1850, in Onondaga County, New York, son 
of George Humphrey Barker, and the young- 
est of a family of four children. On the pa- 
ternal side he comes of old Massachusetts 
Colonial stock. 

His grandfather, George Barker, son of 
George Barker, Sr., was for a long period one 
of the leading merchants of Marblehead, 
where he lived to the age of eighty-six years, 
the place at one time enjoying a high degree 
of commercial prosperity. His wife, Abigail 
Devereux, belonged to one of the prominent 
families of that historic town, the race in 
England whence they sprang dating from the 
Norman Conquest, deriving their patronymic, 
it is said, from the town of Evreux, in Nor- 
mandy, whence d' Evreux. How nearly the 
early representatives of the name in New Eng- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



land, settlers in Essex County, this State, 
were related to Robert Devereux, Earl of 
Essex in the time of Queen Elizabeth, must 
be left to the family genealogist to determine. 

George Humphrey Barker was born in 
Marblehead in 1805, and died in 1859. He 
was engaged in seafaring pursuits in his early 
life, and was at one time supercargo of a 
ship. He married Eliza, daughter of Horace 
and Delilah Hayden, of Onondaga County, 
New York, in 1839, and by this union had 
four children, as follows: B. Devereux, who 
died in 1863; George G. , born in 1843, who 
served in the war of the Rebellion in Com- 
pany D, Forty-fourth Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, participating in the battles of 
Little Washington, White Hall, and Golds- 
boro, N.C., and is now a resident of Plym- 
outh, Mass., and the president of the National 
Dredging Company of Wilmington, Del. ; 
William G., born in 1846, who resides in 
Salem, Mass., and is engaged in the lumber 
business, with an office at 10 Central Street, 
Boston; and Elbridge, the subject of this 
sketch, who bears the name of one of Marble- 
head's patriotic sons, a signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. 

Elbridge Gerry Barker was educated in the 
public schools of Salem, Mass., at the Farm- 
ington "Little Blue" School, and at the Col- 
legiate and Commercial Institute of New 
Haven, Conn., where he was graduated in 

1867. From that time until September, 

1868, he was book-keeper for the firm of I. S. 
Palmer & Co., 126' Milk Street, Boston. 
Going then to Wilmington, N.C., he was 
there engaged for twenty years in the cotton, 
naval stores, and lumber business on his own 
account, and amassed considerable money in 
his extensive and sagacious operations. In 
1889 Mr. Barker came to Woburn, and, pur- 
chasing the lumber business of J. B. McDon- 
ald, conducted it for si.K years, when he built 
a new plant. He is now carrying on a sub- 
stantial business under the firm name of the 
Barker Lumber Company, E. Gerry Barker, 
proprietor. In addition to having a large 
wholesale and retail lumber busines, he is en- 
gaged in planing and moulding mills, man- 
ufacturing house finish, and some specialties. 
He receives supplies from mills in Maine, 



New Hampshire, Vermont, Michigan, Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, Vir- 
ginia, and North Carolina, and imports to 
some extent from Canada. He sells princi- 
pally to the home trade, but sends some of his 
specialties to Boston, Philadelphia, and the 
South. 

Mr. Barker was made a MasOn in Wilming- 
ton Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 319, of Wil- 
mington, N.C., which he served as Master. 
He is also a member of Concord Chapter, No. 
I, R. A. M., and of Wilmington Commandery, 
K. T., both of Wilmington, N. C. He is a 
Democrat in politics, but has never sought 
public office. He is a member of the Unita- 
rian church, and has served on the Parish 
Committee. 

Mr. Barker was married May 10, 1871, to 
Alice M., daughter of Dr. J. T. and Catherine 
(Joiner) Schonwald, of Wilmington, N.C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barker have five children, 
namely: George G., born in 1872 in Wil- 
mington, N.C, who attended the Brigham 
School of Asheville, N.C, and was afterward 
graduated at the Woburn High School and at 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; A. 
May, born in 1876 in Wilmington, who was 
graduated at the Woburn High School in 
1896, and is now at home; Katherine D., who 
was born in 1877 in Wilmington, was gradu- 
ated at the Woburn High School in 1896, and 
is now in Smith College at Northampton, 
Mass.; E. Gerry, Jr., born in 1880, who is 
now in the high school; and Anna W., born 
in 1882 in Wilmington, now a pupil in the 
grammar school. 



EVI PALMER ELLITHORPE, the 

well-known undertaker of Hudson, 
was born December 14, 1S25, in 
West Day, Saratoga County, N. Y., 
son of Wiley and Lucy (Allen) Randall Elli- 
thorpe. His grandfather, Azariah, who was 
born in Thompson, Conn., removed to Edin- 
burgh, N.Y., where he was a Justice of the 
Peace for many years. Azariah's son, Wiley, 
born in Thompson about 1792, was taken to 
Edinburgh when about nine years of age, and 
grew up in that town. About the time of his 
marriage he removed to the adjoining town of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



West Day, where he was engaged in farming 
during the remainder of his life. He was a 
Captain in the militia and a prominent man 
in town affairs. His wife, who before her 
marriage with him was Mrs. Lucy Randall, 
was a daughter of Jonathan Allen, a cousin of 
the famous Ethan Allen. She had by her first 
marriage four children — Philo, Warren, Will- 
iam, and Sarah, all of whom are deceased. 
By Wiley EUithorpe she had two children — 
Levi P. and Esther B. Esther is now the 
widow of Charles Parson, and resides in New 
Hampshire. 

Levi Palmer EUithorpe received his educa- 
tion in the district schools of Edinburgh, 
N.Y. , and remained on the home farm until his 
twenty-first year. In April, 1847, he came 
to Hudson, where he learned the currier's 
trade. Two years later he went to work in a 
shoe shop. He continued in the shoe busi- 
ness until August 9, 1868, when he started in 
that of undertaker. In this he has been very 
successful, and his services have been called 
for over a wide circle. The oldest under- 
taker in this section, he has ofificiated at the 
obsequies of over thirty-two hundred persons. 
In politics he is a Repuialican, and he has never 
voted any other ticket. He is a member of 
Doric Lodge, F. & A. M., and of Houghton 
Chapter and Trinity Commandery. 

Mr. Ellithorpe's wife, Ann W., a daughter 
of Silas Priest, of Hudson, is a grand-daugh- 
ter of Eliphalet Spurr, who kept the o.ld 
Punch Bowl Tavern in Brookline, Mass., and 
who is said to have driven its first stage-coach 
into Boston. Eliphalet married Ann, daugh- 
ter of Colonel James Wesson, of Revolution- 
ary fame, whose ancestor, John Weston, came 
from Buckinghamshire, England, about 1644. 
John's son, John Weston (second), served at 
the siege of Louisburg, and was the father of 
Colonel James Wesson. Colonel Wesson, 
born in Sudbury, April 2, 1734, was living in 
Brookline at the outbreak of the Revolution. 
He was the most distinguished officer given 
by that town to the service of the colonies in 
the great war for independence. The public 
records state that a vote of thanks was given 
Colonel James Wesson "for the good service 
he has rendered the town by enlisting the 
aforementioned sixteen men for this town," 



and it was also voted "that a sum of six 
pounds be paid him as a further acknowledg- 
ment for that service." Not much is known 
of Colonel Wesson's residence in Brookline. 
He probably settled there before the year 
1768, as on May 25 of that year he married 
Ann White, of Brookline. He enlisted on 
May 18, 1775, as Major in Colonel Laomni 
Baldwin's regiment, the Thirty-eighth Massa- 
chusetts, and was stationed for almost a year 
— now at one, now at another — in the forts 
around Boston. His name appears on the 
records of 1776 with the title of Lieutenant 
Colonel of Colonel Baldwin's regiment at 
New York. On November 12, 1776, Colonel 
Wesson served as member of a court-martial 
at Phillipsburg, Pa. He was stationed at 
Trenton, N.J., in the following December, 
and three days later he was at Mixfield, Pa. 
In 1777 he was with the Ninth Massachusetts 
Regiment in Boston until the last of March, 
when by order of General Heath a part of 
the regiment went to Ticonderoga, the rest of 
the men following in the latter part of April. 
Yet it is probable that Colonel Wesson did 
not go with the first detachment, as his wife 
was at that time ill of small-pox. She died 
on April 6 of that year. The Colonel took 
part in the battle of Oriskany, which was 
fought on August 6, 1777; and on the 15th of 
that month he was promoted for bravery, being- 
made at that time Colonel of the Eighth 
Regiment. While the Convention troops 
were stationed at Cambridge, Colonel Henley, 
under an accusation, made by General Bur- 
goyne, of cruelty to the British prisoners, was 
placed in arrest and tried by a military court. 
In his address to the court General Burgoyne 
complimented the president, General Glover, 
on his honorable treatment of the Convention 
troops on the march to Boston, and paid his 
respects to Colonel Wesson, who held the im- 
mediate command in the district at the time 
when the troops arrived in November, 1777. 
Colonel Wesson fought with credit at the 
battle of Saratoga, and at the battle of Mon- 
mouth Court-house on June 28, 1778. "In 
the latter battle," says a writer, "our artil- 
lery, under Knox, opened an unexampled can- 
nonade, to which the British guns fiercely re- 
plied. Colonel Wesson, who then commanded 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment, was in 
the front line. Leaning over his horse's neck 
to look under the cannon smoke, which envel- 
oped everything, a ball from the enemy grazed 
his back, tearing away his clothing, and with 
it fragments of his flesh. Had he remained 
upright a moment longer, he would have been 
killed. As it was, he remained a cripple for 
life." In describing this battle. General 
Heath says, "It was here that the firm Colo- 
nel Wesson had his back peeled of its muscles, 
almost from shoulder to shoulder, by a can- 
non-ball.'' After his return from the war. 
Colonel Wesson probably remained a resident 
of Brookline until 1784. He was a land- 
holder there some years later. Afterward he 
removed to his farm in Marlboro, now a part 
of the town of Hudson, and died there on Oc- 
tober 15, 1809. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellithorpe have had four 
daughters, namely: Flora M., now deceased, 
who was the wife of Frank B. Holden, of 
Worcester; Marion A., now the wife of Frank 
A. Davidson, of Boston ; Sarah Beatrice, who 
married Benjamin B. Kenyon, an attorney-at- 
law in New York City; and Florence A., now 
Mrs. Henry J. Herrick, of Hudson. Both of 
the parents regularly attend the Unitarian 
church, and are liberal supporters of that so- 
ciety's works of benevolence. 



born 



OHN HENRY HARTWELL, a well- 
known and highly respected citizen of 
Arlington, the senior member of the 
firm of J. Henry Hartwell & Son, was 
in IBoston, January 16, 1835, son of John 
B. and Julia Ann (Harrington) Hartwell. 
His paternal grandfather, William Hartwell, 
was a farmer of Bedford, Mass., and died there 
at the age of forty-eight. He was an attend- 
ant of the Orthodo.x church. By his first wife, 
whose maiden name was Joanna Davis, he had 
eight children, of whom John B., above 
named, was the youngest. By his second 
wife, Mary Lake, William Hartwell had four 
children. Of these, a son Elbridge is now 
living. He married Lucy Lane, and has one 
son, Edwin. 

John B. Hartwell, when a young man, learned 
the carpenter's trade at Billerica, Mass. ; and 



he subsequently worked at it in Lowell, in 
Claremont, N. H., in Boston, and in Arlington, 
having come to this place in 1836, the town 
then being known as West Cambridge. In 
1 84 1 he was appointed undertaker, and he re- 
mained in that line of business until 1S84, 
when he retired. He died January ig, 1888, 
in his eightieth year; and his wife, who was 
the daughter of Samuel Harrington, of West- 
minster, Mass., died February 21, 1890, also 
in her eightieth year. Mr. John B. Hartwell 
was Constable of Arlington for many years, 
and was janitor of the Unitarian church for 
about thirty years. In politics he was a 
Whig, and he was warmly interested in local 
affairs. His two children were: John Henry 
Hartwell and Charles F., the latter of whom 
married May J. Boothby, and has four 
children. 

The subject of this sketch was but a year 
old when his parents came to Arlington, and 
he received his education in the public schools 
of this town. After leaving school, he went 
to South Boston, where he was employed in a 
dry-goods store for three years and a half. 
He then returned to Arlington and learned the 
carpenter's trade, at which he worked until 
i860, when he went to Boston and worked for 
John Peak & Son, learning the undertaker's 
business. Five years later he came back to 
Arlington and went into business with his 
father, and after his father's retirement he, 
the son, took charge of the business, which he 
has conducted to the present time, having re- 
cently taken his son into partnership. The 
business has been in his family now for fifty- 
six years, and has been carried on at the same 
place. Mr. Hartwell has been interested in 
many things in Arlington outside his under- 
taking business. He was janitor of the Ar- 
lington schools for five years, and for sixteen 
years was Chief of Police. 

On November 21, 1861, Mr. Hartwell was 
married to Emmeline Augusta, daughter of 
Leonard Stearns, of Belmont. Four children 
have been born of this union; namely, 
George H., Ada Augusta, Charles T., and 
Julia A. George H. married Emma Greenard, 
and has one child, Grace M. Ada is the wife 
of James W. Nickles, and has three children 
— Clara, Esther, and Howard. Charles T. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married Annie M. Saville. They have no 
children. Mrs. Enimeline A. Hartwell died 
September 19, 1883. She was a devoted 
member of the Universalist Church of Arling- 
ton. Mr. Hartwell is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and is one of the prominent citizens of 
the town. He is a Mason and a member of 
Hiram Lodge, of Arlington. 



WILLIAM MANNING, of : 
Chelmsford, one of the leading 
italists of Middlesex County a 



East 
cap- 
iddlesex County and a 
son of Theophilus and P&lly (Patten) Man- 
ning, was born in Billerica, Mass., October 
29, 1823. The founder of the Manning fam- 
ily in this country was William Manning, who 
was buried in Cambridge, Mass. William's 
son, Samuel, born in 1644, settled in Billerica 
in 1662. The house in which he lived, and 
in which many generations of Mannings were 
born, is still standing. Samuel's son, Will- 
iam, born in 1677, is the next in line of de- 
scent. Following came two other Williams, 
the first of whom, born in 1707, died in 1764; 
and the second, born in 1747, who was Second 
Lieutenant in Captain Kidder's company in 
the Continental army in 1776, died in 18 14. 
Lieutenant Manning was the father of twelve 
children. The Mannings were all zealous 
supporters of the church. This was especially 
true of the Lieutenant's daughters, Lucinda 
and Jerusha, who never married. Lucinda, 
who was the last one to occupy the old Man- 
ning homestead, moved to Chelmsford after 
the others died, and gave to the church at 
North Billerica the income of the house and 
farm to support the preaching. She died in 
1887. 

Theophilus Manning, a son of Lieutenant 
Manning, born in 1777, was reared on the old 
farm. His chief occupation was agriculture. 
He lived in Harvard for a number of years, 
and spent the latter part of his life on the old 
Patten estate in East Billerica. His death 
occurred in 1868. In 1807 he was married to 
Hannah, daughter of Asa Patten. She died 
in 1S13, leaving the following children: Han- 
nah, who was the wife of John Chandler, of 
Tewksbury, and died at the age of eighty-two; 
Sarah, also deceased, who was the wife of Am- 



brose F. Page, of Billerica; and Polly, who 
died unmarried in 1874. A second marriage 
in 1817 united Theophilus to his first wife's 
sister, Polly, who died in 1871. Her chil- 
dren were: Theophilus, who was a resident of 
Chelmsford for some time, and died in Salem, 
Mass., in 1876; William, the subject of this 
sketch; and Asa, unmarried, who lives in 
Lowell. 

William Manning remained with his father 
until 1846. Gifted with a keen intellect and 
natural mechanical ability, he made his own 
implements and many other useful articles. 
When he moved to Chelmsford it was a very 
sleepy village, but his spirit soon infused life 
into the place. He engaged on a small scale 
in growing pop-corn and manufacturing it into 
the popular pop-corn balls. He had teams to 
deliver his goods, and was the first to carry 
pop-corn into Boston. When he had been 
three years in the business he had saved some 
money, and was able to purchase the farm on 
which he resides. For some time he contin- 
ued to manufacture his goods at home. 
Twenty-nine years ago he built a factory in 
Lowell, at the corner of Broadway and School 
Street, where all his confectionery is now 
made. In the business over half a century, 
he has now an immense trade, mainly in New 
England, but extending also through the 
West. He has also invested largely in real 
estate, purchasing and lending money, and 
building in the city of Lowell. His home in 
East Chelmsford is a hundred-acre farm, on 
which he has raised considerable garden prod- 
uce for market, and which he has greatly im- 
proved. He is one of the heaviest tax-payers 
in Chelmsford and Lowell. 

On April 16, 1846, Mr. Manning was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Ann Baldwin, of Billerica. 
He has one child, Charlotte Ann, who is now 
the wife of Erastus A. Bartlett, the superin- 
tendent of the corn factory in Lowell. Mr. 
Manning was in the Massachusetts legislature 
in 1878, and he served for three years on the 
Chelmsford Board of Selectmen. He was the 
first man in Chelmsford to use the present 
mode of buying teams, instead of hiring them, 
for town work. As an official he was able 
and popular. He has pleasant relations with 
his employees, is noted for generous acts of 



3o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



individual charity, and is highly esteemed 
wherever he is known. 



§OSEPH N. AMES, of Wilmington, an 
accomplished French scholar, was born 
in this town, April i, 1858, son of Jo- 
seph A. and Harriet (Gillis) Ames. 
His first ancestor in America on the father's 
side settled in Maine. Joseph Ames, his 
grandfather, at one time resided in Reading, 
Mass. 

Joseph A. Ames, the father, who was born 
in Reading, came to Wilmington in his child- 
hood. His educational opportunities were 
limited; but, being ambitious to fit himself 
for a business career, he by perseverance 
obtained a sum sufficient to enable him to at- 
tend the Andover Academy. After entering 
mercantile life he became quite prosperous, 
was for many years the leading merchant in 
Wilmington, and he accumulated a consider- 
able fortune. His success in life was due to 
his strict integrity and a personal attention to 
every detail of his business. He continued 
active until his death, which -occurred when 
he was sixty-nine years old. Harriot Gillis 
Ames, his wife, who resides in Wilmington, 
is a daughter of Josiah and Mary Stark Gillis 
and a great -great -grand-daughter of General 
Stark of Revolutionary fame. She is the 
mother of five children; namely, Charles G., 
Henry A., Joseph N., Juliet S., and Hen- 
rietta. 

Joseph N. Ames acquired his primary edu- 
cation in Wilmington, and was graduated 
from the Howe School, Billerica, in 1875. 
He studied music at the New England Con- 
servatory. Also attending the Berlitz School 
of Languages, he became proficient in French, 
and was for some time engaged in teaching 
that language in Boston. Since the death of 
his father Mr. Ames has become a permanent 
resident of Wilmington, where he devotes his 
time to the care of his property. 



]CJdWARD H. ELLIS, M.D., who has 
^ practised his profession in Marlboro for 
"^^ " nearly twenty years, was born in 
that part of Medway now called Millis, Feb- 



ruary 6, 1S56, son of James Harvey and Laura 
Ann (Harding) Ellis. The original ancestor 
of the Ellis family in America arrived at 
Plymouth on board the "Mayflower" subse- 
quent to her first voyage, and he settled in 
Sandwich, Mass. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Edward Freeman, of Sandwich, 
and was the father of four sons — Matthew, 
John, Samuel, and Freeman. John Ellis, 
who settled in Medway, wedded Mary Hill, 
of Sherborn, in 1698, and his children were: 
Joseph, Samuel, John, and Timothy. The 
line was continued through Samuel and John 
(first) to John (second), the paternal great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch. 
John Ellis (second), who was a lifelong resi- 
dent of Medway and was commissioned Major 
in 1789 by Governor Hancock, while serving 
in the militia, marched with a company to 
quell a disturbance in Rhode Island. He 
acted as a Justice of the Peace and Notary 
Public, settling many estates, and was one of 
the leading men of Medway in his day. He 
died November 25, 1826, aged seventy-one 
years, eleven months, and twenty-five days. 
Moses Ellis, the grandfather of Dr. Ellis, was 
born in Medway, November 17, 1782. He 
was a prosperous farmer during his active 
years, and he died November 25, i860. 

James Harvey Ellis, Dr. Ellis's father, was 
born September 2, 1828. He owned and cul- 
tivated a large farm located in that part of 
Medway since incorporated as the town of 
Millis, and he was an extensive dealer in 
live stock. He was also engaged in the manu- 
facture of box lumber, and owned considerable 
woodland, the stumpage of which he cut, 
hauled, and sawed at his mill in Medway. In 
his later years he was a Republican, and he 
took a prominent part in local public affairs. 
He served as a Selectman for eight years, was 
Overseer of the Poor and a member of the 
School Board for several terms, and he repre- 
sented his district in the legislature for two 
years. James Harvey Ellis died November 
15, 1875. Laura Ann Harding Ellis, his 
wife, was a daughter of Nathan and Keziah 
(Adams) Harding, the former of whom was a 
native of Medfield, Mass., and a grand-daugh- 
ter of Captain Adams, who met his death 
while defending that town from an attack by 




JOSEPH A. AMES 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Indians. She became the mother of six 
children, as follows: Almera, who died at the 
age of seventeen years; George, a resident of 
Franklin, Mass. ; Estella, the wife of Jason 
M. Hawkes, of Valley Falls, R.I.; Edward 
H., the subject of this sketch; Laura J., who 
married Charles A. Fiske, of Marlboro; and 
Rhoda, the wife of Arthur E. Waite, of 
Millis. 

Edward H. Ellis completed his early educa- 
tion at Dean Academy, Franklin, in 1876. 
Subsequently, after studying medicine for a 
time with Dr. Gallison, of Medway, he en- 
tered the Boston University Medical School, 
graduated therefrom in 1879, and immediately 
began the practice of his profession in Hollis- 
ton, Mass. In September of the same year he 
settled in Marlboro, where his ability and 
worth soon became known and appreciated. 
Although the Doctor is a homoeopathic physi- 
cian, he believes in what is known as the ra- 
tional system, and in his practice makes use 
of the advanced methods of both the Hahne- 
mann and allopathic schools. He has made 
anaesthesia an object of special study and re- 
search, and his practice is both large and lu- 
crative. 

Dr. Ellis is a member of the Massachusetts 
State Medical Society, a member of the Marl- 
boro Medical and Surgical Club, a Royal 
Arch Mason of the United Brethren Lodge 
and Houghton Chapter, and a member of 
United States Pension Board of Marlboro. In 
political belief he is a Republican. He mar- 
ried Hattie Harding Bullard, a daughter of 
Henry Bullard, of Holliston, and has one 
daughter, Helen B. Ellis. The family attend 
the Unitarian church. 



EORGE WESTGATE MILLS, M.D., 
a well-known physician of Medford, 
Mass., and a prominent officer in the 
State militia, was born in this town, Septem- 
ber 26, 1852, son of Caleb and Sarah Stick- 
ney (Sleeper) Mills. His earliest ancestor in 
America was Thomas Mills, who was born in 
Scotland in 1720, and, coming to this country 
when a young man, sojourned for a time in 
Hampstead, N. H., and in 1751 settled in 
Dunbarton, that State. He died January 27, 



1790. His wife, formerly Elizabeth Hoag, 
was among the first settlers of Dunbarton. 
They had nine children, si.x of whom were 
buried in Dunbarton. The eldest, a daughter 
Sarah, was the first female child born in that 
town. Mrs. Elizabeth Hoag Mills died Au- 
gust 30, 1800, aged sixty-eight years. 

John Mills, son of Thomas and Elizabeth, 
was a Deacon of the Congregational church. 
He was distinguished by the title Major, 
holding that rank in the New Hampshire mi- 
litia. He was a soldier at the battle of Bunker 
Hill. Stark says of him in the History of 
Dunbarton, "In all of his transactions he was 
known as a plain-dealing, honest, and upright 
man." Those of his relations who remember 
him bear the same testimony. He showed 
great kindness to the widow and children of his 
brother James. Major John Mills filled many 
town offices, being Representative to the leg- 
islature eight years. Selectman twenty-two 
years, and Treasurer thirty-five years. His 
brother, Thomas, Jr., was a Lieutenant in the 
State militia. He was a volunteer at the 
battle of Bennington. 

Caleb Mills, fifth child of Thomas and 
Elizabeth Mills, and the next in the line now 
being considered, was born June 8, 1765. He 
occupied the homestead, and is mentioned in 
the History as one of the wealthy residents of 
Dunbarton in his day. He died January 17, 
1834. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Tamar Cheney, died February 20, 1850. 
John Mills, eldest son of Caleb and grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, inherited 
the property upon which he resided through 
life. He was the father of twelve children. 
He died August i, 1859. His wife, Nancy 
Bailey Mills, surviving him nearly six years, 
died May 21, 1865. 

Caleb Mills, the second of the name, son of 
John and father of Dr. Mills, was born in 
Dunbarton, January 16, 181 1. He moved to 
Medford, Mass. Sarah Stickney Sleeper, 
whom he wedded May 12, 1836, was born in 
Hopkinton, N.H., April 30, 1815, daughter 
of John and Sarah (Chase) Sleeper, of that 
town. Her maternal grandfather, the Hon. 
Jonathan Chase, of Concord, N. H., served in 
the French and Indian War, and held a Cap- 
tain's commission in the Continental army 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



during the struggle for independence. His 
homestead was located on Dimond's Hill, 
Hopkinton, N. H., where he died in 1798, 
aged sixty-six. He married Sarah Stickney, 
also a native of Concord ; and their youngest 
daughter, Sarah Chase, married John Sleeper. 
The last-named couple were the parents of the 
following children: Jonathan Chase, born Jan- 
uary 9, 1797; Mary Sanborn, born May 30, 
1805; Woodbridge Odlin, born May 3, 1807; 
Elizabeth Carlton, born November 6, 1809; 
William S., born May 16, 1812; and Sarah 
Stickney Sleeper, who married Caleb Mills, 
and was the mother of Dr. Mills. John 
Sleeper died in 1835; and his wife, Mrs. 
Sarah C. Sleeper, died December 24, 1842. 

Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Mills had four children, 
namely : Hermon, born in Dunbarton, Septem- 
ber 5, 1837; Helen Elizabeth, born in Dun- 
barton, April 25, 1840; George Westgate, the 
subject of this sketch; and Medora Mills, who 
was born in Medford, April 13, 1855, and 
died September 18 of that same year. Her- 
mon Mills died of typhoid fever in the hos- 
pital at Beaufort, S. C. , while serving in the 
First Massachusetts Cavalry in the Civil War. 
Helen Elizabeth completed her education at 
the Abbot Female Seminary, Andover, Mass. ; 
and on September 4, 1861, she married George 
Washington Webb Saville, of Quincy, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Saville reside in Maiden. They 
have one son, Caleb Mills Saville, born Feb- 
ruary 27, 1865. He is also a resident of 
Maiden. Mrs. Caleb Mills died December 
12, 1872. 

George Westgate Mills began his education 
in the public schools of Medford, and then 
took the course at the Massachusetts Agricult- 
ural College at Amherst, and received the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. His medical 
studies were pursued at the Harvard Medical 
School, where he was graduated with the class 
of 1879; and he has since been engaged in the 
duties of his profession in Medford. He has 
acquired prominence as an able practitioner, 
and for a number of years served as Town 
Physician. His connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Militia was begun as a pri- 
vate in Company E, Fifth Regiment, with 
which he served three years, being then honor- 
ably discharged as Sergeant. On July 7, 



1893, he was appointed hosiDital steward of 
the First Battalion of Cavalry, Second Bri- 
gade, with rank of Sergeant; and on August 
13, 1894, he was commissioned surgeon, with 
the rank of Major. 

On August II, 1880, Dr. Mills was united 
in marriage with Anna Burke Pratt, who was 
born in Medford, December 9, 1854. Dr. and 
Mrs. Mills are the parents of five children, 
namely: Helen Saville, born February 13, 
1S82; Laura Westgate, born July 4, 1883; 
Hermon Franklin, born June 30, 1886; Sarah 
Chase, who was born February 5, 1891, and 
died April 4, 1893; and Edith Waitt Mills, 
born November 16, 1895. 

Dr. Mills is a member of the Harvard Med- 
ical School Alumni Association, the Massa- 
chusetts Emergency and Hygiene Association, 
the Committee on Lectures to the Militia, and 
of the National Association of Military Sur- 
geons. He is connected with Mount Hermon 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Mystic Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; and Medford Council, l^oyal 
and Select Masters. He is also a member of 
Harmony Lodge, L O. O. F., No. 68, and the 
Medford Historical Society. 



§OHN ADAMS PARKHURST, a lead- 
ing farmer of Dunstable, was born 
April 12, 1834, on the estate that is 
now his residence, son of Henry and 
Abigail (Taylor) Parkhurst. His genealogy 
is traced back to Ebenezer, who, previously 
residing in Chelmsford, Mass., settled in 
Dunstable though it is probable that he 
subsequently returned to Chelmsford. Eben- 
ezer's son, Ensign Ebenezer, settled on the 
farm now occupied by John A. Parkhurst, and 
which has since remained in the family. All 
the various branches of the family are de- 
scended from Ensign Ebenezer. His son, 
Joel Parkhurst, Esq., was a noted attorney -at- 
law in his day, and attended all the courts in 
the county. It is thought that Joel served as 
a Lieutenant in the Revolution. His wife, 
Betty (Cummings) Parkhurst, died October 4, 
i^37t aged ninety-three years. He died 
March 10, 1808, aged sixty-seven. Leonard 
Parkhurst, Joel's son, a Revolutionary soldier 
and the grandfather of John A. Parkhurst, was 




SAMUEL W. CHAMBERLIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



at one time County Coroner. Leonard died 
IVIarch 28, 1821, aged fifty-seven. He mar- 
ried Hannah Hill, of Hudson, N.H., who 
died August 30, 1862, aged ninety-three years 
and four months. His three sons were: 
Henry, John, and Leonard, Jr. John lived in 
Virginia, going there when young, and marry- 
ing there. Leonard Parkhurst, Jr., after 
spending the greater part of his life in Dun- 
stable, died in Hopkinton. 

Henry Parkhurst, born June 17, 1793, was 
for many years one of the most prominent 
residents of Dunstable. During the greater 
part of his life he was ofificially connected 
with the administration of town affairs, hold- 
ing the offices of Selectman, Clerk, and Treas- 
urer, Justice of the Peace, and of Representa- 
tive in the State legislature. In politics he 
was a Democrat and one of the active men in 
his party, shaping its policy in local affairs 
and always ready to further its advancement 
by personal effort. He was a warm-hearted, 
benevolent friend to all suffering humanity, 
ever ready to lend a helping hand to the fallen 
or to cheer and encourage the downcast. In 
addition to his farming he did a big business 
in the New Hampshire lumber trade, boating 
large quantities of bark to VVoburn by way of 
the old Middlesex Canal. He was a member 
of the old military system. His wife, Abi- 
gail Taylor Parkhurst, died September 6, 
1868, at the age of seventy years and seven 
months. He died September 4, 1865. His 
children were: Abigail, Hannah M., Emma 
A., Thomas H., William R., Albert L., and 
John Adams. Abigail is now Mrs. E. B. 
Armstrong, of Waltham. Hannah M., who 
has been a teacher nearly all her life in this 
town and in New York, being for a time prin- 
cipal of Clinton (N.Y.) Liberal Institute 
and later of a boarding-school at Newburg, 
N.Y., is now living at the old homestead. 
Emma married I. N. Wright, and lived in 
Pepperell, where she died twenty-five years 
ago. Thomas H. is now in Winchester, 
Mass. William R. went to California' in the 
days of the gold digging craze, and died there 
when about twenty-five years of age. Albert 
spent the greater part of his life on the old 
farm, and died March 3, 1889. His wife, who 
was Mrs. Betsey Swayne, born Batchelder, 



and 



iving in New Hamp- 



survives hi 
shire. 

John Adams Parkhurst has lived on the old 
homestead all his life, engaged in farming. 
In 1867 he married Miss Fannie M. Queen, 
who died April 19 of the following year. On 
April 20, 1870, he married Miss Abbie A. 
Queen, a sister of the first Mrs. Parkhurst and 
of Mrs. Kendall, of whose husband, A. M. 
Kendall, a biography will be found on another 
page. Mrs. Parkhurst 's mother resides with 
her. The children of this marriage are Fan- 
nie M. and Henry A. Fannie M. graduated 
from Chelmsford High School, married James 
H. Woodward, of Dunstable, and has one 
child, Clarence H. Henry A. graduated from 
Westford Academy, and is now on his father's 
farm. 

Mr. Parkhurst, Sr. , is a prominent Dem- 
ocrat, and has served the town as Selectman 
for four years. He has also been on the 
School Board. His public duties have been 
fulfilled in a manner that has reflected credit 
on himself and on the name he bears. He is 
a member of the Universalist Society. 



AMUEL W. CHAMBERLIN, o 
Stoneham, an inventor and manu 
facturer of shoe factory machinery 
was born in Rochester, N. H., De 
cember 31, 1832, son of Moses and Nancy 
(Wentworth) Chamberlin. He is a descend 
ant of William Chamberlin, who settled at 
Cambridge, Mass., in 1672. His paterna 
grandfather, Samuel Chamberlin, was a cousin 
of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlin, formerly Gov- 
ernor of Maine. On the mother's side he 
traces his ancestry to the Rev. William Went- 
worth, who settled in New Hampshire in 1638, 
and with others had a royal grant from King 
James of a tract of land thirty miles square. 
They made a settlement at what is now Exeter, 
N. H. Sir John Wentworth, the last royal 
Governor of New Hampshire, was of the same 
family; and Mr. Chamberlin is a cousin of 
" Long John " Wentworth, the pioneer printer 
of Chicago. Moses Chamberlin was for many 
years a prominent resident of Dover, N. H., 
where he followed the business of building 
contractor and real estate dealer, and served 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for twenty-eight years in succession as a 
Selectman and Highway Surveyor. 

Samuel W. Chamberlin, having been edu- 
cated in Dover and Rochester, when fifteen 
years old taught school. At the age of seven- 
teen he was second overseer in the carding- 
room of the Whitehouse Mills, Rochester. 
He subsequently relinquished that position, 
and learned shoemaking. In May, 185 1, he 
went to Charleston, S. C. , where he was fore- 
man in the bottoming department of a shoe 
factory until the following December. Then 
he returned North, and for the succeeding two 
years was engaged in the manufacture of shoes 
at Natick, Mass. On March 4, 1854, he es- 
tablished himself in the same line in Stone- 
ham, where he continued in business for seven 
years, in the last two of which he devoted 
considerable time to experimenting with new 
machines of his own invention. In 1859 he 
invented a machine for burnishing shoe heels, 
for which he was granted letters patent July 
23, 1861. The first manufacturer to adopt its 
use was George Haynes, of Haverhill, Mass., 
who bought the first machine in May of that 
year. It was the first successful device ever 
introduced for burnishing heels, and not only 
proved a saving of time and expense, but 
greatly expedited the work. Mr. Chamberlin 
has since been engaged in the manufacture of 
machines. He has also invented other im- 
provements in the same line, having taken out 
nine different patents, and at one time con- 
trolling as many as twenty patent rights on 
shoe machinery. In 1873 he sold a half- 
interest in his burnisher to the Tapley Heel 
Burnishing Association of Boston, and for a 
year acted as manufacturer's agent, but event- 
ually resumed business on his own account. 
Thousands of his machines have been sold, 
and are still in use. 

Mr. Chamberlin is a charter member of 
King Cyrus Lodge of Stoneham, a life mem- 
ber of Waverley Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
and of Hugh de Payens Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Melrose. He is also 
a thirty-second degree Mason, Scottish Rite, 
belonging to the Lodge of Perfection, the 
Council of Kodosh, Princes of Jerusalem, the 
Chapter of Rose Croix, and the Massachusetts 
Consistory in Boston. He is also a charter 



member of Wamscott Tribe, No. 39, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, of Stoneham, and 
of several other societies. In politics he is 
a Republican, and he cast his first Presidential 
vote for John C. Fremont in 1856. On June 
17, 1855, be was united in marriage at Natick, 
Mass., with Ellen A. Austin, of Dedham. 
She became the mother of one son, Edgar L., 
who died in 1865. Her death occurred in 
1879. On December 25, 1881, Mr. Cham- 
berlin contracted a second marriage with Mrs. 
Georgie A. Manning Elderkin, of Machias, 
Me., his present wife. In religion they are 
Congregationa lists. 



/®yo 



EORGE W. CHANEY, a well-known 
Vf^T dairy farmer of Dunstable and the 
chairman of Dunstable's Board of 
Selectmen, was born in this town, April 26, 
1858, son of William F. and Clara M. (Davis) 
Chaney. His great-grandfather, Lieutenant 
John Chaney, who is supposed to have been 
born in Newton, served in the French and Ind- 
ian War, and was probably an Ensign or a 
Lieutenant in the war of the Revolution. 
Lieutenant Chaney resided upon land leased 
from the Brinley estate for about fifty years, 
and died in 1832, at the age of ninety-six. 
He was a remarkably well-preserved and ac- 
tive man, and a family tradition says he shot 
an eagle on the pond when he was over ninety 
years old. He was three times married. 
His first wife, Sarah Farwell Chaney, died 
in January, 1776. The maiden name of his 
second wife was Elizabeth Blodgett, and that 
of his third, Elizabeth Swallow, who died in 
1S26. He was the father of thirteen children ; 
and Isaac, the grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was the only child of his third 
marriage. 

Isaac Chaney went to Washington, N. H., 
when he was twenty-five, and remained there 
about ten years. He was a cooper by trade, 
which he followed during the greater part of his 
active period; and he did a great deal of work 
in that line for the West India trade. He 
had the misfortune to lose his sight a few 
years before his death, which occurred at the 
age of eighty-six. The maiden name of his 
first wife was Susan Farwell, and that of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



second was Susanna Swallow. Mrs. Susanna 
Chaney's sister Maria, the widow of Lieuten- 
ant Francis Fletcher and now eighty -eight 
years old, resides near the village, and is the 
last of her generation. She is remarkably 
bright for her age, and has written much of 
the Fletcher genealogy. Isaac Chaney was 
the father of thirteen children. Of these, 
three sons and two daughters survive, namely : 
Asa S., who resides in Westfield, Wis. ; Will- 
iam F., the father of George W. ; Charles A., 
who lives in Chelsea, Mass. ; Phoebe, the 
widow of Cyrus Barnes, of Maiden, Mass. ; 
and Harriet, the wife of Ira Choate, of Somer- 
ville, Mass. Thomas F. , the eldest son, who 
died in 1897 at the age of ninety, was the 
first railroad station agent in Dunstable. 
This position he occupied until advancing 
years compelled him to resign. He was suc- 
ceeded by • his grand-daughter, Ethel M. 
Chaney. 

William F. Chaney, who was born in Dun- 
stable and has resided here throughout the 
greater part of his life, has been active in 
public affairs, and has served as Overseer of 
the Poor, and was superintendent of the poor 
farm at Chelmsford for four years. He mar- 
ried Clara M. Davis, daughter of Deacon 
Thaddeus Davis, of Tyngsboro. Her father 
was a regular attendant at church, missing but 
one Sunday in forty years, although it was 
five miles distant from his home. Notwith- 
standing the fact that he lived in Tyngsboro 
eighty years, he never crossed the Merrimac 
River. Mr. and Mrs. William F. Chaney 
have been the parents of six children, namely: 
Clara F., who is the wife of James Davis, and 
resides in the village; William, who died in 
infancy; Ella J., who was drowned at the age 
of sixteen; Emma J., who is the wife of Na- 
thaniel Kendall and lives in Maiden, Mass. ; 
William Everett, a machinist, who married 
Ella D. Savelle on January i, 1888, and was 
accidentally killed at the age of thirty-three, 
leaving one son, Eugene Everett; and George 
W. , the subject of this sketch. 

George W. Chaney acquired his education 
at Crosby's Academy in Nashua. He assisted 
in carrying on the farm until he was twenty- 
one years old, when he went West. At the 
expiration of two years he returned and took 



charge of the home property, which he has 
since carried on successfully. The farm con- 
tains seventy acres of fertile land, which is 
devoted to dairy farming and the raising of 
garden truck. He keeps from twelve to four- 
teen cows, and the butter made upon his farm 
is of a superior quality. In politics he sup- 
ports the Republican party. In 1888 he was 
elected a member of the Board of Selectmen, 
of which he has been chairman during three 
different years. He has also been Overseer 
of the Poor and Assessor, a member of the 
School Board for five years. Constable for six 
years, and a trustee of the library for four 
years. 

On June 2, 1884, Mr. Chaney married 
Adelia I. Hartwell, who was born in Amherst, 
N.H., daughter of Albert A. Hartwell, of 
Reading, Mass. Mrs. Chaney has had 
three children, as follows: Francis Albert, 
who died in infancy; Louis Davis, born Sep- 
tember 18, 1889; and Isabel B., born May 12, 
1892. The family attend the Congregational 
church. 



OHN NICHOLS BALL, a well-known 
manufacturer of Somerville, Mass., 
was born on November 19, 1835, in 
Antrim, N. H. His parents were Jonas 
and Roxana (Nichols) Ball ; and his paternal 
grandfather was James Ball, who was born Jan- 
uary I, 1764, in Townsend, Middlesex County, 
Mass. 

The founder of the family in New England 
was John Ball, who came from Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, and settled at Concord, Mass., in 1640. 
From him the line descended through his son 
Nathaniel and his grandson, Nathaniel, Jr., 
to Jeremiah, who married Mary Stevens, and 
settled in Townsend in 1727. Jeremiah Ball's 
son Jeremiah, an officer in the militia, known 
as Lieutenant Jeremiah Ball, married another 
Mary Stevens, and was the father of James 
above named. 

James Ball married a Miss Shattuck, of 
Townsend, and they removed to New Hamp- 
shire. They had a family of seven children, 
six boys and one girl, Jonas, mentioned above, 
being the youngest son. 

Jonas Ball, who was born in Stoddard, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



N. H., was, like his father, a New Hampshire 
farmer. He spent most of his life in Marlow. 
His wife, Roxana, was the daughter of Ben- 
jamin Nichols. 

John Nichols Ball passed his boyhood and 
youth, until seventeen years of age, in Mar- 
low, N. H., where he worked on his father's 
farm and attended the public schools. Going 
then to Nashua, N. H., he worked there for a 
year in a grocery store, and at the end of that 
time took charge of a hotel in Nashua, then 
known as the Pearl Street Flouse, now called 
the Tremont House. He remained in the 
hotel business for eight years. In 1861 he 
went to Madison, Wis., and after a two years' 
sojourn there he went to New Orleans, where 
he stayed during the succeeding eight years. 
Six years of this time he was in the employ of 
the government as Inspector of Customs and 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue. Com- 
ing in 1870 to Somerville, he became foreman 
in O. Nichols's pasted shoe stock manufactory. 
After ten years of successful management in 
the employ of this company he started a busi- 
ness of his own in the same line at 684 Broad- 
way. This concern he still operates. He 
also owns and conducts a similar business in 
Norwood, Mass. 

Mr. Ball is public-spirited, and takes a 
warm interest in everything that tends to de- 
velop the resources, industrial or commercial, 
of the city of his adoption. He has served 
two years as a member of the Common Coun- 
cil, and is at the present time a member of the 
Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Ball married Emma E., daughter of 
Benjamin Thresher, of Somerville. Of the 
four children born to them, three are now liv- 
ing, by name, Gertrude F., Edwin C. , and 
Ethel M. Mr. Ball is a member of the 
Knights of Honor. 



/TAHARLES F. PARKER and HENRY 
I VX A. PARKER, leading men of Pep- 
^'js perell and sons of Frederick F. and 

Ann (Varnum) Parker, late of this 
town, were both born on the homestead which 
is now the residence of Charles F. Their 
great-grandfather, Lemuel Parker, was born in 
Groton. The grandfather, also named Lemuel, 



who was a native of either Pepperell or 
Groton, came to this town when very young. 
His house stood a half-mile north of Pep- 
perell Centre, near Colonel Shattuck's estate; 
and he kept a store near the East village. 
Born in 1764, he died in 1827. His wife's 
maiden name was Submit Gilson. 

Fred F., only son of Samuel and Submit 
Parker, went into his father's store at the age 
of nineteen, and subsequently managed it 
until his death. In the course of his life he 
acquired a large property, situated in Brook- 
line and other towns. He also dealt much in 
real estate. At his death so extensive were 
his interests, that it took four years to settle 
his estate. He was connected with the mili- 
tary service, and was an ow.ner of the stage 
route business, which was an important enter- 
prise in those days. His residence was the 
home where his son Charles now resides. He 
built what is known as the Bee Hive at East 
village, and which is still owned in the fam- 
ily. His wife, Ann, was a grand-daughter of 
Jonas Varnum and a daughter of Jonas Spauld- 
ing Varnum. The original Varnum settle- 
ment was in the centre of the town, opposite 
the present site of the high-school building. 
Ann survived her husband, who died May 25, 
1841, until March 25, 1886, giving her atten- 
tion to settling the estate and to the educa- 
tion and training of her children. Besides 
the two sons already mentioned, she had a 
daughter, Harriet E., who now lives with her 
brother Charles. 

Charles F. Parker, born November 22, 
1836, was only five years old at the time of 
his father's death. His mother lived on the 
homestead, and his home was always with 
her. She retained a considerable amount of 
real estate, thinking it would advance in val- 
uation, and that her sons when grown would 
have a valuable farm. She even bought some 
tracts of land to add to the estate. Charles 
was not strong when a child. He acquired 
the elements of a practical education at 
Perry's Family School. Early in life he en- 
gaged in farming, which has since been his 
principal occupation. Soon after he bought 
out his brother's interest in the farm, together 
with the Bee Hive and the old homestead, 
which is a handsome residence of ten rooms. 




NATHANIEL T. ALLEN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He also owns five other houses, and has a 
handsome income, Mr. Parker has never 
married. He is well informed on current 
events and on political and social questions, 
hut has never cared to enter the arena of poli- 
tics or to become a candidate for political pre- 
ferment. 

Henry A. Parker, born July 17, 1832, 
bought in i860 the property he now owns, 
and on which there was then nothing but a 
paper-mill. After rebuilding the mill, he 
began paper-making, and also put up a saw- 
mill, which he has since operated. He car- 
ries on a general lumber trade, doing planing 
and sawing, and clearing large tracts of tim- 
ber land. The grist-mill upon his estate is 
also in active operation. He employs from 
six to fifteen hands, and in addition to his 
regular business has done considerable build- 
ing, having at present about a dozen houses 
which he rents. At the age of nineteen he 
went to California, and was there from 1852 
to 1856. In religious belief Mr. Parker is a 
Unitarian. While a Democrat in politics, he 
votes for the candidate who is the best man 
for local ofifices. In 1862 he married Mrs. 
Abbie V. Jewett, whose maiden name was 
Parker. They have one son, Frederick Henry 
Parker, who works with his father. Frederick 
married Mabel N. Fuller, of Leominster, and 
now has one child. Mrs. Henry Parker and 
her son are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 



lATHANIEL TOPLIFF ALLEN, 
one of the veteran educators of New 
England, has been at the head of 
the West Newton English and 
Classical School for nearly half a century. 
Son of Ellis Allen, he was born September 
29, 1823, in Medfield, Mass., and is a lineal 
descendant in the seventh generation of James 
Allen, one of the founders of the town. 

His paternal grandfather, Phineas Allen, 
was born in Medfield in 1764, being the 
fourth in direct line of descent whose birth- 
place was the Allen homestead. Enlisting in 
the Revolutionary army in 1780, when but 
sixteen years old, he was at West Point at the 
time of Arnold's treason and Andre's execu- 



tion, later sharing the sufferings of the patriot 
forces in New Jersey ; and after the close of 
the war he reached home in an almost ex- 
hausted condition, having traversed the entire 
distance of about three hundred miles on foot. 
He married Ruth Smith, of Walpole, and was 
the father of eight children. Abigail, the 
eldest of these, died February 22, 1796, in 
her eighth year. After that date there was no 
death in the family for seventy-seven years, 
the first of the remaining seven to depart 
being Joseph Allen, D.D., of Northboro, on 
February 23, 1873. Noah Allen, the young- 
est son and last survivor of the household, is 
now (May, 1898) living in Medfield in his 
ninety-second year. 

Ellis Allen, the second son of Phineas, was 
born at the Medfield homestead in 1792, and 
died at West Newton in 1874. During his 
active life he was successfully engaged in 
farming in his native town. He was a man of 
prominence in politics, a strong abolitionist, 
and an intimate friend of William Lloyd 
Garrison. He married Lucy Lane, who was 
born in Scituate, Mass., in 1793, a daughter 
of Captain Benjamin Lane. She died at 
West Newton in 1889. Their children are: 
William C. Allen, now in his eighty-fourth 
year; George E. Allen, who died in his 
seventy-second year; Joseph A. Allen, of 
Medfield, now in his eightieth year; Lucy M. 
Allen Davis, in her seventy-seventh year; Na- 
thaniel T. Allen, of West Newton, now in his 
seventy-fifth year; Fanny L. Allen, who died 
in her sixth year; Abigail E. Allen Davis, 
who died in her sixty-ninth year; and James 
T. Allen, now in his sixty-seventh year. 

■ Nathaniel T. Allen, the fourth son and the 
subject of this biography, obtained his early 
education in the common schools of Medfield, 
the family school of his uncle, the Rev. Jo- 
seph Allen, at Northboro, Mass., and the 
academy at Northfield. Of manual labor he 
had some experience on the ancestral farm and 
in a Waltham cotton-mill. Having decided 
to become a teacher, he prepared himself by 
attending the Bridgewater Normal School, 
where he was graduated in 1846, taking a 
further course of study at the Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute, Troy, N.Y. He had pre- 
viously, in 1842, taught school in Mansfield. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He afterward taught winter terms of school in 
Northboro, Northfield, and Shrewsbury, and 
during the season he taught a singing-school 
in each of those towns. In the spring of 1848 
Mr. Allen, by appointment of Horace Mann, 
secretary of the State Board of Education, 
came to West Newton as head of the model 
department of the Normal School, of which 
the Rev. Cyrus Pierce was principal. This 
school, originally located at Lexington, 
Mass., was the first Normal School in this 
country, and the first in the world for training 
women teachers. About six years later the 
Normal School was removed to Framingham; 
and Mr. Allen then, in 1854, in connection 
with the Rev. Cyrus Pierce, opened the Eng- 
lish and Classical School at West Newton 
which has been carried on by the Allen 
Brothers with signal success from the very 
first. The school has now an average attend- 
ance of seventy-five pupils; and twelve 
teachers are employed, the students being 
fitted for admission to any college. 

In 1869 Mr. Allen, as agent for Henry 
Barnard, LL. D., United States Commissioner 
of Education at Washington, D. C, went 
abroad with his family, and remained two 
years. He visited the principal schools of 
England, France, and Germany, making a 
special study of the system and methods em- 
ployed in each ; and his report on the schools 
of Germany was published by the department 
at Washington. In his early years he was a 
Whig, later a Free Soiler and Republican, 
and was always a strong supporter of the anti- 
slavery party. He is now independent in 
politics. For twenty years he has been a 
member of the American Peace Society, for 
fifteen years being an officer thereof. 

For the past twenty-five years he has been 
president of the Board of Directors for the 
Pomroy Home for Orphans and Destitute 
Girls. He is ex-president of the Bridgewater 
Normal School Association, a member of the 
National Teachers' Association, of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Instruction, and of many 
other educational organizations. In 1896 he 
went to Washington, D.C., as a delegate to 
the Arbitration Convention of the Friends of 
Peace. He is ex-president of the Newton 
Woman's Suffrage Association. He is a Uni- 



tarian in his religious faith and affiliation, and 
has been superintendent of the Sunday-school 
connected with the church of that denomina- 
tion in West Newton. 

Mr. Allen was married to Caroline Swift, 
daughter of James Nye and Rebecca (Free- 
man) Bassett, of Nantucket, on March 30, 
1853. They are the parents of five children, 
two of whom died in infancy, one a son, Na- 
thaniel T. , who lived but a few months. 
Fannie B., born in 1862, the elder of the two 
now living, was educated in the Allen School 
and at private schools, and, having taught 
some years with her father, is now at home. 
Sarah Caroline, born in 1864, was educated in 
her father's school and at the Froebel Normal 
Kindergarten Institute in Washington, D.C., 
being graduated from there in 1881, after 
which she taught twelve years prior to her 
marriage with P. Henry Cooney, Esq., of Na- 
tick. She died November 4, 1897. Lucy 
Ellis Allen, born in 1872, was graduated at 
Smith College in 1889, and has since taught 
in the Allen English and Classical School. 



§OHN W. DRAKE, a leading resident 
of Dunstable, now chiefly engaged in 
farming, was born in this town in 
183s, son of John W. and Edith Smith 
(Robbins) Drake. His maternal grandfather 
served with credit as a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion. This ancestor had three sons — Will- 
ard, Elijah, and Jotham. Elijah settled in 
this town, Jotham in New Hampshire, and 
Willard on his father's farm, which lay on the 
border line between New Hampshire and Mas- 
sachusetts, and which has always been owned 
by a Robbins. The present owner is Andrew, 
a brother of Freeman Robbins. Willard Rob- 
bins lived on this farm until his death in 
1847, at the age of seventy-nine. His wife 
had died some years previously. Their chil- 
dren were as follows: Willard (second), who 
settled where W. E. Blood now lives, and 
died at the age of sixty-two; Moody, who 
lived in Dunstable until past sixty; Jotham, 
who died at the age of seventy-seven ; Sewall, 
who died young; Micah, who lived in Dun- 
stable and in Tyngsboro, and died at the age 
of sixty-one; Rebecca, who married Josiah T. 



Biographical review 



Cummings; Cynthia, who died unmarried at 
the age of fifty; and PIdith, the mother of Mr. 
Drake. Edith was born on the old Robbins 
farm, and was living there at the time her son 
John was born. She afterward married Jona- 
than Parker, and resided on the site of the 
present residence of John W. She died here 
at the age of seventy-nine years, and Mr. 
Parker died at the age of eighty-eight. 

John W. Drake, the subject of this sketch, 
passed his youth on the Robbins farm. When 
eighteen years old he bought his present 
homestead, then known as the Silas Blood 
farm, paying one hundred dollars down. Be- 
ginning at the age of thirteen, he worked as a 
farm hand until he was twenty years old, mak- 
ing a home for his mother and assisting in her 
support. When twenty years old, he began 
railroading, going first as section hand at Pep- 
perell, remaining there for two and one-half 
years, and then going to Clinton on section 
work. Then he went to Worcester on the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, and became fore- 
man of a section crew. Having spent two 
years and a half in the Worcester yard, he re- 
turned to Clinton, and had charge of the sec- 
tion there for eight years. He was then on 
construction trains, making his headquarters 
at Clinton and attending to all repairs along 
the road. Later he returned to Worcester, 
and had charge of the train and men, building 
a double track for about eighteen miles. He 
then had charge of the Nashua & Rochester 
Railroad, laying the track on that line, and 
remaining until the work was finished in July, 
1875. This completed about twenty years of 
railroad work, after which Mr. Drake retired 
to his farm, upon which he has since made 
many improvements. While in the railroad 
business he had large numbers of men under 
his charge, sometimes as many as three hun- 
dred ; and his skill in controlling them made 
him a most valuable foreman. 

On December 24, 1862, Mr. Drake was 
married at Groton, Mass., to Miss Mary I. 
Bennett, daughter of Jonathan and Miranda 
Harrington Bennett, of Pepperell. Mr. and 
Mrs. Drake's children were: Harry, Edith, 
and Herbert, all of whom died in infancy; 
and Lizzie W., born November 15, 1872, who 
has lived at home. She is a refined and able 



lady. In politics Mr. Drake is a Democrat. 
He was made a Mason at Dorcas Lodge of 
Hudson, Mass. He is an ardent sportsman 
and a most successful hunter and fisherman. 



§OHN H. GOODELL, a wealthy pro- 
vision dealer of Framingham, was born 
in Southbridge, Mass., in 1851, son 
of Hosea B. and Harriet C. (Fiske) 
Goodell. He is a descendant of Robert 
Goodell, who settled in Salem, Mass., in 
1632. His great-grandfather, Asa Goodell, 
who died in 183 1, commanded a company 
during the war of the Revolution, and was 
at Ticonderoga and at Valley Forge. Asa 
Goodell, Jr., was a prominent man in Wood- 
stock, Conn. He was a Selectman for five 
years, holding that office throughout the war 
of the Rebellion. He gave one son to the 
cause of the Union, Joseph, of the Seventh 
Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, who was 
killed at Fort Donelson, and a son-in-law, 
Wallace C. Smith, who was shot in an en- 
gagement that took place a few days later. 
Hosea B., the father of the subject of this 
sketch, in early life a well-known resident 
of Southbridge, lived for twenty-five years 
in North Brookfield, where he died in 1876. 
He married a daughter of Deacon Moses 
Fiske, of Sturbridge. 

John H. Goodell, at seventeen years of age, 
learned the machinist's trade in the city of 
Lowell, Mass., and later spent a year in the 
State of Wisconsin. In 1869 he engaged in 
the meat business in North Brookfield, and 
afterward followed it for thirteen years. 
Coming to Framingham in 1882, he bought 
the stand of Willard A. Swan, which he has 
conducted since. His business, both whole- 
sale and retail, employing twelve men, 
amounts to more than one hundred thousand 
dollars annually. Dealing in meats, butter, 
eggs, and poultry, he sends teams through the 
Newtons, Marlboro, Foxboro, Southboro, Na- 
tick, Milford, and other towns. 

In 1872 Mr. Goodell married Emma F. 
Carleton, of West Springfield, a relation of 
the famous Pillsbury family of Minneapolis, 
Minn., and a cousin of C. A. Pillsbury, of 
"Pillsbury's Best" fame. Mrs. Goodell is 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



well known in Framingham, and is a member 
of the O. E. S., Daughters of Rebecca, and 
other social clubs. Her children are: Juva, 
Florence C, and Robert. Juva is now the 
wife of Arthur V. Harrington, the treasurer of 
the Framingham Savings Bank, who was for- 
merly the cashier of the Westboro National 
Bank. Florence C. is a graduate of the Fra- 
mingham High School. Robert is also a 
graduate of the high school, class of 1898. 

Mr. Goodell was chairman of the Board of 
Overseers of the Poor in 1887-88. A Select- 
man for six years, he was chairman of the 
board for two years of the period. He was 
chairman of the Sewer Commissioners for 
seven years, and it was largely through his 
efforts that Framingham's extensive sewer sys- 
tem was adopted. He is a member of the 
Middlesex Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of Framing- 
ham Lodge, No. 45 ; and Waushakum En- 
campment, No. 52, L O. O. F. ; of Netus 
Tribe, No. 43, L O. R. M. ; and he is Past 
Chancellor Commander of Pericles Lodge, 
K. of P. 



lEpREEMAN LUTHER ROBBINS, a 
PI prosperous general farmer of Dun- 
-*- stable, Middlesex County, was born in 
Dunstable, N. H. (now Nashua), April 2, 
1825, son of Luther and Mary (Newton) Rob- 
bins. His grandfather, Jotham Robbins, was 
a resident of Dunstable, N.H., as was also 
Luther Robbins, who died there at the age 
of eighty-two years. Mrs. Luther Robbins 
was a representative of the Stowe family, 
and, it is said, a descendant of one of three 
brothers of Glasgow, Scotland, who, upon 
being pressed into the English naval service, 
obtained their liberty by paying a fee, and 
emigrated to America. 

When he was twenty-three years old, Free- 
man Luther Robbins came to Dunstable, 
Mass., where he was employed for about six 
years, or until his marriage. He spent the 
next two years in Nashua, N.H. In April, 
1857, he purchased his present farm, which 
he has tilled with energy and success for the 
past forty years. Politically, he is a Demo- 
crat. He has taken an active interest in pub- 
lic affairs, and served as Selectman for eleven 



years. He has also been an Assessor and an 
Overseer of the Poor. During his connection 
with public affairs he was mainly instrumental 
in relieving the town from debt. He has 
been Moderator at town meetings for many 
years, and he was frequently a delegate to con- 
ventions of his party. 

On December 14, 1854, Mr. Robbins was 
united in marriage with Sarah A. Wheeler, 
who was born in Nashua, N.H., November 
19, 1831, daughter of Oilman and Hannah 
(Hood) Wheeler, the former of whom was a 
boatman. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins are the par- 
ents of four children, namely: Luther Gil- 
man,' a resident of Pepperell; Freeman Fred; 
Mary Elizabeth; and Clarence Guy. Free- 
man Fred, who is now a carpenter in Dunsta- 
ble, has served for three years as a Selectman. 
Mary Elizabeth, who graduated from the Fram- 
ingham Normal School, is now an assistant 
teacher there. On June 11, 1897, Clarence 
Guy graduated from Tufts College Divinity 
School. He was ordained at Tufts College,- 
June 14, 1897, and installed as pastor of the 
First Universalist Church in Leominster, 
Mass., June 21, 1897, where he is now in 
charge. He is a young man of much ability. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Robbins are Universalists. 



ATHAN BARKER, one of the oldest 
and most highly esteemed residents of 
Sudbury, was born in Beverly, 
Mass., September 8, 1809. His 
parents, Nathan and Sally (Brown) Barker, 
were natives of Sudbury. 

Nathan Barker, Sr., was a son of Ephraim 
and Ruth (Goodnow) Barker. A brickmaker 
by trade, he started in business in Sudbury, 
and subsequently went into a new yard in 
Charlestown. This failed in two years, and 
he removed to Beverly. His last days were 
spent in Medford, Mass. He was married in 
Sudbury to Sally, daughter of John Brown. 
Her mother was a sister of Adam Howe, for 
forty years the proprietor of the famous old 
"Howe Tavern," or "Red Horse Tavern," 
Longfellow's "Wayside Inn." The old 
Brown house now standing at the foot of Nob- 
scot Hill was the hostelry. The estate is 
only a part of the original Howe homestead. 




NATHAN BARKER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



Hubbard Brown, one of John Brown's descend- 
ants, is now residing there. Mrs. Barker 
died in Sudbury when her son Nathan, the 
subject of this sketch, was only two and a half 
years old. She left two other children: 
Ruth, wife of John Eaton, of Sudbury; and 
Amri, who went to sea and is supposed to 
have died in Mexico at the time of the Mexi- 
can War. When last heard from Amri 
Barker was in school at Vera Cruz. Nathan 
Barker, Sr. , after the, death of his first wife 
married Hannah Townsend, by whom he had 
nine children. Her grave is in Medford. 

Nathan Barker, after his mother's death, 
went to live with his grandmother in the 
south-eastern part of Sudbury, and was with 
her until he was seventeen years old. At the 
age of thirteen he had worked for eight 
months, receiving four dollars and a half a 
month. The following year he was paid five 
dollars, and the year after he received nine 
dollars a month. In his nineteenth year he 
took charge of the General Derby farm in 
Weston. The General, who was a sailor as 
well as a soldier, was very old, and was living 
retired on his farm. He knew very little 
about farming, and left most of the responsi- 
bility to Mr. Barker, who hired the men and 
attended largely to the marketing. His salary 
here was one hundred and fifty dollars per year. 
There was but one other man in Weston re- 
ceiving as much. Mr. Barker was with Gen- 
eral Derby four years. The eight years ensu- 
ing he drove a bread cart for Mr. Pierce, a 
baker of Weston, supplying the farming dis- 
tricts, and largely increasing Mr. Pierce's 
business. In the meantime he was saving 
money, and he invested one thousand dollars 
in a new rubber factory at South Framingham. 
He went to work in the factory himself. A 
year later the concern failed, and Mr. Barker 
went to Staten Island, starting a large factory 
there, in which his uncle was interested. He 
next engaged in butchering in Newton, and 
for two years managed a successful business. 
Selling to good advantage, he became a part- 
ner of his old employer, Mr. Pierce, of Wes- 
ton. He took charge of the outside work, 
driving the cart. He was one year with the 
elder Mr. Pierce and three years with his son. 

In 1844 General Derby died, and Mr. 



Barker purchased his farm for seven thousand 
dollars. This farm was just south of Weston, 
and covered one hundred and ninety-two 
acres. Mr. Barker subsequently sold a part 
of it, which is now owned by Banker Case. 
He was successfully engaged in general farm- 
ing, dairying, and stock-raising, until 1896, 
over fifty years. He fatted and sold cattle, 
pasturing them in New Hampshire, and as a 
drover had the most extensive business in this 
part of the county. On the farm he set out 
extensive orchards, and made many improve- 
ments. The old place is now divided into 
building lots. In 1896 he sold the farm, pur- 
chased a neat little home in Sudbury, and has 
since lived retired. Mr. Barker is a member 
of agricultural societies in Concord and 
Worcester. 

In 1833 he was married to Elizabeth 
Hazen, who died thirty- nine years after her 
marriage, having been the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : Elizabeth, who died at the 
age of twenty-one; Lucy, who died at the age 
of nineteen; Henry, who died at the age of 
seventeen; Nathan, who lives in Weston on 
part of the old farm; Mary, wife of Oliver 
Sherburn, foreman on General Paine's farm; 
and Amri, who resides on a part of the Derby 
farm at Weston. The three older children 
died at intervals of two years, and the mother 
a year after the death of the last one. Five 
years after his first wife's death Mr. Barker 
was married to Miss Emily Nelson, of Worces- 
ter. He has no children by his second wife. 

In politics Mr. Barker is a Democrat, a 
member of the unpopular party in this sec- 
tion. He was nominated for Representative 
fifteen times in succession, but failed of elec- 
tion. He has served as chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen. In 181 7 Mr. Barker joined the 
Wadsworth Guards, a Sudbury rifle company. 
In the seventy years that have passed since 
that time all his old comrades have dropped 
away, and he is probably the only survivor. 
He was a member for five years, punctually 
attending the May training and the fall mus- 
ter; and he takes pride in the remembrance 
that at one muster, when they were inspected 
by old Major-general Butler, the company 
numbered eighty-four men, including nineteen 
musicians, without counting officers. Mr. 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Barker was in line of promotion, but his 
means were not sucli as to admit of his main- 
taining the expense incumbent on an officer. 



UMPHREY BRIGHAM, a retired 
business man of Hudson, was born 
in Marlboro, Mass., January 5, 
1830. A son of Ashley and Mary 
(Bigelow) Brigham, both natives of Marlboro, 
he is descended in a direct line from Thomas 
Brigham, who, when he was thirty-two years 
old, sailed from London, April 18, 1635, on 
board the ship "Susan and Ellyn," Edward 
Payne master. After his arrival in New 
England, Thomas Brigham settled on land 
near the Cambridge line, which was after- 
ward included within the limits of Cambridge. 
He was made a freeman in 1639, was chosen 
a Selectman in 1640, and he died December 
18, 1653. In 1637 he wedded Mercy Hurd, a 
native of England, who was again married, 
and died in 1693. Samuel Brigham, son of 
Thomas, was born January 12, 1652. He lo- 
cated in Marlboro, where he built a tannery a 
short distance east of the old Meeting-house 
Common, and was probably the first tanner in 
that town. He died in July, 1713, and the 
tannery was operated by his descendants for 
several generations. The maiden name of his 
wife was Elizabeth Howe, and she died July 
26, 1739, aged seventy-nine years. Jedediah 
Brigham, son of Samuel, was born June 8, 
1693. He succeeded to the ownership of the 
homestead and tannery, which he carried on, 
and also owned land in Princeton, Bolton, and 
Lancaster, Mass. He died May 21, 1763. 
On May 18, 1720, he married Bethiah, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Howe, and she died June 23, 
1756. 

Winslow Brigham, son of Jedediah and 
great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Marlboro, August 3, 
1736. He inherited the homestead and tan- 
nery. One of the most popular and influen- 
tial men of his day, he was Town Clerk for 
thirteen years, was frequently elected a Select- 
man, and he represented the town in the Gen- 
eral Court several terms. On July 29, 1760, 
he married Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel 
Harrington. He died October 25, 1S15, aged 



seventy-nine years. Major Jedediah Brig- 
ham, or "Major Jed," as he was familiarly 
known, grandfather of Humphrey Brigham, 
was born at the homestead, September 15, 
1766. He was an extensive farmer, owning 
seven hundred acres of land bordering on the 
main road for a mile; and as town officer and 
Representative to the legislature he acquired 
considerable distinction. H^is wife, Lydia, a 
daughter of William Boyd, died April 28, 
1824. Ashley Brigham, Humphrey Brig- 
ham's father, was born in Marlboro, October 
12, 1S04. He was reared upon the home 
farm, and, when a young man, engaged as a 
contractor, building bridges, roads, cellars, 
etc. He was the principal stone work con- 
tractor in Marlboro for many years, and much 
of his work exists in that and the neighboring 
towns. The last ten years of his life were 
spent in retirement, and he died in 1881. He 
possessed a persistency of purpose that enabled 
him to accomplish whatever he undertook, 
and was well informed upon current topics. 
Ashley Brigham wedded Mary Bigelow, a 
daughter of Ephraim Bigelow. Their chil- 
dren were: William Emerson, who is no 
longer living; Lydia, now the wife of Lewis 
H. Allen, of Rock Bottom; Humphrey, the 
subject of this sketch; Marilla, the widow of 
Frank Morse, late of Marlboro, Mass. ; Mari- 
etta, who married William Barnes, of Marl- 
boro; Ashley; and Octavia. Mrs. Ashley 
Brigham was a member of the Congregational 
church. 

Humphrey Brigham attended the public 
schools of Marlboro until he was twelve years 
old, at which time he was apprenticed to a 
blacksmith, and remained with him until 
reaching the age of eighteen. He then 
learned shoemaking; and before he was 
twenty-one he engaged in business for him- 
self, in partnership with Thomas J. Howe, 
with whom he was associated four years. 
Then, selling his interest to his partner, he 
went to Rock Bottom, and a few months later 
formed a partnership with Dennison Brigham 
under the firm name of D. & H. Brigham, and 
carried on business for ten years. For five 
years he was associated with Augustus Rice 
in the firm Brigham & Rice. He subse- 
quently conducted business alone until the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



burning of his factory in 1875, since which 
time he has lived in retirement in Hudson. 
As a business man he gave close attention to 
the management of his enterprises, which were 
developed and made profitable solely through 
his excellent judgment. At the time of his 
retirement he employed from seventy-five to 
one hundred men, and he was turning out five 
hundred pairs of shoes per day. 

Mr. Brigham is a member of Doric Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; of Hudson Lodge, L O. O. F. ; 
and of the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 
He married Ellen A. Gleason, daughter of 
Benjamin W. Gleason, of Rock Bottom, and 
has had three children, namely: Frank L., 
who is no longer living; Whitney G., of Hud- 
son; and Louisa G., the ivife of John M. 
Louis, of this town. Mr. Brigham attends 
the Baptist church, of which Mrs. Brigham is 
a member. 



§OHN MASON CARPENTER, of 
Marlboro, an enterprising dealer in 
ready-made clothing and gentlemen's 
furnishing goods, was born in Milford, 
Mass., August 7, 1859, son of Byron and Jane 
A. (Mason) Carpenter. He is a descendant 
in the ninth generation of the founder of the 
Carpenter family in America, and traces his 
genealogy as follows: Byron, son of Seth 
Prime, son of Reuben, son of Elisha, son of 
Noah, son of William (third), son of William 
(second), son of William (first). William 
Carpenter (first), born in England in 1576, 
left Harwell for Southampton, where he took 
passage on board the ship "Revis" in 1638, 
and arrived in Boston or the vicinity in the 
same year. He brought with him his son 
William and four grand-children, all of whom 
were under ten years old. William Carpenter 
(second), who was born in 1605, settled first 
in Weymouth. In 1643 or 1644 he moved to 
Rehoboth, Mass. His wife, Abigail, was 
born in England in 1606; and his son, Will- 
iam Carpenter (third) was born there in 
1630. William Carpenter (third) resided in 
Rehoboth until his death, which occurred Au- 
gust 2, 1689. He was twice married, and 
reared a large family of children. Elisha 
Carpenter, grandson of William (third), re- 



sided in Attleboro, Mass. His son Reuben, 
great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in this town, P^ebruary 23, 
1757. Reuben settled in Milford, Mass., 
where he became a prominent and useful citi- 
zen, and resided there for the rest of his life. 
In 1776 he married Sally Fuller. 

Seth Prime Carpenter, grandfather of John 
M., was born in Milford, November 25, 1802. 
He was one of the first persons to engage in 
the manufacture of shoes in his native town, 
and he sold his products in the Western States 
previous to the building of railroads. He 
was prominently identified with public affairs, 
holding various town offices; and he was one 
of the prime movers in securing the construc- 
tion of the Milford & Framingham Branch 
Railway. In his later years he devoted his 
time and ingenuity to the breeding of trout, 
and maintained at his own expense an estab- 
lishment for that purpose in Uxbridge, Mass. 
He married for his first wife Maria Barker, 
who, born in Milford, July g, 1806, daughter 
of James and Nancy (Parks) Barker, died Feb- 
ruary 12, 1 83 1, leaving one son, Byron. He 
wedded for his second wife Diana, his first 
wife's sister, born March 31, 1808. Of this 
union there were born six children, as follows: 
Reuben Earl, March 26, 1832; George W., 
July 28, 1834, who died August 10, 1837; 
Hannah Maria, August 16, 1836, who died 
July 24, 1843; Dennis, March i, 1845; 
Nancy Marion, March 19, 1847- and Hannah 
Maria (second), June 20, 1850. Reuben Earl 
Carpenter married Eunice Fisher, and resides 
in Ashland, Mass. Nancy Marion Carpenter 
married Charles Henry Metcalf. 

Byron Carpenter, John M. Carpenter's 
father, was born in Milford, September 14, 
1829. After leaving school he learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and, when a young man, 
became associated with his father in the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes, following that busi- 
ness imtil his death, which occurred March 
15, 1872. Jane A. Mason Carpenter, his 
wife, whom he married October 25, 1849, was 
born in Milford, June 4, 1831, daughter of 
John and Sally (Wheeler) Mason. She be- 
came the mother of nine children, as follows: 
Jennie Lind, born March 20, 1851, who mar- 
ried Frederick T. King; Seth Prime, born 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



April 7, 1853, who died January 25, 1877; 
Arabella Mason, born July 6, 1855, who 
married Eugene T. Walker; Mattie Wheeler, 
born September 14, 1857; John M., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Reuben Earl, born July 
28, 1861; Walter Hachelder, born September 
10, 1863; Grace Georgiana, born February 
10, 1865; and Maud C. Carpenter, born Sep- 
tember 7, 1866. 

Having acquired a public-school education, 
John Mason Carpenter entered the clothing 
business as a clerk. In 1878 he visited Den- 
ver, Col., for the purpose of benefitting his 
health, which was somewhat impaired. Upon 
his return a year later, he took a position in a 
clothing store in Marlboro, remaining here 
two years. For the succeeding five years he 
was employed in the same business in Boston. 
Returning to Marlboro in 1886, he opened a 
large and well-stocked clothing and gentle- 
men's furnishing store, which he has since 
carried on successfully. 

Mr. Carpenter was formerly a commissioned 
officer in the State militia, having served as 
Quartermaster of the Sixth Regiment for five 
years. He is a member of United Brethren 
Lodge, F. & A. M.; of Houghton Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; of Trinity Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of Hudson; of Aleppo 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine, Boston; of the 
Lodge of Perfection, of Worcester, Mass. ; and 
of the Union Club of this city. On April i, 
1882, he was united in marriage with Marion 
L. West, daughter of Prescott West, of Marl- 
boro. He has two sons — Seth P. and John 
M. Carpenter. 



HE FELCH FAMILY, from which 
Fclchville, the oldest and for many 
years the most important part of the 
town of Natick, derived its name, has been 
prominent in this part of Middlesex County 
since Ebenezer Felch, the fourth white settler 
of Natick, located here. Born in Reading, 
Mass., in 1701, he married Mary Bacon, of 
Needham, on May 15, 1728. The records of 
Natick show that in 1731 and 1732 he re- 
ceived the annual stipend of four pounds for 
his services as teacher. His house, in the 
northern part of the town, occupied the pres- 



ent site of the spacious residence of O. A. 
Felch. The said Ebenezer Felch was first 
elected Town Clerk in 1745, and he afterward 
served in that capacity for fifteen consecutive 
years. A man of piety, he was for some years 
a Deacon in the church of John Eliot, the 
apostle to the Indians. His old homestead 
property has never been out of the possession 
of the family. 

John Felch, one of the four children of 
Ebenezer, succeeded his father as Town Clerk, 
and was also a teacher in the public schools. 
In August, 1756, he married Mary Bacon. 
He was enrolled as a minute-man in June, 
1776, and he was killed at the battle of White 
Plains, October 28, 1776. He left six chil- 
dren, namely: Molly, born in 1757, who mar- 
ried Thomas Coolidge; John, born May 29, 
1760, who married Llannah Loker; Ruth, 
born in 1762, who became the wife of James 
Fames; Zeruiah, born April 30, 1765, who 
married Ethel Jennings May 18, 17S6; and 
Asa and Levi. 

Asa Felch, son of John, born July 9, 1769, 
married Lavinia Newton. Their children 
were: John, born May 6, 1794, who married 
Sarah Robinson; Mary, born May 19, 1796, 
who married the Rev. Isaac Jennison; Martha, 
born October 6, 1798, who married John Jen- 
nings; Ann, born March i, 1801, who married 
Asa Brigham Childs, of Needham; Asa, born 
February 2, 1803, who was a shoe manufact- 
urer, and successively married Nancy Badger 
and Ellen Haven; and Isaac, born December 
14, 1805. 

Isaac Felch had more than ordinary ability, 
and was one of the most energetic men of his 
time. In his early manhood he conducted an 
express business, with four, six, or eight 
horses, on the route from Providence, R.I., by 
Boston, to Bellows Falls, Vt. In 1832 he 
returned to Natick, and was there successfully 
engaged in the manufacture of shoes until the 
financial crash of 1857, when so many promi- 
nent firms were obliged to suspend business. 
The Felch family is credited with the honor of 
having established the first shoe manufactory 
in Natick. Isaac F'elch served frequently as 
Selectman, and was the last man to discharge 
the duties of that ofifice without pay. In 1855 
and 1S56 he represented his district in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



State legislature. On May 3, 1826, he mar- 
ried Keziah Kimball, who bore him six chil- 
dren. These were : Lucy E., Isaac K., Sarah 
G. , Henry F., Charlotte K., and Laura E. 
Isaac Felch died October 8, 1888, and his 
wife on October 19, 1892. 

Sarah G. Felch, born June 2, 1836, who 
makes her home in Felchville, is a woman of 
literary tastes and accomplishments. For 
thirty-five years she was an honored and suc- 
cessful teacher, having commenced her profes- 
sional labors at an age when most girls are 
entering the high school. She had taught for 
a brief time in Chicago, when, at the earnest 
solicitation of her mother, who disliked ex- 
ceedingly to have her so far from home, she 
resigned her position in that city and returned 
East. Afterward she was employed in the 
schools of Wellesley for three years and in 
those of Natick for the remainder of the 
thiity-five years referred to. Having had for 
scholars in her last terms the children of 
pupils of her first terms, she began to feel 
that it was time to think of retiring. 

Henry F. Felch, born March 18, 1839, 
after spending a part of his younger days in 
Lawrence, Kan., returned as far East as New 
York, ■ where he was located when the Civil 
War broke out. Having no family dependent 
upon him, he felt it his duty to go to the front 
with the first volunteers; but the death of a 
favorite sister at that time delayed his enlist- 
ment until August, 1862, when he joined the 
Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry 
as a private. He was in every engagement 
participated in by his regiment; was suc- 
cessively promoted to the ranks of Corporal, 
Sergeant, and Color Sergeant; and he received 
from Governor Andrew the commissions of 
Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, and Cap- 
tain. A bullet received in the shoulder, at 
the battle of Walden Railroad, sent him to 
the hospital, and probably saved him from the 
fate that subsequently befell so many of his 
brave comrades. At the close of the war he 
returned to Natick, and went into the poultry 
business in company with his brother, Isaac 
K. Felch, a noted poultryman. Their success 
has made the brothers known in every State in 
the Union, and they have often been called 
upon from various parts of the country to serve 



as judges at poultry exhibits. On February 6, 
1866, Henry F. Felch married Martha A. 
Clough. They have two children : Carrie, 
born March 3, 1867; and Mattie R., born No- 
vember 12, i86q. 



T^HARLES WILLIAM STONE, the 
I Ky assistant cashier of the Revere Na- 
^U^ tional Bank, Boston, was born in 
Watertown, where he now resides, 
December 23, 183 1, son of William C. and 
Mary (Houghton) Stone. His grandparents, 
Asa and Mary (Coolidge) Stone, were natives 
of Watertown. Asa served in the War of 
1812, and was for many years employed at the 
United States Arsenal in Watertown. He 
died at the age of eighty-four years. His 
wife, who was a woman of unusual energy and 
industry, lived to be ninety-two. They were 
the parents of nine children, of whom the sur- 
vivors are Lucy C. and Ann Maria. Lucy C. , 
who is the widow of Thomas Lincoln, has 
seven children — Francis F., George H., 
Emma B. , Thomas, Lydia Maria, Richard J., 
and Charles H. Ann Maria, who is the wife 
of Samuel C. Smith, has had five children — ■ 
Samuel, Jasper, and Albert, living; and 
Charles and Frank, deceased. William C. 
Stone, son of Asa, was born in Watertown in 
May, 1808; and his wife, Mary, was born in 
Hubbardston, Mass., in the same year. He 
followed the trade of a chair painter for a num- 
ber of years, and later in life he kept a store. 
He died at the age of seventy-two years. His 
wife, who is now eighty-nine years old, resides 
with her children. She is a member of the 
Baptist church. 

Charles William Stone acquired his educa- 
tion in his native town, and at an early age 
began as a clerk in a store. In 1S55 he be- 
came clerk in the old Suffolk Bank, Boston ; 
and, when the Revere Bank was organized in 
1859, he was appointed its paying teller. He 
has since been identified with that well-known 
institution, being at the present time the as- 
sistant cashier. His record of nearly forty 
years of faithful service in the employment of 
one corporation may well be a source of pride 
to him. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was a member of the Board of Selectmen for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



one year, and has served in all twenty-one 
years upon the School Board. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason, having been Worshipful IVIaster 
of Pecjuossette Lodge, Watertown, in 1 868 and 
i86g; and he has been officially connected 
with Waltham Chapter. 

On January 12, i860, Mr. Stone was united 
in marriage with Frances Maria Hobbs, daugh- 
ter of Nathan Hobbs, of Watertown. His 
children are Kittie Louise and Lillie Frances. 
Kittie Louise is now the wife of J. Frank 
Green, of this town, and has two children — 
Helen E. and Waldo S. Lillie Frances is 
the wife of John C. Brimblecome, of Newton, 
and has two daughters, Janet and Helen. Mr. 
Stone is a representative of an old and highly 
reputable Watertown family. He attends the 
Unitarian church, and has been chairman of 
the Parish Committee for the past ten years. 



lUFUS HOWE, Hudson's present 
Representative in the Massachusetts 
legislature and a veteran of the 
Civil War, was born in Bolton, 
Mass., September 28, 1837, son of Moses and 
Eunice (Dadmun) Howe. His first ancestor 
in this country was Abraham Howe, who prob- 
ably moved from Roxbury to Marlboro, Mass., 
May 6, 1657, and whose name appears among 
the proprietors of the last-named town in 1660. 
Abraham died June 30, 1695. Flis wife, 
Hannah, who was a daughter of William 
Ward, died November 3, 171 7, aged seventy- 
eight years. Joseph Howe, son of Abraham, 
born in Marlboro in 1661, became a large 
land-owner in Marlboro, Lancaster, and Water- 
town, and was also the owner of a grist-mill 
(probably the first one erected here) in Felton- 
ville, now called Hudson. His real estate was 
inventoried at one thousand four hundred and 
forty-two pounds. He died September 4, 
1700. The maiden name of his wife was Dor- 
othy Martin. His son, also named Joseph, 
who was the great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Marlboro, February 

1 9, 1697, and became one of the early proprie- 
tors of the town of New Marlboro. This Jo- 
seph died February 18, 1775. On February 

20, 1722, he first married his cousin, Zeruiah, 
who was a daughter of Captain Daniel Howe, 



and died December 10, 1723. On July 12, 
1728, he was again married to Ruth, daughter 
of Jonathan Brigham. She died October 12, 
1781, in her eighty-seventh year. 

Artemas Howe, son of Joseph and Ruth 
Howe, and grandfather of Rufus, was born on 
January 15, 1743. On May 28, 1767, be 
wedded Mary, daughter of Gershom Bigelow, 
and had a family of twelve children, of whom 
Moses was the youngest. Artemas Howe died 
November 17, 1813, and his wife on August 
15, 1 8 10, aged sixty-five years. Moses Howe, 
born in Marlboro, April 19, 1792, was a life- 
long resident of that town. His active years 
were devoted to agriculture, which he fol- 
lowed energetically and successfully, and he 
died in Bolton, Mass. His wife, Eunice, a 
native of Marlboro, whom he married Decem- 
ber 18, 1817, became the mother of nine chil- 
dren. Of these, Martha married Horatio B. 
Howe (not a relative) ; Henry served with the 
Fifty-third Regiment, Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, in the Civil War, and died of a fever in 
1863; Samuel is a resident of Marlboro; Caro- 
line married Thomas T. Sawyer, of Easthamp- 
ton, Mass.; Francis is deceased; Mary mar- 
ried Luke S. Stowe, of Springfield, Mass., and 
is still living; Charles resides in Bolton; and 
Loriman is also living. Mrs. Moses Howe 
was a member of the Baptist church. 

After leaving the public schools, Rufus 
Howe assisted his father upon the farm for 
some time. On August 6, 1862, he enlisted 
as a private in Company I, Thirty-sixth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, for 
three years' service in the Civil War. He 
participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, 
Jackson, the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and 
Spottsylvania, and in the sieges of Vicksburg, 
Knoxville, and Petersburg. Mustered out as 
Second Lieutenant in June, 1865, he returned 
home and went into a shoe factory, where he 
learned the trade of a cutter. He has since 
followed that business, and for a number of 
years has contracted to do the cutting for shoe 
manufacturers in Hudson, employing several 
men. 

In politics Mr. Howe is a Republican. As 
Representative to the legislature in 1897, he 
was a member of the Committee on Towns, and 
rendered valuable service to the Common- 




EUGENE G. HOITT. 




MURRAY D. CLEMENT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wealth. He was again elected Representative 
in 1898, and is now serving on the Committee 
on Towns, Parish and Religious Societies. 
He is a member of Doric Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
a charter member of Oak Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias; and for three years he was Com- 
mander of Reno Post, No. 9, G. A. R. 

He married Lucy Hudson, daughter of John 
W. Hudson, of Pittsford, Vt. , and now has 
two sons, Frank L. and Oscar R. The family 
attend the Unitarian church. 



ON. MURRAY DOLE CLEMENT, 
paymaster of the American Waltham 
Watch Company of Waltham, 
Mass., was born in Barnet, Vt. , 
May II, 1855, and is the son of Thomas B. 
and Eleanor (Dole) Clement. He traces his 
ancestry back to Valentine Clement, a native 
resident of Danville, Vt., who carried on gen- 
eral farming during the greater part of his 
life, and who died at the age of seventy-five 
years. Thomas B. Clement was also born at 
Danville, where he is still engaged in farm- 
ing. He married Eleanor Dole, daughter of 
General Stephen Dole, an officer in the Ver- 
mont militia. One child was born of this 
union, the son above named. Mrs. Clement 
died in 1893, at the age of sixty-three years. 
Murray Dole Clement acquired the rudi- 
ments of his education at a very youthful age 
in the public schools of his native town, 
whence in 1861 he removed to Ryegate, Vt., 
going thence in 1867 to Richfield, Mich., 
returning to Danville in 1869. For a while 
he attended the academy at West Charleston, 
Vt. ; and in 1870 he came to Massachusetts, 
and took a course at the Lowell Commercial 
College, making his home in that city. The 
year following he entered the employ of the 
Lowell Gas Light Company as a clerk in its 
counting-room, and continued thus engaged 
nearly twelve years. Removing to the city of 
Waltham in August, 1883, he became assist- 
ant paymaster of the American Waltham 
Watch Company ; and four years later he was 
promoted to his present position of paymaster. 
In Waltham he has taken the active interest 
which a good citizen ever takes in the affairs 
of his municipality, and here he has been hon- 



ored time and again by election to important 
offices. He was made a member of the Board 
of Aldermen for 1887, after a residence of but 
four years in the city. He was returned for 
1 888, for 1889, 1894, and 1896; and this 
year, 1897, marks the sixth of his service in 
that branch of the government. He was com- 
missioned Captain of Company F of the Fifth 
Regiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia on his thirty-sixth birthday, the nth 
of May, 1 891. He was commissioned Major 
on March 2, 1898, and is still in the service. 
He was raised in William North Lodge of 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in Jan- 
uary, 1882, subsequently affiliating with Isaac 
Parker Lodge of Waltham, becoming a mem- 
ber of Waltham Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons, Gethsemane Commandery of Knights 
Templars, and Aleppo Temple of the. Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. In 1879 he joined 
Oberlin Lodge, L O. O. F.. of Lowell; and 
in 1894 his membership was transferred to 
Governor Gore Lodge of Waltham. He is 
also a member of the Royal Arcanum and of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

Mr. Clement and Jennie Emerson, of Low- 
ell, were married on October 6, 1881. They 
have two daughters, one aged fourteen and the 
other nine years. 



UGENE GORHAM HOITT, M.D., 

the present Mayor of Marlboro, was 
born in Manchester, N. H., April 
12, 1S50, son of Samuel Locke and Ann J. 
(Hadley) Hoitt. The grandfather, Gorham 
W. Hoitt, a native of Barrington, N. H., 
passed the most of his life in Lee, and was 
one of the leading residents of that town in 
his day. As the Sheriff of Strafford County, 
he executed the sentence of death passed upon 
a noted criminal named Howard; and he 
served as Selectman, Moderator, and Justice 
of the Peace. 

Samuel Locke Hoitt, Mayor Hoitt's father, 
was born in Lee, August 22, 1828. He 
served an apprenticeship of seven years in the 
Amoskeag Machine Shops of Manchester, 
where he became familiar with the construc- 
tion of locomotives; and for some time he was 
a locomotive engineer on the Vermont Central 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Railroad. In 1857 he entered the service of 
the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad 
Company, with which he remained until 1895, 
when he retired. His death occurred August 
24, 1897. He was a Royal Arch Mason and 
a member of United Brethren Lodge, of Marl- 
boro. His wife, who was a daughter of Philip 
Hadley, of Dunbarton, N. H., bore him one 
child, Eugene G., the subject of this sketch. 

Having accompanied his parents to Port 
Jervis, N.Y. , when he was seven years old, 
Eugene Gorham Hoitt graduated from the 
academy in that town. Securing a position as 
clerk in a jewelry store, he saved his earnings 
for the purpose of defraying his college ex- 
penses; and what leisure time he had was de- 
voted to the preliminary study of medicine 
under the guidance of Drs. William L. Cudde- 
back and Solomon Van Etten, of Port Jervis. 
He attended the Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, for a year; and, after graduating 
from Buffalo University in 1S81, he located 
for practice in Marlboro. He has acquired a 
large practice as a physician and surgeon, 
making a specialty of surgery; and he stands 
high among the leading practitioners in this 
section. Dr. Hoitt has been the president 
and a visiting surgeon of the Marlboro Hos- 
pital. He is a member of the State Board of 
Medical Examiners; a member and councillor 
of the State Medical Society; a member of 
both the Massachusetts Medico-Legal and 
GyncEcological Societies of Boston, and the 
P'ramingham Medical Society; the president 
of the Marlboro Medical Club and an ex- 
president of the Union Club. He acts as ex- 
aminer for about twenty-five life insurance 
companies, and is examining surgeon for the 
United States Mutual Accident and the Trav- 
eller's Insurance Companies. 

Mayor Hoitt is a Past Master of Mount 
William Lodge, No. 762, F. & A. M., of 
Port Jervis; and he has membership in the 
United Brethren Lodge, Houghton Chapter, 
Trinity Commandery, of the Hudson Knights 
Templar, Aleppo Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
of Boston, and in the New York Consistory. 
He is also connected with Marlboro Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. He has been a member of the 
Board of Health for several years. In politics 
he is a Democrat, and in 1896 he was his 



party's candidate for the Mayoralty. Nomi- 
nated again for that ofifice in 1897, he was 
elected by a majority of three hundred votes. 
He married Sarah Frances Barrett, daughter of 
S. T. Barrett, D.D.S., of Port Jervis. His 
only daughter, Blanche E. Hoitt, died May 
II, 1894, aged nineteen years. Mrs. Plortt is 
a member of the Congregational church. 



ENJAMIN FRANKLIN BLAIS- 
DELL, of Carlisle, lumber manu- 
facturer, was born in this town, Janu- 
ary 10, 1845, son of Isaac A. and 
Susan (Green) Blaisdell. His grandfather, 
Isaac A. Blaisdell, Sr. , was also born in Car- 
lisle. This gentleman's brother William A., 
who was a prominent railroad man, moved 
away from Carlisle; also his brother Hiram 
W. , who went to Lowell, Mass. Grandfather 
Blaisdell settled on the farm now occupied by 
his grandson, the subject of this sketch. He 
married Polly Andrews, and became the father 
of three sons — Hiram W., William A., and 
Isaac A. 

Left fatherless when he was four years old, 
Isaac A. Blaisdell, Jr., together with his two 
brothers, William A. and Hiram, entered the 
family of Isaiah Green. When he was about 
eighteen years of age he went to live with 
Deacon Elijah Wood in Concord, and learned 
the shoemaker's trade. He afterward followed 
shoemaking for forty years, giving his atten- 
tion to it exclusively for thirty years. In the 
last ten years he devoted part of his time to 
the cultivation of a farm near " the Centre." 
For some time he was a Selectman of Carlisle. 
He died in July, 1891. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Tilly Green, and was born in Car- 
lisle, died in 1876. They had two sons — • 
Benjamin Franklin and Arthur C. The latter 
also is living in Carlisle. 

Benjamin Franklin Blaisdell began to earn 
a livelihood when quite young, working at 
first with his father. For the last eighteen 
years he has been engaged in his present busi- 
ness. His plant, an historic one, was estab- 
lished over a century ago. The old mill has 
since been replaced by a new one. Mr. Blais- 
dell controls an extensive business, manufact- 
uring hoops and lumber in different shapes, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and employing a number of men. In 1893 he 
purchased the farm which his grandfather had 
tilled, a fine estate of two hundred acres; 
and there he makes his home. Although he 
keeps out of politics, he has served as Over- 
seer of the Poor for a number of years. 

Mr. Blaisdell was married at the age of 
twenty-one to Miss Ella Isadore Morse, of 
Carlisle, who died four years after marriage. 
She left one child, Benjamin Franklin, who 
owns his grandfather's farm at "the Centre," 
and is engaged in farming. He married Miss 
Sibyl Gertrude Wilson. In 1875 Mr. Blais- 
dell, Sr., contracted a second marriage with 
Miss Sarah L. Hutchins, of Carlisle. She 
was born in New York City and reared in 
Carlisle. Her children were: Edgar I., 
Willie G. , Florence E., and Susan G. 
Edgar, who is living with his father, was mar- 
ried January i, 1897, to Alice W. Martin, a 
native of Stoneham. Florence E. was mar- 
ried October 6, 1896, to Henry G. Locke, an 
engineer, now of Arlington, Mass. The other 
two died in infancy. Both parents attend the 
Universalist church. 



W\ 



ALTER MORSE, an esteemed resi- 
dent of Natick, was born in Sher- 
born, Middlesex County, April 16, 
1 8 18. A son of Ezra Morse, he comes of sub- 
stantial New England stock. His grand- 
father, Obadiah Morse, who died at the age of 
forty-eight years, was a brother of Samuel 
F. B. Morse, who achieved world-wide fame 
as the inventor of the electric recording tele- 
graph, the model of which was put in operation 
in New York in 1835, and brought forth the 
following stanza: — 

'"That steed called Lightning,' say the Fates, 
' Is owned in the United States. 
'Twas Franklin's hand that caught the horse ; 
'Twas harnessed by Professor Morse.'" 

Walter Morse, with his four brothers and 
one sister, was reared on the homestead farm 
in Sherborn. From that place he came in 
1844 to Natick, then a hamlet of fourteen 
houses, now a thriving village alive with in- 
dustries. He began work as a leather cutter 
in a shoe shop. In a short time, having 



formed a partnership with William T. Han- 
chett, he established a shoe factory. About 
one year later he moved to the site now occu- 
pied by Clark's Block, and there carried on an 
extensive business for several years as junior 
member of the firm of Hanchett & Morse, 
sending out work through Natick, Sherborn, 
Needham, and adjacent towns. In 1865 Mr. 
Morse sold out his interests in Natick. Then, 
after spending two years on a farm in Sher- 
born, he disposed of his interest in that prop- 
erty and moved to South Framingham. Two 
years later he went to Sublette, Lee County, 
111., purchased a tract of fertile land, and 
there carried on general farming and stock- 
raising after the most approved modern meth- 
ods. Here, also, he built a substantial resi- 
dence after the style of Eastern houses, which 
greatly contrasted with the Western farm- 
houses of that time, and which he made his 
home fifteen years. In 1880 he returned with 
his wife to Natick to spend his declining days 
with his early friends. Much attached to the 
town in which he has spent the best part of his 
long life, he has deeded to it ten acres of the 
land included in the beautiful common located 
in the centre of the village, to be retained by 
the town as long as it is used as a common, 
but to revert to him or his heirs if diverted to 
any other purpose. 

On October 7, 1847, Mr. Morse married 
Miss Susan M. Brown, of Framingham, a sis- 
ter of Captain William H. Brown, of Natick. 
They have two children, namely: Herbert A., 
a real estate dealer of Chicago, 111., who has 
one son, Walter H. ; and Mary Isabell, who 
married Charles H. Ingalls, a Colonel of an 
Illinois regiment and a prominent farmer of 
Sublette. Mrs. Ingalls has five children — 
Herbert F., Grace M., Walter, Neva, and 
Fred. 



ANSOM A. GUERNSEY, who con- 
ducts the oldest established wood and 
coal business in Hudson, was born 
in Pittsfield, Vt., August 21, 1841, 
son of Reuben and Achsa (Smith) Guernsey. 
His grandfather, Amos Guernsey, was a resi- 
dent of Rockingham, Vt. The father was 
born and reared in Rockingham, where he 



336 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



resided until he was twenty-eight years old. 
He then settled upon a farm in Pittsfield, and 
remained there until his death, which occurred 
in 1879, at the age of eighty-four years. He 
was a Democrat in politics, and he served as a 
Selectman for a number of years. He was 
also Highway Surveyor, a member of the 
School Board, and served in other town offices. 
His religious belief was the Universalist 
creed. He was the father of thirteen chil- 
dren, nine of whom grew to maturity, and five 
are living. The latter are: Lucy Jane, who 
married Jonathan H. Ranney, of Pittsfield ; 
Lucinda, the widow of Norman Durkee, resid- 
ing in Bethel, Vt. ; Amos F., a resident of 
Pittsfield; Lorrilla J., the wife of Elijah 
Baker, of Stockbridge, Vt. ; and Ransom A. 
Guernsey, the subject of this sketch. The 
others were : Lorinda, who was the wife of 
Ransom Farnsworth, of Saxton's River, Vt. ; 
George S. and Moses R. ; and Lora Ann, who 
married Charles S. Mason, of Ludlow, Vt. 

Ransom A. Guernsey acquired a limited ed- 
ucation by attending school for a short time 
after he was thirteen years old. He was em- 
ployed in farming until he was twenty-one. 
Then, after working in a store in Rochester, 
Vt., for a year, he was employed as brakeman 
on the Rutland & Burlington Railroad for 
three years. While there he sustained a se- 
vere injury in an accident, which laid him up 
for nine weeks. He next became associated 
with his brother, Amos F., in the wheel- 
wright and blacksmith business in Pittsfield, 
where he remained about five years. Going to 
Boston in 1S74, he was for a few months asso- 
ciated with a partner in the grocery and pro- 
vision business. For ten years he was en- 
gaged in the milk business; and, selling out, 
he came in 1887 to Hudson and purchased the 
oldest established wood and coal business in 
this town. Since taking possession of the 
premises, he has replaced the old sheds with 
modern buildings, and constructed an inclined 
road for cars. He handles about six thousand 
tons of coal and five hundred cords of wood 
annually. 

Mr. Guernsey is a member of Doric Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; of Houghton Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; of Trinity Commandery, 
Knights Templar, of which he was Prelate for 



four years; and of Aleppo Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, Boston. Also he is a Past 
Chancellor of Oak Lodge, Knights of Pythias; 
and he is connected with the Pilgrim Fathers; 
with Howard Lodge, No. 22, L O. O. F. ; 
and with Mystic Lodge, No. 8, Daughters of 
Rebecca, of Charlestown, Mass. He married 
Addie V. Brown, daughter of John Brown, of 
Stockbridge, Vt. His only daughter, Lora 
Ann, is now the wife of Herbert T. Bond, of 
Hudson. Mr. Guernsey has achieved success 
through his own efforts, and is regarded as 
one of the leading business men of Hudson. 
Both he and Mrs. Guernsey attend the Unita- 
rian church. 



§OSEPH VARNUM JACKMAN, the 
principal of the Bigelow School in 
Marlboro, was born in Nevvburyport, 
Mass., January 6, 1837, son of Will- 
iam T. and Sarah C. (Varnum) Jackman. 
His grandfather, David Jackman, who was a 
farmer of NewburyjDort, was killed by a prema- 
ture blast of powder. The father, also a na- 
tive of Newburyport, after receiving his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that town, learned 
the ship-carpenter's trade, and followed it for 
a number of years. He was superintendent of 
timber in a large ship-yard for fifteen or twenty 
years. His wife, who was a daughter of Sam- 
uel and Sarah (Jackman) Varnum, had four 
children, namely: Joseph Varnum, the subject 
of this sketch; William H., who died at 
Baton Rouge during the late war; and Martha 
Ellen and Winfield S., both residing in New- 
buryport. 

Joseph Varnum Jackman attended the public 
schools of his native town, and subsequently 
fitted himself for the Polytechnic Institute at 
Troy, N.Y. A natural inclination to the call- 
ing drew him into teaching before he had fully 
decided on his life work. His subsequent 
success in the profession helps to demonstrate 
that teachers, like poets, "are born, not 
made." While out riding with a friend one 
day, the horse, casting a shoe, obliged them to 
seek aid in a blacksmith shop. The black- 
smith, who was a member of the Newton 
(N. H.) School Committee, in the course of 
conversation jnentioned that Newton needed an 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



instructor that was also a good disciplinarian. 
It was suggested that Mr. Jackman take the 
school, and he consented to do so. After tak- 
ing charge, he taught , for twelve weeks. 
Then he taught for another twelve weeks in 
the Highland District of Amesbury, and in 
West Newbury for sixteen weeks, making a 
period of forty consecutive weeks without a va- 
cation. He was subsequently employed as 
teacher in the Mills District of Amesbury for 
two years, in the Point District of Salisbury 
for three years, and he was principal of the 
West Male Grammar School in Newburyport 
for five years. In 1868 he was appointed prin- 
cipal of the Pleasant Street School in Marl- 
boro, and in 1883 he was transferred to the 
Bigelow School, which was organized that 
year. He is an able and popular teacher. A 
resident of Marlboro now for nearly thirty 
years, he has had as many as five graduates of 
his own school teaching under him. His fa- 
vorite subjects are mathematics and natural 
science. 

Mr. Jackman married Sarah M., daughter of 
Samuel B. Maynard, of Marlboro. He has 
two daughters: Marion M., now in the class of 
1898 at Wellesley College; and Alice M., 
who is employed in the office of the <jy> Shoe 
Factory of Marlboro, conducted by S. H. Howe. 
In politics he is independent. He has been 
an officer in the United Order of the Golden 
Cross since its organization, being for some 
time Senior P. N. C, and at present Keeper 
of Records. He is a member of the Unitarian 
church, and was its librarian for ten years. 



|RS. CHARLES H. PECK, proprie- 
tor of Peck Farm, a pleasant sum- 
mer resort in Pepperell, was born 
in North Pepperell, September 
22, 1833, daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
(Blood) Miller. Her paternal grandfather 
was William Miller, of Peterboro, N. H. 
The father was a carpenter by trade, and fol- 
lowed it as his chief occupation through life. 
He came to Pepperell when a young man, first 
settling upon the farm now owned by S. P. 
Bancroft. Later he moved to another farm 
in the same locality. He died in 1872, aged 



seventy-two years, leaving the record of an in- 
dustrious farmer and a useful citizen. His 
wife, Sarah, was a daughter of Colonel Francis 
Blood, and on her mother's side a grand-daugh- 
ter of Captain John Nutting, who served under 
Colonel Prescott in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
She died in 1888, aged eighty-three years, 
leaving three daughters, namely: Sarah Eliza, 
born October 27, 1827, who is now the widow 
of Charles Dow, and lives at the old home- 
stead; Mary Frances, the subject of this 
sketch; and Martha Louise, born February 12, 
1840, who is now the widow of David W. R. 
Hinckley, and resides in Hollis, N. H. 

Mary Frances Miller acquired a good educa- 
tion, and for some time taught school in Pep- 
perell. In 1854 she accompanied Major J. G. 
Heald to the Choctaw Reservation in the Ind- 
ian Territory, going partly as a companion 
for Mrs. Heald, who was the only white 
woman at the agency, and also for the purpose 
of teaching. While there she met her first 
husband, William Wilson, to whom she was 
married on October 31, 1856, at Fort Smith, 
Ark. Born in North Carolina in 1807, he 
was graduated from Jefferson College, Canons- 
burg, Pa., in 1831, and from the medical de- 
partment in 1835, receiving three diplomas. 
Some years previous to 1854 he went to the 
Choctaw Agency, where he taught an Indian 
school. In i860 Mr. and Mrs. Wilson came 
East, and, deciding to make Pepperell their 
future home, purchased a farm. During the 
war Mr. Wilson visited his native State, 
where he remained for some time, managing a 
plantation belonging to relatives. Returning 
North in 1865, he died August 3 of that year. 
He left two daughters : Mary Heald, born 
September 7, i860; and Bessie Harwood, born 
April 27, 1866, who died August 3, 1877. 
Possessed of many rare educational attain- 
ments, he was highly respected by all who 
knew him. 

In 1867 Mrs. Wilson conceived the idea of 
taking summer boarders. Having put this 
project, into practical operation, she has since 
fully demonstrated her ability to make it a 
success. Her property is situated on Mount 
Lebanon Street, at a short distance from Pep- 
perell Centre, where its elevated position 
makes it especially desirable as 9 symroer 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



home. Many of her boarders return each 
year, and some have spent their summers with 
her for the past twenty years. Ably assisted 
by her daughter, she entertains all in a most 
painstaking manner. On November 21, 1878, 
she married Charles H. Peck, a native of 
Taunton, Mass., who devotes his time chiefly 
to the management of the farm. During the 
summer of 1898 Mr. and Mrs. Peck took their 
first vacation in thirty-one years. 



§OHN S. FAY, Postmaster of Marlboro, 
was born in Berlin, Mass., on January 
' 15, 1840, his parents being Samuel 
Chandler and Nancy (Warren) Fay. 
He is of the seventh generation from John 
Fay, born in England in 1648, who embarked 
May 30, 1656, on the ship "Speedwell," 
Robert Lock, master, and arrived in Boston 
on June 27, 1656. 

John Fay was bound for Sudbury, but in 
1669 he is known to have been in Marlboro, 
and the births of his eight children are re- 
corded as taking place in Marlboro. The 
name of his first wife is not known. His sec- 
ond wife was Mrs. Susannah Morse, widow of 
Joseph Morse and a daughter of William 
ShattLick, of Watertown, born in 1643. After 
the death of John Fay she married Thomas 
Brigham. John Fay was driven from Marl- 
boro in 167s during King Philip's War, and 
went to Watertown, where he buried his first 
wife and one son. After the war he returned 
to Marlboro, and died here on December 5, 
1690. The line of descent from him is 
through Gershom, who was born October 19, 
1681, and died in 1720; Gershom, Jr., born 
1703, died 1784; Adam, born 1736, died 
1 8 10; Baxter, born 1775, died 1854; and 
Samuel Chandler Fay, above named. 

Mr. Fay's mother was a grand-daughter of 
Benjamin Warren, who was probably born in 
Westboro, Mass., although his wife was a na- 
tive of Marlboro. After marriage they resided 
in Westboro. They had fifteen children, 
among them four that were twin-born. Jo- 
seph, one of the four, born in Westboro about 
1785, twin brother of Benjamin, Jr., married 
Arethusa Seaver, daughter of Edwin Seaver, 
of Worcester. He was a lifelong farmer. 



His children were: Nancy, born in 18 17, who 
married Samuel C. P"ay, and was the mother of 
Mr. John S. Fay; Joseph, Jr.; and William 
Warren . 

John S. Fay has resided in Marlboro con- 
tinuously since 1848. He was educated in 
the public schools of Marlboro and at a com- 
mercial college in Worcester. On July 16, 
1861, he enlisted in Company F of the Thir- 
teenth Massachusetts Regiment of Volunteers, 
and he was in service with his company until 
April 30, 1863. At that time, being in ac- 
tion near Fredericksburg, Va. , he received 
wounds from a shell fired from the Confeder- 
ate ranks that cost him his right arm and leg. 
He was at this time holding the rank of Ser- 
geant. Six weeks later, on June 15, 1863, 
while in the field hospital, he was captured by 
the Confederates, and until July 17 was con- 
fined in Libby Prison at Richmond. He was 
then paroled and sent to the hospital at An- 
napolis, and from there was discharged. He 
reached his home in October of that year, the 
most crippled and mutilated of all the sur- 
vivors of the eight hundred and thirty-one 
men that Marlboro sent into the service of the 
government during the great struggle for the 
preservation of the Union. 

Mr. Fay was appointed Postmaster of Marl- 
boro by President Andrew Johnson in May, 
1865, and by successive appointments he has 
held the office ever since, receiving his ninth 
commission in January, 1895. He has been 
retained during this long period, not only be- 
cause he is a veteran of the war and has made 
a sacrifice which entitles him to the admiration 
of every man in Marlboro, but also because 
the efificiency of his service as Postmaster 
has been strongly marked, and because the 
people of the city are satisfied that the affairs 
of the ofifice could not be more successfully 
administered. The office when Mr. Fay took 
charge of it had just emerged from the fourth 
class, and required but one clerk. It is now 
a second-class office, and requires the services 
of eight carriers and four clerks. Mr. Fay 
was Tax Collector for the town of Marlboro 
in 1867 and 1868. He is a member of John 
A- Rawlins Post, No. 43, G. A. R., of which 
he was one of the organizers in 1868; and he 
has held many official positions in that body. 




JOHN S. FAY 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He was a member of the committee appointed 
by the town to erect the soldiers' monument. 
In 1874 Mr. Fay was elected Junior Vice- 
Commander of the Department of Massachu- 
setts of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

On November 20, 1869, Mr. Fay was united 
in marriage with Lizzie, daughter of James 
Monroe and Elizabeth (Pratt) Ingalls. Mrs. 
Fay is a descendant of Edmund Ingalls, who 
settled in Lynn in 1629, the line being con- 
tinued from Edmund through Henry, Henry, 
Jr., Josiah, Josiah (second), Josiah (third), 
and James to her father, James Monroe, above 
named. James Monroe Ingalls was born on 
May 8, 1819, in Jaffrey, N.H. His father 
died when he was eleven years old, and after 
living three years with a farmer in Rindge he 
went to live with his uncle Josiah in Fitzwill- 
iam, N.H. From 1865 until his decease in 
December, 1S94, he was a carriage-maker in 
Marlboro. He was a veteran of the late war, 
having enlisted in Company F of the Six- 
teenth New Hampshire Regiment, and served 
in the Army of the Gulf and at the siege of 
Port Hudson. He was a member of John A. 
Rawlins Post, No. 43, G. A. R. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Reuben Pratt, of Fitz- 
william, N.H. ; and they were the parents of 
two children, Mrs. Fay being the only one 
living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fay have one son, Frederic 
Harold Fay, who was born on July 5, 1872. 
He was graduated at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology in the class of 1893, and 
in the following year, after a year of post- 
graduate work, he took his degree of Master 
of Science. Since then he has been in the 
office of the city engineer of Boston as de- 
signer of bridges and general structural work. 
He is a member of Marlboro Lodge, No. 85, 
I. O. O. F. ; of the Boston Society of Civil 
Engineers; of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers; and of the Technology Club of 
Boston. He is secretary of his class and one 
of the officers of the Association of Class Sec- 
retaries of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. On April 21, 1897, he married 
Clara, daughter of J. Fred Potter, of Ouincy, 
111. They have one child, Allen Potter Fay. 
The family reside in Boston. 

Mr. John S. Fay is a member of Marlboro 



Lodge, No. 85, I. O. O. F., in which he has 
passed through all the chairs; and he also be- 
longs to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. 
For some years he has been a Notary Public. 
He has been closely identified with the Marl- 
boro Co-operative Bank from its organization, 
of which he is vice-president, and is chairman 
of the Security Committee of its Board of 
Directors. He has been for many years an 
active member of the Unitarian church in 
Marlboro. 



T^LARENCE STICKNEY, of West 
I Ky Townsend, who manufactures and 
^y^^^ deals in cooperage stock and a large 
variety of special articles, was born 
in Townsend, Mass., July 12, 1849, son of 
Alvah and Rebecca Wright (Spalding) Stick- 
ney. The father, son of Joseph Stickney, was 
also born in Townsend. He owned a farm in 
the northern part of the town, where he had a 
mill and was engaged in coopering and lumber- 
ing, besides doing his farm work. His wife, 
Rebecca, had twelve children — seven sons and 
five daughters — of whom Clarence was the 
eighth in the order of birth. All are living 
but two, and four reside in Townsend. Two 
of the sons are physicians, namely: Dr. 
Alonzo L. Stickney, of Ashburnham, Mass. ; 
and Dr. Clifford W. Stickney, of Holden, 
Mass. The father lived to be eighty years 
old. 

Clarence Stickney' s boyhood was passed on 
his father's farm, where and at Townsend 
Centre he remained during his minority. He 
learned the cooper''s trade, at which he subse- 
quently worked for about ten years, principally 
in the employment of A. L. Fessenden. He 
then set up in this line of business for him- 
self, and he conducted it for two years before 
he bought his present plant in 1882. When 
making this new departure he was obliged to 
assume a heavy debt. Since then, from a 
small beginning, with but one helper, he has 
worked up a large and prosperous business, 
which gives employment to between twenty 
and thirty men, and has entirely refitted the 
plant, adding machinery and other necessary 
appliances to increase the output. His manu- 
factures include such articles as ice chests, egg 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cases, kegs, casks, laths, shingles, clapboards, 
and cooperage stock. He has planing ma- 
chines, and cuts the larger part of his own 
lumber. 

At the age of twenty-three Mr. Stickney 
married Miss Carrie F. Sawtelle, daughter of 
I. B. Sawtelle. They have had three chil- 
dren : Charles Bills Stickney, who resides 
with his father; Wilfred Roy, who died when 
four years of age; and Agnes Wilhelmine, 
now attending the high school. A stanch Re- 
publican, Mr. Stickney has served on the 
Republican Town Committee for years, and has 
many times been a delegate to conventions. 
In 1892 he was a Representative to the Massa- 
chusetts legislature, and was appointed a mem- 
ber of the Liquor Law Committee, upon 
which he did good service. He was a member 
of the Board of Selectmen, and he served as 
Assessor and Overseer of the Poor. For a 
number of years he has been a member of the 
fire company. In communion with the Con- 
gregational church at Townsend Centre, he, 
as well as his wife, attends and sings in the 
choir of the Baptist church at the West 
village. 



§OHN O. BENNETT, a contractor and 
farmer of North Pepperell, was born 
here November 8, 1838, son of Jona- 
than and Mary (Taylor) Bennett. His 
grandfather, Jonathan Bennett (first), was a 
native of Groton, Mass., and a mason by 
trade. The father, who was born in Dun- 
stable, came to Pepperell about the year 1836. 
He learned the mason's trade, which he fol- 
lowed in Nashua for a time, and also assisted 
in the construction of the dam and the first 
mills in that town. He later purchased the 
grist-mill, and engaged in cabinet-making and 
the manufacture of sashes, blinds, etc. After- 
ward he followed lumbering, having leased the 
mill to another party. He sold out when the 
Civil War began. Some time later he bought 
the farm where his son, John O., now resides, 
and lived there until his death, which occurred 
at the age of seventy-one. Originally a Whig, 
he joined the Republican party at its forma- 
tion. He was prominent in public affairs, 
and served as Selectman, Assessor, and Over- 



seer of the Poor. He was a member of St. 
Paul Lodge, F. & A. M., of Ayer. His wife, 
Mary, a daughter of Deacon Isaac Taylor, of 
Dunstable, having survived him many years, 
died in 1888, at the age of eighty years. 

John O. Bennett worked in his father's mill 
for a time. Then he learned the trade of a 
mason. After spending a year in the West, 
he returned and resumed his trade, working for 
a time with his uncle. Wilder Bennett, a 
prominent contractor of Lowell. Since he 
left the employment of his uncle he has been 
a contractor on his own account. He has al- 
ways lived upon the home farm. Politically, 
he is a Republican. He has taken an active 
part in public affairs, and has filled nearly all 
of the town offices. He was a member of the 
Board of Registrars when the new registry 
law went into force. 

On January i, 1874, Mr. Bennett was joined 
in marriage to Fannie E. Brown, a native of 
Ogle County, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett 
are the parents of three children ; namely, 
Harry J., Fred D., and Frank R. P'red and 
Frank are twins. Harry, who has travelled 
extensively in the West, is now at home. 
Frank is employed at the station of the Fitch- 
burg Railroad in Brookline. 

Mrs. Bennett is an accomplished musician, 
an excellent teacher of instrumental music, 
and plays the organ at the Unitarian church in 
Pepperell Centre. Mr. Bennett, who is also 
a good musician, has been connected with 
bands. Both are members of Prescott Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. 



ARS PETERSEN, a prominent agri- 
culturist of Concord, was born in 
Hedemarken, Norway, on October 
3, 185 1, and" was reared on a farm 
in that country. In 1873 he emigrated to the 
United States, and upon reaching this country 
came direct to Concord. Working at first as 
a farm laborer, he was for two years with 
George F. Wheeler and for six years with M. 
Houghton. At the end of these eight years 
he bought the farm upon which he now lives, 
going in debt to the amount of five thousand 
dollars. He has devoted his land chiefly to 
the growing of asparagus. However, five 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



acres are used for the culture of small fruits, 
an acre and a half for blackberries, and three 
acres for strawberries. He has a dairy of 
about twenty cows, and employs five men on 
his farm. His first year's farming brought 
him less than one thousand dollars; but in 
1896 his sales of produce amounted to over 
five times that amount. His land was largely 
pasture when he bought it, was very much run 
down, and had rock in abundance. Since then 
he has extended the estate, and made many 
improvements, including the enlargement and 
modernizing of the buildings. 

On February 13, 1875, Mr. Petersen was 
united in marriage with Olena Olsen, also a 
native of Norway, and who came to this coun- 
try at the time Mr. Petersen did. Six chil- 
dren have blessed this marriage, all of whom 
are at home. Their names are : Olga Louise, 
Anna Katherine, Ralph Barton, Ella Otelia, 
Lillie Paulina, and Helen Isabel. The fam- 
ily also includes an adopted son. Christian. 
Mr. and Mrs. Petersen are members of the 
Congregational church at Concord, and Mr. 
Petersen is now serving his fourth year as 
Deacon of the church. He is a Republican 
in politics, and takes an active part in town 
and county affairs. When he came to Concord 
there were only four Norwegian girls in the 
town. He and Martin Helscher were the first 
Norwegians to cast a vote in Concord. Mr. 
Petersen is a fine example of what may be ac- 
complished by a man who is industrious and 
bound to succeed, although he has no capital 
to start on except the energy and brains given 
him by mother nature. 



WILLIAM H. 
man of the 
Sfow_ wns 



PARKER, the chair- 
Board of Selectmen of 
Stow, was born in Acton, Mass., 
November 10, 1S63, son of James L. and 
Fannie E. (Godding) Parker. The father, 
who moved from Acton to Stow in 1864, since 
that time has been living at Boone Pond, in 
the southern part of the town. An active and 
highly respected citizen, he has served as Se- 
lectman and Overseer of the Poor and in other 
town offices. His son, James F. , who mar- 
ried Miss Royce, was Town Collector of Stow 
in 1897, and was re-elected to the same office 



in 1898. James is a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. 

William H. Parker remained with his par- 
ents until he attained his majority. Then he 
started in business with his brother James 
F., raising for the market asparagus, straw- 
berries, peas, sweet corn, early cabbages, 
etc. They have been very successful, and the 
firm of Parker Brothers is now one of the best 
known in this section of the county. Mr. 
Parker also has a large dairy business, keeping 
some fifteen cows. He has about sixty acres 
in the home farm and two hundred and fifty 
in wood lots. Conjointly with his brother, he 
controls a prosperous ice business, and he has 
made some very successful investments in 
wood lots, the timber of which they cut in 
winter. 

Mr. Parker was married June 12, 1896, to 
Miss Edith L. Swaney, of Hudson, Mass., a 
native of the State of Maine. He is an active 
Republican, has served as delegate to a num- 
ber of conventions, and is at present a mem- 
ber of the Republican Town Committee. 
Elected to the School Committee in 1S90, he 
served for three years. He has been on the 
Board of Selectmen for four years, presiding 
as its chairman for two years; and he has been 
the chairman of the Board of Assessors the 
same length of time. A man of decided 
views, he has the courage of his convictions. 
About three years ago he was active in a cru- 
sade against the liquor dealers, during which 
several were fined and obliged to close their 
saloons, three were sent to jail for illegal 
dealing, and one was sentenced to five years' 
imprisonment for perjury; while the majority 
of the others left the place, since which time 
the town has been very quiet and orderly. 



(sTr^TEMAS CONANT PUTNAM was 
fcIA for many years an active and highly 
yJIgV esteemed resident of Hopkinton. 
He was born November 13, 1805, 
in Stow, Mass., where his earliest years 
were spent. His father, Nathan Putnam, died 
in the prime of a vigorous manhood in 181 3. 
Scarcely fourteen years of age, Artemas left 
home to battle with the world. For a few 
years he worked in Dedham, Mass. Early in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the thirties he came to Hopkinton and formed 
a copartnership with M. Fairbanks. Putnam 
& Fairbanks was for some years one of the 
leading mercantile firms of this part of the 
county. Afterward Mr. Putnam established 
himself as a carriage manufacturer, in which 
he carried on a very extensive and successful 
business until compelled to retire by failing 
health. 

Mr. Putnam's integrity, sound judgment, 
and force of character brought him prominently 
before the people as a desirable pulolic official, 
and he often served his townsmen as Tax Col- 
lector and Treasurer, as well as in other capac- 
ities. In 1872 he was elected to represent 
his district at the General Court, where he 
rendered efficient service in the Committee on 
Finance and in the Standing Committee. 
Being well versed in law, he was frequently 
appointed administrator of estates, was in de- 
mand for the drawing of wills and other docu- 
ments, and was entrusted with the care of 
much property belonging to others. Of a nat- 
urally religious temperament and strong in 
his convictions; he united with the Congrega- 
tional church when a young man, and from 
that time was one of its most faithful 
members. 

On February 4, 1836, Mr. Putnam married 
Miss Mary P. Guy, of Hopkinton, who in her 
younger days was a successful teacher, and 
who was pleasantly remembered by many of 
the business men of this town as their early 
instructor. Mr. and Mrs. Putnam reared two 
children — Willard Johnson and Mary E. 
Willard, who was fitted for college at the 
Hopkinton High School, died November 3, 
1857, while in his Junior year at Amherst Col- 
lege. Mary E. Putnam, now a woman of re- 
fined culture and literary tastes, was educated 
at the Framingham Normal School and at 
Lasell Seminary in Auburndale. Afterward 
she taught in the Hopkinton schools for a 
short time. She has always been actively 
interested in educational and literary work. 
With several other prominent women of the 
town she was instrumental in establishing 
the Hopkinton Public Library, which she has 
since served as one of the Library Committee. 
Also, the first librarian of that institution, she 
creditably filled the position for several years. 



Mr. Putnam died on December 3, 1882, and 
Mrs. Putnam passed away in 18S6. 



IC' 



OSES E. GRIFFIN was well 
known and respected in North 
Pepperell. Born in Tewksbury, 
Mass., January 28, 1812, he was 
a son of Moses and Hannah (Foster) Griffin, 
both of whom were natives of Tewksbury. 
The father, who was a cabinet-maker, moved 
to Pepperell in 1840, and died at the home of 
a daugliter in this town at the age of eighty- 
seven. His other children were: John, un- 
married, who lives in the centre of the town; 
Rebecca, also residing at Pepperell Centre, 
widow of Darius Sibley; and Enoch and Han- 
nah, who died unmarried. 

Moses E. Griffin acquired his education in 
different towns, his parents having moved to 
Billerica when he was eight years old and to 
Littleton, Mass., when he was nine. When 
he attained his majority he left home and 
hired out as a farm hand in Charlestown. In 
1840 he purchased the farm in the northern 
part of Pepperell, on which he was living at 
the time of his death. This was an estate of 
about one hundred and twenty acres. Al- 
though to acquire it he was obliged to shoul- 
der a heavy debt, he not only paid off this lia- 
bility, but added more land to the property, so 
that it now contains about two hundred acres. 
He was a man of sterling character, honest 
and unostentatious, making no parade of his 
prosperity, but always willing to acknowledge 
it, even to a tax collector. His residence, in 
which he lived for fifty-seven years, was built 
over a century ago. 

Mr. Griffin was married February 22, 1859, 
to Caroline Melendy, of Amherst, N. PL, who 
died October 2, 1888. Mrs. Griffin had been 
an invalid for ten years prior to her death. 
She left three children — Carrie Lizzie, 
George E., and William Franklin, who are all 
residing at the homestead. Lizzie, who has 
charge of the household, is a bright and attrac- 
tive lady. Her unselfish devotion to her in- 
valid mother was the manifestation of a beau- 
tiful trait in her character. Mr. Griffin was a 
Republican, and served as Town Assessor. 
He was a charter member of Prescott Grange 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and one of the six original members living 
before his death. He attended and sup- 
ported the Congregational church at Pepperell 
Centre. On January 5, 1897, as he was re- 
turning from the North Pepperell station in 
his carriage, the horse became frightened and 
ran away, throwing out Mr. Griffin and caus- 
ing him injuries from which he died four 
hours later. The sad event was mourned by 
the entire community that knew and respected 
him so well. The two sons are now carrying 
on the farm work. 



§-OSEPH F. THOMPSON, who success- 
fully conducts a saw-mill and a cooper- 
age business at West Townsend, was 
born here, October 20, 1848, son of Jo- 
seph Thompson. The original mill was built 
about one hundred years ago by Jacob Saun- 
ders, who conducted it for fifty years' as a lum- 
ber and grist mill. Joseph Thompson then 
purchased it, and, after carrying on the busi- 
ness for fifteen years, sold out to his son, Jo- 
seph F., who, in the thirty-five years that 
have since passed, has built up a very prosper- 
ous business. The father, who came from 
Pennsylvania, was a millwright by trade, and 
one of the first to put a water-wheel in some of 
the large Lowell mills. He died about twelve 
years ago after a very active business life. 

Townsend, for generations, has been the 
centre of the most extensive coopering busi- 
ness done in New England. Formerly a 
cooper lived in almost every house, adjoining 
which he had his little shop. In later years 
the business has been concentrated in the 
hands of a few large manufacturers; but about 
as many men are given employment, while, 
with the improved machinery, the output is 
probably greater. Joseph F. Thompson em- 
ploys from fifteen to twenty men in the various 
departments of his establishment. His output 
includes large quantities of half and quarter 
barrel kits for use on fishing trips. His saw 
and planing mill, where he also does edging 
and matching, has a large custom trade. The 
fully equipped plant is admirably adapted to 
its purpose. George Stevens, one of the old- 
est and most skilled mechanics of this section, 
has a machine shop in one part of the place. 



where he does a good business in the finer 
kinds of repair work. He also turns out ' a 
high-grade saw-mill besides other machinery. 
Mr. Thompson attends closely to the details of 
his business. Should one visit his mill when 
an important order is being filled, he might be 
found, not only supervising the work, but 
pushing it forward with his own hands. A 
quiet, clear-headed, and hard-working man, he 
makes little display while moving right along, 
contributing an important part to the welfare 
of the Squannacook Valley. 

Mr. Thompson is a Democratic voter, and 
one of the Board of Registers, on which he 
has now served for thirteen years. He is a 
member of the North Star Lodge, Lidependent 
Order of Odd Fellows, which he has served in 
the various offices. In 1876 he married Miss 
Eva Brown, of Halifax, N. S. Of their four 
children, Blanche, the first-born, died in in- 
fancy; and Frank, the only son, died at the 
age of twelve. The others are : Gertrude, aged 
twelve; and Lena Maude, five years old. 



BIJAH PARKS VVOLCOTT, of Stow, 
the owner of one of the most beauti- 
ful farm homesteads in this county, 
was born on this farm, November 23, 
1832. A son of Jonathan and Sarah B. 
(Parks) Wolcott, he is of the fourth genera- 
tion of Wolcotts on the estate. His great- 
grandfather, the first representative of the fam- 
ily on the place, was a Revolutionary soldier. 
The grandfather, Jonathan Wolcott, Sr., born 
in 1767, died in 1823. In his day a highway 
was planned connecting Stow with Bolton, 
and, to accommodate stage travellers, he partly 
built a hotel in the substantial style of the 
last century, with strong, heavy timbers. 
Neither the highway nor the hotel was ever 
completed. The latter has since been moved 
near to the residence, and is now used for a 
carriage house. Grandfather Wolcott' s wife, 
Hannah, who was born in 1767, died in 1834. 
They had a family of eight children; namely, 
Hannah, Jonathan, Jabez, Artemas, Elizabeth, 
Hiram, William, and George. 

Jonathan Wolcott, Jr., born on the home- 
stead, June 15, 1790, spent his life here, and 
died December 23, 1S62. On December 30, 



346 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1 8 19, he was married to Sarah B., daughter of 
Abijah and Polly Parks. She died December 
8^ 1S44. Their children were: Artemas, 
Charles Tolman, Lorenzo, Samuel, Abijah, 
Martha Maria, Sarah Elizabeth, Ann Maria, 
and Jonathan. Artemas lived on part of the 
old farm in Stow, worked for Amory Maynard, 
and dumped the first load of gravel for the 
dam when the mills were building. He died 
July 23, 1892, aged seventy-two, leaving his 
widow and one daughter, who are living in 
Marlboro. Charles Tolman, who was a farmer 
of Stow, died in 1867, aged forty-two, leaving 
a widow and two children. Lorenzo, who was 
a shoemaker, died unmarried at the age of 
thirty-one. Samuel, who lived in Coalvale, 
Kan., died in 1890, aged sixty. He left a 
widow and three children. Martha Maria died 
in childhood. Sarah Elizabeth, also deceased, 
was the wife of Lewis Parks. Ann Maria is 
the wife of Nathan Wheeler, of Hudson. Jon- 
athan is a shoemaker living in Hudson. 

Abijah Parks Wolcott went to work in a 
shoe shop at the age of twenty, and was after- 
ward engaged in shoemaking for about seven 
years, spending five of them in Rock Bottom. 
During the last three years of his father's life 
he worked for hire on the home farm, and in 
the succeeding month of April, after his death, 
he took possession of the property, buying the 
interests of the other heirs. He makes a spe- 
cialty of dairy products and fruit, including 
apples and peaches. The farm is a valuable 
one, desirably located. By years of constant 
labor and intelligent management its present 
owner has brought it to a high state of cultiva- 
tion. There are acres of valuable fruit-trees, 
which yield a handsome income. The farm 
has all modern accessories, including a dairy 
barn with -basement. The house, which was 
built by Mr. Wolcott's father in 1840, is large 
and well arranged, and stands on a beautiful 
eminence, commanding a fine view of the sur- 
rounding country, about a mile and a half 
from the town of J-Tudson. 

On May 13, 1863, Mr. Wolcott was married 
to Lucy Delia, daughter of Lyman Perry, of 
Marlboro, Mass. She was born in Sudbury, 
June 14, 1838. Mr. and Mrs. Wolcott have 
one daughter, Mabel Annie, who graduated 
from the Hudson High School, and is now the 



wife of Frank Hallock. The latter came into 
the Wolcott family when he was eleven years 
old, and grew up with his wife. In his early 
manhood he spent six years in the West, after 
which he returned to marry his former play- 
mate. He now manages the farm. Mr. Hal- 
lock is well known and esteemed in Hudson 
and Stow. They have one child. Perry Wol- 
cott Hallock. Mr. Wolcott is a stanch and 
active Republican, and has attended a number 
of conventions as delegate. Though not an 
aspirant to office, he has served on the Board 
of Selectmen, and was Road Commissioner for 
six years. Mrs. Wolcott is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Rock Bottom, 
and Mr. Wolcott attends service there and con- 
tributes liberally to church enterprises. 



fOSHUA YOUNG, D.D., minister of 
the First Parish Church of Groton, 
was born in 1823 in East Pittston, 
Me., the eleventh child of Aaron and 
Mary (Coburn) Young. His parents moved 
to Bangor when he was four years old, and in 
that city he acquired his elementary educa- 
tion, preparing for college in the public 
schools. He was graduated at Bowdoin in the 
class of 1845, of which there is to-day but one 
other survivor, Charles P. Roberts, of Boston ; 
and he was graduated at the Divinity School 
of Harvard University in 1848. The degree 
of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him 
by Bowdoin in 1889. One of his classmates 
in the study of theology at Cambridge was the 
late Rev. Solon Wanton Bush, of Boston, 
sometime editor of the Cliristian Register, who 
died in March of the present year, 1898. 

Joshua Young was ordained on February i, 
1849, ^s pastor of the New North Church in 
Boston on Hanover Street. The sermon on 
the occasion was preached by the Rev. Fred- 
erick H. Hedge, then of Bangor, Me., the 
ordaining prayer was offered by the Rev. Dr. 
Parkman, the right hand of fellowship was by 
the Rev. Samuel H. Winkley, and other parts 
of the service were taken by the Rev. Thomas 
Starr King, Dr. Chandler Robbins, the Rev, 
F. D. Huntington, the Rev. Samuel Cruft. 
The first pastor of that church was the Rev. 
John Webb, who was ordained in 17 14. 




JOSHUA YOUNG. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Among his successors were the Rev. Peter 
Thacher, the Rev. Andrew Eliot, and the 
Rev. Francis Parliman, D.D., who was fol- 
lowed by Dr. Young. 

From Boston Dr. Young went in 1852 to 
Burlington, Vt., and remained there until the 
breaking out of the Civil War. Subsequently 
he was six years in charge of the New North 
Church at Hingham, Mass. In i86q he took 
an extended tour in Egypt and the Holy Land, 
and on his return he accepted a call from the 
Unitarian church at Fall River. He came to 
Groton in 1875, and, though now seventy- 
four years of age and somewhat hard of hear- 
ing, he continues to attend faithfully to his 
parish duties, and keeps up his old-time prac- 
tice of helping in works of philanthropy and 
reform. 

Dr. Young was a stanch abolitionist when 
a young man, and was active in the anti-slavery 
movement, keeping a station on the under- 
ground railroad in Vermont. In company 
with a friend, in 1859 he attended the funeral 
of John Brown, of Ossawatomie, and, being 
the only clergyman present, he was asked by 
Wendell Phillips to conduct the services. 
This was an unexpected honor, especially as 
he arrived late, a storm on Lake Champlain 
delaying him so that he was only able to join 
the cortege as it neared the old Brown House 
at North Elba in the Adirondacks. Dr. 
Young believes that Brown was called by a 
higher power to start the movement to free the 
slaves. He finds in John Brown's diary, 
written at the early age of ten, that he then 
hated slavery, and swore eternal enmity to it. 
John Brown moved from Connecticut, his na- 
tive State, to North Elba, N.Y., in order to 
give assistance and advice to the colored 
people who were settling there. 

On returning to his home in Burlington 
after the burial of John Brown, Dr. Young 
found that he was largely ostracized. The 
wealthiest families left his church. Doors 
were shut against him and blinds drawn where 
he had been a welcome guest before. His 
former friends avoided him on the street, and 
he was reviled in the newspapers, classed with 
such men as Garrison and Phillips. Some 
even said it would serve him right to hang 
him to the highest tree on the common. He 



so realized the disturbed condition of his 
parish that he deemed it wise to resign his 
pastorate; but such are the changes wrought 
by time that many who reviled him then are 
now glad to claim the honor of his ac- 
quaintance. 

Dr. Young has prepared a lecture on John 
Brown, which he has delivered several times 
to appreciative audiences. He is the author 
of several published discourses, notably one 
preached the Sunday after the rendition of 
Anthony Burns, he being an eye-witness to 
that painful scene. Dr. Young was a trustee 
of Derby Academy while resident in Hing- 
ham, and gave the annual sermon before its 
pupils. He delivered the historical address 
at the centennial celebration of Old Colony 
Lodge, A. F. & A. iVI., at Hingham, Decem- 
ber g, 1892, and prepared and published the 
memorial of the lodge. He was an active 
and interested member of this lodge and its 
Chaplain from 1865 to 1872; and on Febru- 
ary 21, 1888, the lodge made him an honorary 
member. While resident in Fall River he 
was made a Royal Arch Mason, and for eight 
years, beginning December 27, 1871, he was 
Chaplain of the Grand Lodge. He is a life 
member of the American Unitarian Associa- 
tion. 

He was married February 14, 1849, to Mary 
Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sylvanus Plymp- 
ton, M.D. , of Cambridge. Dr. Plympton, 
who was a Harvard graduate, was one of the 
leading physicians of Cambridge. Dr. and 
Mrs. Young are the parents of the following 
children: Mary Elizabeth (deceased), wife of 
Daniel Stevens; Grace D., widow of the late 
John Patten, druggist, of Bangor, Me. ; Lucy 
F., now residing with her parents; J. Edson, 
D.D.S., of Medford, Mass., who married Miss 
Mathilda B. Kenker, of Grand Rapids, Mich.; 
and Harry G., a druggist, of Winchester, 
Mass. Mrs. Stevens left two children: 
Waldo W., a graduate of Harvard in the class 
of 1897; and Ralph P., a machinist. Mrs. 
Patten ' is a prominent lady of Bangor, a 
teacher of literature. Harry G. Young mar- 
ried Miss Lillian W. Brooks, of Boston, and 
has one child, Hester Emily. 

Dr. Young is always ready to shoulder any 
responsibility that seems to be for the good of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the community. He has been identified with 
every progressive movement in the place, and 
was largely instrumental in securing the hand- 
some building for the public library. His 
popularity increases year by year. He is an 
able reasoner, an eloquent orator, and has a 
happy command of pure English; and he is 
blessed with a genial and cheerful disposi- 
tion. 



Wi 



,LIAM F. MERRITT, the Town 
Clerk of Ashland, was born Febru- 
ary 26, 1846, in the part of Hopkin- 
ton that about a month later was incorporated 
as Ashland. He comes of old Colonial stock, 
the emigrant ancestor of the family having 
landed on the shores of Massachusetts in 1680. 
Educated in the public schools of Ashland, he 
obtained a practical knowledge of the common 
branches of study. In 1864, when eighteen 
years old, he enlisted in Company B, Forty- 
second Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. At 
that time troops were being " rushed " to the 
front. Having enlisted on Wednesday, he re- 
ceived his equipments on the following Satur- 
day, started with his comrades for the South 
on Sunday, and one week from the day on 
which he signed the muster-roll was on duty 
in Washington. He was subsequently on 
guard and provost duty in Washington and 
Alexandria until the expiration of his term of 
service. 

After his return to Ashland Mr. Merritt 
was engaged in the boot and shoe business 
■until 1 891, when he was appointed Postmaster 
of the town. On his retirement from that 
office he bought the periodical store which he 
has since conducted most successfully, having 
a good trade in the leading newspapers and 
magazines of the day. He has served on the 
Board of Registrars, and is now filling his sec- 
ond term as Town Clerk, rendering prompt and 
efficient public service. He enjoys the unique 
distinction of having received every vote but 
one of those cast for Town Clerk in Ashland 
in 1897. 

Mr. Merritt is a member of Colonel Pres- 
cott Post, No. 18, G. A. R., of which he is 
Past Commander ; and of North Star Lodge, 
F. & A. M., in which he has filled all the 



chairs, and been Master for four years. On 
September 29, 1866, he married Mary Ada 
Proctor, who is carrying on a substantial busi- 
ness in South Framingham as ladies' hair- 
dresser and manicurist. They have had one 
child, Mabelle L., who died October i, 1880, 
at the age of thirteen years. 



ON. AMOS J. SAUNDERS, a well- 
known merchant of Pepperell and an 
ex-member of the State Senate, 
was born in Rowley, Mass., August 
3, 1826. His parents were Joseph and Mary 
(Mighill) Saunders, both of whom were repre- 
sentatives of old and highl}' reputable families 
in Rowley. The ancestors of the Saunders 
family were early settlers in Scituate, and 
were identified with ship-building. Joseph 
Saunders, father of Amos J., was a carpenter 
by trade, and spent his entire life in his native 
town. 

Amos J. Saunders, the subject of this 
sketch, began his education in the schools of 
his native town. At the age of twelve he be- 
came a pupil at Dummer Academy, Newbury; 
and later he attended Pierce Academy, Mid- 
dleboro, Mass. Among his classmates in 
the latter institution were the Rev. A. H. 
Plumb, the pastor of the Walnut Avenue Con- 
gregational Church, Roxbury, Mass. ; Dr. 
W. J. Batt, of the Concord Reformatory; and 
ex-Governor Bourne of Rhode Island. After 
finishing the course of study at Pierce Acad- 
emy, he entered Brown University, Provi- 
dence, graduating with the class of 1855. 
Thereupon he commenced teaching in Dan- 
vers. In 1856 he was elected principal of 
Merrimac Academy, Groveland, Mass., and 
remained there about four years. Through 
the efforts of the Rev. E. P. Smith, the pastor 
of the Congregational church in Pepperell, 
and of other members of the examining board, 
Mr. Saunders was chosen principal of the Pep- 
perell Academy in i860, which position he 
occupied for seven years, much to his own 
pleasure and the satisfaction of the community. 
In 1867 he abandoned the calling of educator, 
and engaged in mercantile pursuits, occupy- 
ing a store located on the site of the present 
town house. A year later he opened another 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



store in East Pepperell, and conducted them 
both for some time. Finally, having disposed 
of the store in Pepperell, he moved to East 
Pepperell, where he has since resided, carry- 
ing on business with good financial results. 

In politics Mr. Saunders is an earnest sup- 
porter of the Republican party, is prominent 
in public affairs, and has rendered valuable 
services to the Commonwealth. He was a 
member of the Massachusetts House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1873 and 1876, and of the State 
Senate in 1877 and 1878. In the upper house 
he served in the Committees on the Liquor 
Law, Woman Suffrage, Claims, and Taxation ; 
and he was chairman of the Committee on Ed- 
ucation in 1878. He has been a Justice of the 
Peace since 1874, and he served as a member 
of the School Board for about twenty years. 
In November, 1856,